Best VPN services?

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Matt
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#2
I use Ipvanish, think you can have it on 4 devices. Cracking service, good speeds and lots of different countries to choose from. Although I normally use Amsterdam.
 
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#6
I use Security Kiss ATM because for about £5.00/month I get up to 50GB a month - which I never use being on a capped plan, but more importantly I can use it on unlimited PCs - which is important to me because I have a large number of VMs I use it on.

I use the 3 monthly Jadeite plan.

They also have a large number of servers worldwide so for my needs seem fine.

They are also upfront about the logs they keep - not important to me but might be for some who want maximum anonymity or privacy - remember though that absolute anonymity on the Internet is a virtual impossibility.

They also offer a FREE service so you can try before you buy!

I have also used CyberGhost VPN in the past and found them also very good but could only use it on 5 devices on their premium service but they do offer unlimited traffic.

They claim to keep no logs apart from those necessary for account maintenance.
 
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Steve
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#10
Do VPN's have data limits?
 
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Mark
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#15
Can someone explain, in small english words, what advantage a VPN gives ?

My very limited knowledge tells me its a way of hiding your internet activity.
Doesnt this flag you up as having something to hide?

I think I know that some folks use them to view tv channels that may be locked down to differing locales, but apart from that and a desire to have a little privacy, I dont understand the need ?

Not trolling either, genuinley in need of enlightenment.
 
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Neil
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#16
Depends what your intended use is.

Personally I wouldn't use a public network without an encrypted VPN. Ridiculously unsecure.

There are other uses including bypassing geographical blocks (my mobile manufacturer always releases patches to a certain country first).

Again personally I completely disagree with the current government view that all Internet traffic should be logged and recorded for a year. Its no different than asking everyone to have cctv installed in their front room and to wear tracker tags like criminals.
 
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#19
In traditional networking, you have literally to be connected to a network to have access to it - either with an ethernet cable or via Wi-Fi.
You connect to the Internet via a router/modem provided by your ISP - any device on your home network when it access the internet will be identifiable as coming from that router/modems public IP address.
Your ISP will be able to see your internet traffic - even using HTTPS it's still possible to see what websites you are visiting etc.

A VPN is a way of connecting into another network as if you were directly linked to it. It is possible to route some or all of your outbound traffic to via the VPN-connected network. I use VPN access for a number of things:
1) Obscuring my real IP address from the websites I visit
2) Preventing my ISP from inspecting my traffic
3) Ensuring that when I'm using a public Wi-Fi connection, my network traffic isn't inspected/manipulated
4) Using self-hosted services which run on my home server when I'm away from home
5) Remote administration of servers and network appliances for work

1-4 are mainly privacy centred. As I've become more aware of how our data is collected and analysed, I've become less reliant and cloud services and more reliant on my own self-hosted services. Unfortunately I can't eradicate them from my life entirely - because work, but at least I can obscure some of my on-line footprint.

My personal recommendation is BlackVPN. I don't actually use them, but I have friends that do and I intend to switch at some convenient point in the not to distant future. For years I've used PIA and, well, they are based in America which doesn't sit well with me.

One of my main reasons for running a pfSense firewall instead of just relying on my ISP provided routers is so that multiple devices can share the same VPN connections - their internet connections round-robbined between them so one HTTP request will go via Toronto and the next New Zealand etc. ...it doesn't play too well with sites that use GeoIP functionality but I generally try and avoid them anyway, or sites that see access from multiple IP addresses in parts of the world as potential hacking threats, but it doesn't generally cause me a problem.

This is a useful insight:
https://www.socialcooling.com/
 
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#20
A couple more tips if you plan on using a VPN for privacy purpsoses:

WebRTC can be used to leak your real IP address even when you are using VPN.
An internet seach with your search engine of choice should yield guidance on how to disable it.

Ensure that your chosen VPN provider has their own DNS servers, details of which are provided to you. Then configure your devices to use them rather than your ISPs default DNS servers. If you are using a VPN provider's app on a device, then that app should do this for you and prevent DNS leaks, but it pays to do the research.
 
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#21
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#22
A couple more tips if you plan on using a VPN for privacy purpsoses:

WebRTC can be used to leak your real IP address even when you are using VPN.
An internet seach with your search engine of choice should yield guidance on how to disable it.

Ensure that your chosen VPN provider has their own DNS servers, details of which are provided to you. Then configure your devices to use them rather than your ISPs default DNS servers. If you are using a VPN provider's app on a device, then that app should do this for you and prevent DNS leaks, but it pays to do the research.
You can use this site to check for DNS leaks:

www.dnsleaktest.com

As an extra defence you can also set your router to use OpenDNS servers:

https://www.opendns.com/setupguide/

Then the DNS leak test should always show the OpenDNS servers if you are not using a VPN service or the DNS servers of your VPN service if you are.

If at any time you see the DNS of your ISP then you have a DNS leak and your true ISP is being revealed.
 
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#24
You can use this site to check for DNS leaks:

www.dnsleaktest.com

As an extra defence you can also set your router to use OpenDNS servers:

https://www.opendns.com/setupguide/

Then the DNS leak test should always show the OpenDNS servers if you are not using a VPN service or the DNS servers of your VPN service if you are.

If at any time you see the DNS of your ISP then you have a DNS leak and your true ISP is being revealed.
Using OpenDNS is not a good idea if you care about privacy! :)
 
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John
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#25
Depends what your intended use is.
This.

Personally I wouldn't use a public network without an encrypted VPN. Ridiculously unsecure.
Definitely this. I have a VPN into a server at home (so not exactly trying to hide my activity), for the purposes of being able to use public WiFi hotspots without broadcasting my traffic for anyone nearby to slurp up and read.

There are other uses including bypassing geographical blocks (my mobile manufacturer always releases patches to a certain country first).
 
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#27
Using OpenDNS is not a good idea if you care about privacy! :)
No DNS server gives you privacy as they almost all keep logs but is does help to hide your true ISP.

I use it to protect against DNS spoofing and was not affected by the takedown of major companies last year when the Dyn servers were attacked:

http://uk.businessinsider.com/amazo...-and-etsy-down-in-apparent-dns-attack-2016-10

You can also use DNSCrypt to increase your safety by encrypting the OpenDNS servers as well as using a VPN.

And you can also use ShieldsUp to make sure that your router has no open ports:

https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2

Usually you may see about 3 open ports, more than that and you may be vulnerable to hack attacks.
 
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#29
Which is why you should use your VPN providers DNS servers!
They should not be logging DNS queries.
Perhaps not but there is no way to tell apart from what they say.

And my VPN, Security Kiss, encrypts their DNS servers so there is nothing to see even when using the DNS Leak Test.

But again, as I tell many people who ask about security, anonymity and privacy on the Internet, they don't really exist.

All you can do is cover your a**e as much as possible.
 
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#30
It's possible to become failry anonymous, e.g. using a burner laptop with tails at an internet cafe.
Hack a Wi-Fi access point with a pringles can antenna to distance it somewhate from you actual real location, procure VPN connection with stealth cryptocurrency payment (e.g. Bitcoin used in conjunction with DarkWallet)
 
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#31
It's possible to become failry anonymous, e.g. using a burner laptop with tails at an internet cafe.
Hack a Wi-Fi access point with a pringles can antenna to distance it somewhate from you actual real location, procure VPN connection with stealth cryptocurrency payment (e.g. Bitcoin used in conjunction with DarkWallet)
Well there's no need to actually pay for a VPN connection since many offer free access to a few servers as a trial - simply get a new one each time you need them.

And most internet cafe's have some form of cctv these day, and even if they don't the area around them will.

And even if passers by don't notice you using a Cantenna you will almost certainly be noted on CCTV.

If you want to see the lengths "The Man" will go to to track you down read "The Untold Story of Silk Road pts 1 and 2:

https://www.wired.com/2015/04/silk-road-1/

https://www.wired.com/2015/05/silk-road-2/
 
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Mark
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#32
Im going to ask the question again - forgive me.

Im all for privacy, trust me, but if you have nothing to hide, surely using a VPN flags you as slightly dodgy ?

Why would an average person feel the need to hide his internet activity?

Many years ago, in times of dial up, I remember reading the quite "in cyberspace, you leave footprints....", this hasnt changed at all from waht I read above. ?
 
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Graham
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#33
As said it's not just privacy but also accessibility. But I can also see situations where you may not be doing something illegal but may still be at risk of being targeting by the authorities such as protest groups etc.
 
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#34
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Mark
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#35
@Retune good enough answer I guess!
Much as I like the idea, it makes ME feel like Im doing wrong....
Its like obscuring your number plate just to drive to work ?
 
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Richard
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#36
@Retune good enough answer I guess!
Much as I like the idea, it makes ME feel like Im doing wrong....
Its like obscuring your number plate just to drive to work ?
Or like putting a letter in an envelope rather than using a postcard. If you've got nothing to hide you should be using postcards, anyone using envelopes should naturally invite suspicion.
 
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#38
There are perfectly legitimate uses for VPN. Corporations throughout the world use them to access their own networks remotely etc.
And another reason I use it is that on some sites (banking etc) if you logon with a different IP address to the one you normally use then the so called "security questions" kick in.

Since my ISP uses dynamic IPs this means that my primary IP address often changes and so I often used to get asked the security questions.

Using a VPN means that I can get an IP address that doesn't change so I'm spared those bothersome questions.

In addition to all the other advantages.
 
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Steve
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#39
There are perfectly legitimate uses for VPN. Corporations throughout the world use them to access their own networks remotely etc.
Correct, we use them to connect our sites across the world and securely connect corporate laptops from wherever they are.


Or like putting a letter in an envelope rather than using a postcard. If you've got nothing to hide you should be using postcards, anyone using envelopes should naturally invite suspicion.
Best analogy for a VPN I have seen yet :)
 
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