Canon 5d MkIV vs Canon EOS R

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#1
Hi Everyone.

This mainly aimed at Canon users but I was thinking a getting Mk4 but also tempted with the EOS R.... has any one had experience using both camera bodies if so what are your thoughts.
 
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#4
The way I see it, camera manufacturers are still working to perfect the full frame mirrorless camera system, whereas they've pretty much got there with DSLRs such as the Canon 5D4 and the Nikon 850. If I were to upgrade at the moment it would be to a 5D4, as it would just mean changing the camera body rather than my whole lens system as well. I'd watch and wait to see how mirrorless full frame goes, and leave the test piloting and guinea pigging to others.

This approach worked well enough for me when autofocus SLRs were launched, and when DSLRs first came out too. If money is no object then it can be fun to try the latest kit, if not, then I find it's best to wait until there becomes a definite disadvantage to not making the change.
 
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#5
Hi Everyone.

This mainly aimed at Canon users but I was thinking a getting Mk4 but also tempted with the EOS R.... has any one had experience using both camera bodies if so what are your thoughts.
Been there and wound up with a 5D4 (brilliant camera IMO).
The canon mirrorless is a system which appears to be in its infancy. My gut feeling (and nothing more) is that mirrorless has some way to go before it is a viable option to Canon DSLR systems.

As for experience with both, mine is limited to an ef lens mounted on a dealer EOS R. It is an odd sensation using a 70-200 on a rather diminutive R body.
 
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#6
Been there and wound up with a 5D4 (brilliant camera IMO).
The canon mirrorless is a system which appears to be in its infancy. My gut feeling (and nothing more) is that mirrorless has some way to go before it is a viable option to Canon DSLR systems.

As for experience with both, mine is limited to an ef lens mounted on a dealer EOS R. It is an odd sensation using a 70-200 on a rather diminutive R body.
There are those who think that some mirrorless cameras already exceed Canon DSLR's in a number of areas. The Sony A7III and A9 spring to mind but if looking purely at image quality for subjects which aren't too demanding of AF then the list could lengthen, and perhaps considerably so.
 
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#7
If you don't see a clear difference between them then it's hard to ignore that you can get a 5D IV for half the price of the R, eventually I think the R wins because all (or most) of Canon's newest lenses will be RF mount but there's plenty of time to worry about that yet.
 
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#8
The way I see it, camera manufacturers are still working to perfect the full frame mirrorless camera system, whereas they've pretty much got there with DSLRs such as the Canon 5D4 and the Nikon 850. If I were to upgrade at the moment it would be to a 5D4, as it would just mean changing the camera body rather than my whole lens system as well. I'd watch and wait to see how mirrorless full frame goes, and leave the test piloting and guinea pigging to others.

This approach worked well enough for me when autofocus SLRs were launched, and when DSLRs first came out too. If money is no object then it can be fun to try the latest kit, if not, then I find it's best to wait until there becomes a definite disadvantage to not making the change.
Without wishing to start an argument, perfection means something different to different people.
What's perfect for me may not suit you and vice versa.
I also think far too much emphasis is placed on autofocus these days.
We recently had a talk at our club from a chap extolling the virtues of Lumix compact cameras for street photography.
He made a big thing about the touch focus ability of the Lumix, but all the while I kept thinking "Just use manual focus!"
Having recently purchased a 5D IV, I have no intention of switching cameras, however favourable the reviews of new models.
The EOS R and 5D IV appear to have very similar, if not the same, sensors, so you are unlikely to see any discernable difference on similar sized prints.
 
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#9
Without wishing to start an argument, perfection means something different to different people.
What's perfect for me may not suit you and vice versa.
I also think far too much emphasis is placed on autofocus these days.
We recently had a talk at our club from a chap extolling the virtues of Lumix compact cameras for street photography.
He made a big thing about the touch focus ability of the Lumix, but all the while I kept thinking "Just use manual focus!"
Having recently purchased a 5D IV, I have no intention of switching cameras, however favourable the reviews of new models.
The EOS R and 5D IV appear to have very similar, if not the same, sensors, so you are unlikely to see any discernable difference on similar sized prints.
Don't worry, I know all about manual focus as I grew up with it and still use numerous old film cameras that have nothing but manual focus. :)

Talking of auto focus, it amuses me to some extent when people go on about touch focus, face recognition, eye recognition, etc. Back in the late 1990s and early 2000s, eye controlled focus (ECF) was available on some of the higher spec range of Canon 35mm SLRs. If you took your time to calibrate it correctly and learnt how to use it, and it worked for you (if not then it could simply be switched off), it was really handy, especially with the 45 focus points on the Canon EOS-3. You just looked at the focus point you wanted, pressed the shutter half way and the camera would select that point to focus on. It was almost instant speed-wise. If it missed the AF point then you just repeated the process... no messing about with joysticks, 4-way direction-buttons, prodding a screen, etc. Just look, press and done! So those 'modern' alternatives look a bit primitive to me by comparison.

I know I've said this before, but I really miss ECF when going from my Canon EOS-3 and EOS 30 cameras to my 6D. If they brought ECF back as an option on the 5DV when it's launched then I'll be after one. If Canon do bring ECF back then I hope it's not just on mirrorless full frame only though, as that would give me a dilemma! :LOL:

Anyway, I suppose we'd better get back on topic as we've not even got to the end of page 1 yet! :coat:
 
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#10
. My gut feeling (and nothing more) is that mirrorless has some way to go before it is a viable option to Canon DSLR systems.
.
We each want/need different things, so this is just my finidngs, but in my case ive taken 17 shots with my 5d4 since last May, and close to 3,000 with my Canon M50. Im giving up on FF DSLR this year by the looks of it.
 
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#11
We each want/need different things, so this is just my finidngs, but in my case ive taken 17 shots with my 5d4 since last May, and close to 3,000 with my Canon M50. Im giving up on FF DSLR this year by the looks of it.
Perhaps I did not word my response well.
I have no doubt Canon will eventually only make mirrorlesss cameras but the Canon line is in its infancy.

Sony, on the other hand, appear to be leading the pack.


What I would like from a mirrorless camera will always be different to others. As a point of no interest, I'd like a EOS R with the same proportions as a 1dx2 as I like the handling and eye point.
 
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#12
Based on specs then yes, Sony lead the way, but being able to go from a 5D3/4 over a 5 year period to a M50 shows me that Canon are doing something right, at least for me.
Figure and specs are one thing, but usability is another. Sometimes packing everything in to a small box is not ideal. I had a A6000 and hated it. It was too fiddly to use.
Its early days though, lets see how things pan out in 5 years time.
 
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#13
I've just been to the WWPotY in Gloucestershire; great set of images. The public vote set were equally wonderful. So what? Well, I can't help but peer at the information. Lots of Canon [5D variations / ID variations]and Nikon and a few drone images. No EOS R images yet but I imagine the closing date for 2018 was probably very close to the release date. I didn't spot any other brand of camera. Just sayin' . :exit:
 
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#17
We get it! Sony are hot atm ... does every thread on here have to end up as pretty much a Sony one though? they're the iphone of photography right now in my eyes
Quite. We need more balanced views, with a bit of M4/3-bashing thrown in :D
 
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#20
I have owned a 5D-4 but replaced it with a 1DX-2 and I also have an EOS-R.

For my purposes I prefer the EOS-R to the 5D-4. They both deliver equally high image quality but there are features about mirrorless that I very much prefer.

There's no such thing as the perfect camera and there are some minor aspects of each which I prefer over the other.

IF you decide to buy the EOS-R, get Canon's EF lens Adapter with Control Ring - It will potentially transform your way of shooting.

As always, which camera suits you best depends on the subjects you shoot.
 
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#21
EOS R obviously gives you an element of future proofing towards RF lenses. Image quality is going to be the same given its the same sensor with the EOS R having an upgraded DIGIC. I personally got the EOS R over the 4, mainly because I want a smaller body and its only a matter of time before canon release some budget RF glass that is also on the small side for those casual walkabouts.

Its totally down to choice though, but for me I wanted a camera that is good on proper shoots and actually having something to use casually - the R gives me both of those.
 
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#22
I have owned a 5D-4 but replaced it with a 1DX-2 and I also have an EOS-R.

For my purposes I prefer the EOS-R to the 5D-4. They both deliver equally high image quality but there are features about mirrorless that I very much prefer.

There's no such thing as the perfect camera and there are some minor aspects of each which I prefer over the other.

IF you decide to buy the EOS-R, get Canon's EF lens Adapter with Control Ring - It will potentially transform your way of shooting.

As always, which camera suits you best depends on the subjects you shoot.
I went 1dx2 to 5d4. What a mistake.
I'll have a 1dx2 again before the summer is out though.

Have you ever tried an EOS R with a 300mm 2.8 fitted? nightmare.
 
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#24
Surely, That lens is a nightmare to handhold on pretty much any body.
Actually the 300mm mk2 is surprisingly easy to use hand held on a 5D4 with grip.
Sure it's heavy but it balances well unlike with a P&S (aka, mirrorless).
 

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#27
I didn't know that.:thinking:
The latest Panasonic S1/R and the Olympus EM1X are pretty big. The sony A9 is fairly chunky too especially good with the added grip.
So there are various bigger option for people who prefer bigger bodies :)
 
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#28
I am about to buy a Canon BG-E22 Battery Grip for my EOS-R, primarily to extend battery use during an intensive shooting session but it also has the advantage of improving physical grip and balance when handheld on a bigger lens. I had a battery grip on my 7D-2 (now sold) and so know the advantages it offers my photography. I may have to buy a slightly bigger Lowepro holster bag - Toploader 70 II instead of the 50 II which I have.

I mostly shoot my Canon EF 100-400mm L II handheld on my 1DX-2 but like my EOS-R mounted on my EF 500mm F/4L II for tripod shooting. I find the R's controls very awkward indeed in portrait orientation when shooting handheld, particularly the AF-ON Back Button Focus. On a tripod the EOS-R's smaller size and lighter weight simply don't matter.

The R's battery grip looks a big chunky beast!
 
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#31
If it had a similar sized shell and control lay out I would be a happy bunny.
.... Add the Canon Battery Grip to an EOS-R and you have a very similar body shell size.

Controls layout is very much within the style and ergonomics of all Canon EOS cameras - They are very easy to adapt to. They only vary according to the specific features of each camera body model. Mirrorless technology introduces some very useful possibilities and the future looks exciting.
 
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#32
I'll hopefully be looking at buying a complete system early next year, both bodies and lenses. As I've only got a snapshot bridge at the moment it'll be a clean slate for me. I was the owner of a couple of 5d3 bodies and a nice selection of white lenses but have lost touch with recent developments so enjoying all these comparison thread to help me catch up. As I say I've got 12 months for that so lots of time. The way it looks to me is long lenses and wildlife = DSLR, short lenses and landscape = ML. My genre is wildlife and landscape so maybe one of each then :naughty: it's going to be interesting watching developments in the coming year.
 
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#33
I was looking at changing from a 5div to the eos r but it would cost too much, not just the body but the 24-70ii is almost 1/2 of the rf 28-70, I think it will need to be a bit cheaper before I swap over, I have no interest in using EF lenses with an adapter either, it would be simpler to keep the 5d.
 
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#34
I'll hopefully be looking at buying a complete system early next year, both bodies and lenses. As I've only got a snapshot bridge at the moment it'll be a clean slate for me. I was the owner of a couple of 5d3 bodies and a nice selection of white lenses but have lost touch with recent developments so enjoying all these comparison thread to help me catch up. As I say I've got 12 months for that so lots of time. The way it looks to me is long lenses and wildlife = DSLR, short lenses and landscape = ML. My genre is wildlife and landscape so maybe one of each then :naughty: it's going to be interesting watching developments in the coming year.
.... I probably have exactly what you would want (but none of my gear is currently for sale!). I shoot 95% wildlife and a bit of landscape if a view takes my fancy (even sometimes on my iPhone) but my landscape work is nothing like as skilled and involved as many serious landscape photographers produce.

I started off about 5 years ago with a Canon 70D, then upgraded to a 7D-2, then added a mirrorless EOS M5 which I found too small with my EF lenses, then added a 5D-4 which I swopped for a new 1DX-2 about 6 months later. I then swopped both my 7D-2 and M5 for an EOS-R + RF 24-105mm. So, if you're still with me, I now have just a 1DX-2 and an EOS-R. In other words, one D-SLR body and one mirrorless.

I usually take out both bodies and two Canon L lenses and often a tripod. Each body has its own pros and cons and it's Horses-for-Courses and depends on my mission's target. Different combinations of body and lenses plus a choice of three tripod heads, offer me different options which are chosen again depending on hoped-for target species.

For wildlife my first choice is the 1DX-2 with its 14fps and rugged weatherproofing. Usually on either EF 100-400mm L II or EF 500mm F/4L II plus 1.4x and 2x Extenders (must be version III on version II L glass).

For (very amateur) landscapes my first choice is the EOS-R with RF 24-105mm. But I will snap a landscape with anything I have at hand and yesterday for example I shot a quick distant landscape with my 1DX-2 plus EF 500mm on a tripod.

When the mini-beast season starts again I will mostly go out with a EF 100mm Macro on my EOS-R and its Vario-angle screen and mirror-tech focussing aids will be invaluable. I will also have my EF 100-400mm + 1DX-2 with me.

If you shoot a lot of wildlife, as you do more and more you will find it difficult to resist buying a supertelephoto lens and they are expensive even when secondhand.

If you want to check out what kind of results I have got on various Canon EOS cameras and lenses, do check out my albums on Flickr :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/114775606@N07/albums
 
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