Canon Zoom Lens

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239
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#2
Yes, I had this lens for just under a year, I sold it to help fund some macro gear... Nice and sharp where it counts, nothing to moan about, is was very useful, wouldn't hesitate to get another, in fact I'm watching a couple of ebay!
 
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Name
Darran, Daz or ****
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#3
If you are prepared to buy a used lens the Canon 70-300L IS can be picked up for around £500.
It's a very sharp lens throughout the focal range.
 
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5,525
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Darran, Daz or ****
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#8
Thanks Mr Badger that is definitely a consideration, I'm no professional so the additional cost of an L lens isn't really justifiable.
If the weight is an issue then fair enough.
Otherwise another £35 for a used L lens is well worth it.
There are a lot of members here including myself who are not professional photographers but once you've owned an L series lens you quickly realise they are well worth the investment.
Just don't make the same mistakes I did and that was to try various longer reach lenses before I realised I had just wasted money before buying an L lens.
 
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494
Name
Clint
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#9
Thanks Mr Badger that is definitely a consideration, I'm no professional so the additional cost of an L lens isn't really justifiable.
Even so, with the advent of digital and high res monitors you notice all the problems with lens imperfections. It’s best to invest in lenses as you tend to keep them, where as with bodies you’re more likely to upgrade.
 
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#10
Don't get me wrong, I own some L lenses and they are beautifully made and a pleasure to use, and whilst I have a couple of non-L lenses that are almost as sharp, to the stage of pixel peeping to see the difference, the contrast and colour rendition of the L lenses are noticeably better, and the build quality comparison is like night and day.

However, weight and size can be an important consideration; there's not much point in having a lovely lens if, once the novelty of ownership has worn off, you find you're not using it as much because it's heavy.

As to the which 70-300 question, I seem to remember there were quite a few reviews on YouTube (including one from Christopher Frost), but I always compare a few reviews and see if there's a general consensus of opinion, rather than trusting someone I don't know, or seeing a review of what might have been a 'one off' slightly sub-standard or faulty lens - or the reviewer hasn't figured out how to find the best settings for what they're doing.

Of the two, on balance, if weight wasn't an issue and I didn't need the super-fast Nano focus of the 70-300 Mk2, then I'd go for the L version if I could find a mint-ish one with a good long warranty from a reputable dealership for around the £500 mark - or a bit more if it made a big difference to the available condition. Hope my suggestions are useful and best of luck choosing what's right for you, hope you get a good one. (y) Don't forget to let us know how you go on. :)
 
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Rod Boughton
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308
Name
Rod
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#12
Omg I give up, I've completely muddled my brain with reviews and different lenses, I've been looking at the tamron 100-400mm f/4.5-6.3 di vc usd as well as the L lenses and I really cant decide!!
 
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494
Name
Clint
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Yes
#13
Ha ha, been there done that. When deciding on a lens purchase consider the following
1) Cost and budget, second hand or new or grey market.
2) Sharpness especially at the long end as you want this zoom mainly for this. Is the aperture wide enough for the light you shoot in? Is the focal length long enough to capture your subjects as there is only so much cropping can do?
3) Weight, I personally hate carrying large amounts of gear. You might not mind.
4) Handling, are you able to comfortably hold and operate the controls on the lens and camera?
5) Build quality, is weather sealing important?
 
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Rod Boughton
Messages
308
Name
Rod
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Yes
#14
Ha ha, been there done that. When deciding on a lens purchase consider the following
1) Cost and budget, second hand or new or grey market.
2) Sharpness especially at the long end as you want this zoom mainly for this. Is the aperture wide enough for the light you shoot in? Is the focal length long enough to capture your subjects as there is only so much cropping can do?
3) Weight, I personally hate carrying large amounts of gear. You might not mind.
4) Handling, are you able to comfortably hold and operate the controls on the lens and camera?
5) Build quality, is weather sealing important?
Good idea, I'll break it down

1. Budget £400 to £500, Quite happy for new, used or grey.
2. Sharpness is important, aperture is fine around 4.5 and focal length does not need to be more than 300/400.
3. I would prefer light as possible.
4. Handling not an issue.
5. Weather sealing not important.
 
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