1. Gemizzel

    Gemizzel

    Messages:
    56
    Name:
    Gemma
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Hi all,

    4 years ago I bought the canon 55-250mm lens for my EOS1000D. Due to various reasons I haven't really picked up my camera in this time so am very much a complete beginner.

    My interest is birds & wildlife and would love to buy a longer lens but, sadly, I can't afford. I need to learn how to make the most of the lens I have and would love some tips on how I can use this lens to take photos of the subjects I enjoy.

    I was messing around with it in the garden the other day taking photos of birds on my feeder. By the time I got close enough, to take what I thought would have been detailed photo, the bird had flown away. :(

    I am sure, with the right guidance, I can use this lens to still take good photos of birds etc.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Tringa

    Tringa

    Messages:
    3,576
    Name:
    Dave
    Edit My Images:
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    Some birds are more tolerant of humans than others. The obvious one is the robin and one thing that brings robins very close (as in close enough to feed from the hand) are live mealworms. They are the larvae of the mealworm beetle so if they survive long enough to become adult they cause no problems.

    If you don't fancy using live food you could try dried mealworms. I find the response to dried mealworms to be variable. I know one garden where they (when soaked in some water) are taken readily, but in another they are ignored completely.

    Lots of other birds will also eat live mealworms but few are as tolerant as robins.

    If you have a tripod you could set the camera up close to where you feed the birds and trigger the shutter with a remote release. I realise this could result in more expenditure but less than the cost of bigger lens. If you try this make sure you cover the camera because the birds will perch on it and then they will ........

    Dave
     
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  3. sparker

    sparker

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    222
    Name:
    Simon
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    Robin.jpg

    Hi Gemma, Believe me when I say "I am no Simon King" when it comes to photography. The above image was taken about 8 feet from my patio doors with a 200mm lens ( and a bit of cropping!) but it can be done. I started off with the meal worms at the bottom of the garden and over a period of a week or so I gradually moved the feed nearer the doors. Once they are confidently feeding from a food source you can, with care, gradually move it towards you. As suggested, the camera was on a tripod at the doors and a remote shutter release was used....and you will need to take lots of pictures......this one was one of about 20...the rest were really rubbish!! Good luck.
     
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  4. sparker

    sparker

    Messages:
    222
    Name:
    Simon
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    Yes
    jdburkedjburke and Gemizzel like this.
  5. Gemizzel

    Gemizzel

    Messages:
    56
    Name:
    Gemma
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thank you so much for your suggestions.

    I am not lacking birds in my garden I am just lacking in talent!

    I currently get, long tailed, blue & great tits, goldfinches, song thrushes, nuthatches, robins and the odd greater spotted woodpecker!

    I am just looking at live mealworms! I didn't even know you could get live ones. The dried ones go in no time but I can never get close enough to get a good pic before they get spooked and take off.

    I have a summer house less than 6ft away from the feeder but the photos would be through the glass and that doesn't appeal to me.
     
  6. Tringa

    Tringa

    Messages:
    3,576
    Name:
    Dave
    Edit My Images:
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    If the glass in your summer house without blemishes and clean, and if you are able to take shots at 90 degrees to the glass the results might be too bad.

    The shot below was taken through double glazing and the subject was around 6 or 7 feet from the window.

    Alternatively is it possible to temporarily remove a pane of the glass from the summer house and replace it with a cloth fitted around the lens, or a wooden panel with a hole cut in it?

    Dave

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Gemizzel

    Gemizzel

    Messages:
    56
    Name:
    Gemma
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    If i was getting subjects like that in my garden I'd have scrapped the idea of sitting in the summer house and have rushed out and bought myself a longer lens - budget, what budget! What a beauty that is @Tringa
     
  8. Nod

    Nod Kronus

    Messages:
    30,457
    Name:
    Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
    Edit My Images:
    Yes

    If you can pin a dark blanket over a pane (and have a spare blanket to sacrifice!) you could cut a small hole at a suitable height and poke the lens through it. It might take a while (day or 2) for the more nervous visitors to get used to the set up but you should get some decent results. You'll need to make sure the glass is spotless and optically "good" for best results.
     
  9. MadWoman

    MadWoman

    Messages:
    854
    Name:
    Sue
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Have a look around for public hides. The wildlife is often habituated to these and comes very close. I have a nearby one at a garden centre where your lens would be perfect for both birds and deer.
     
  10. Suvv

    Suvv

    Messages:
    2,083
    Name:
    Kev
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Sit still in the garden, wait for a while and then wait longer, keep waiting and birds will normally still come to the feeder.
     
  11. Gemizzel

    Gemizzel

    Messages:
    56
    Name:
    Gemma
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    well I waited and waited a little more and nothing came to the feeder...... within 5 mins of me coming back in the house they were back on it. So they were obviously able to see me! (n)

    I will allow more time (more layers) and better camouflage next time :D
     
  12. russellsnr

    russellsnr

    Messages:
    1,995
    Name:
    Russell
    Edit My Images:
    No
  13. Gemizzel

    Gemizzel

    Messages:
    56
    Name:
    Gemma
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thank you so much @russellsnr
    That’s just what I needed! Really appreciate you sending the link (y)
     

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