Change to mirrorless... or not?

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Ciaran
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Hi folks, Ive been thinking of a new camera lately (currently have a Canon 550d, a 7d, and a selection of various lenses) and am looking at a 5d mk4. The question I keep asking myself is, should I sell off all my current gear and change now to mirrorless and build up again from scratch, or is sticking with what I have the right thing to do? Keep thinking the second option would only be kicking the issue down the road into the future, but making it a bigger issue as there would be even more kit to change. I know that current lenses could be used with an adapter but I feel that i was going to make the change I would like to buy the actual lenses designed to go with the Camera(s). Its mostly a hobby for me, shooting my kids, some local sport, and recently a friends much smaller than planned lockdown wedding.

In summary I feel its either, stick with what I have ( a decent and well varied set of kit) and add to it, but might always be thinking its outdated, or start new with less of the new gear and gradually build up.

Ive been scanning the web for all info I can get but dont feel much wiser, and I appreciate that there will be differing opinions here on this question, and would be keen to hear what you think?
 
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Only you can decide if you want to spend a hefty chunk of cash replacing all your gear. I think the question you need to ask is what is my current gear stopping me from doing that a new item will allow me to do. Once you can focus on this IMO it will help with your decison
 
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Ian
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I used Canon DSLR's for over 10 years, with a long overlap with Fuji kit, and am now 100% Fuji. I didn't switch because of the mirror - I moved for the control dials of the Fuji, but I still miss the integrated GPS my 6D had.

What do you want from a move is the only real question: my friend went from Canon DSLR to the EOS R series - if you like your lenses and the way Canon works, then maybe look for something in the RF mount lineup ? I've used Fuji<>EF adaptors and they're ok but the images from my EF 70-200 never had the same magic feel on Fuji that they did when shooting on the Canon (which I put down to the camera sensor), but the EF<>RF adaptor is very different from my 3rd party one as it's built by folk who know _exactly_ what the protocols are and how the firmware should behave as they own all of the specs, and I've heard no complaints from my friend about the feel fo any of his EF glass on the R.

Not sure if you're looking at new or 2nd hand, but an EOS RP + adaptor or an EOS R + adaptor do cross over with the price of a 5D Mk IV, even in the 2nd hand range (according to CameraPriceBuster just now).

I now much prefer mirrorless, firstly for the image preview (I like monochrome, so visualisation and choosing crushed blacks or blown highlights for drama is so much easier), and secondly for the exposure preview (no more missing a -3 EV comp dialled in from earlier) - you could even argue that Live View would also give me what I like about mirrorless so there's nothing inherently wrong with a mirrored camera.
 
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Alan
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I suppose the expense will in part depend on what lenses you have and if they'll fit a 5D or not. If they'll fit then that cuts the cost of moving to a 5D but if not you may be starting again with some lenses.

I think there are many advantages to mirrorless especially for Canon DSLR users as Canon arguably haven't been at the cutting edge for years so from that point of view moving to another mirrorless manufacturer could potentially up the image quality, if these things are noticeable.

Good luck choosing.
 

nandbytes

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Depends on what you are after... for me mirrorless means compact FF gear with mostly smaller, sharper and better lenses along with EVF that gives WYISWYG.
Canon have publicly announced they will be only developing mirrorless gear moving forward so EF stuff is on the way out. That does mean the value will slowly reduce but if you keep your lenses and body for say 5-6 years you will have got plenty use of it. At which point does it matter how much the value reduced?
Also EF lenses will probably hold their value better than other DSLR mounts because the lenses adapt rather well on RF bodies. Though having been on adapters before they are fun for a while but will get fiddly and annoying unless you go down the route of having one adapter per lens or just fixing the adapter permanently to your body (at which point you might as well save some money and buy the 5Div).

Also if you are going to go down mirrorless route there's plenty more options these days with a lot of brand offering slightly different things. Canon EF lenses can be immediately adapted to most mounts of course canon RF providing best support being 1st party. But if your plan is to eventually have native lenses for whatever mount you swap to it shouldn't mater if swap to canon RF or Fuji or sony or whatever.
 
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This is a hard one and something I’ve thought about from both sides.

Mirrorless cameras have a lot of advantages (Size, AF tech, EVF, no lens AF tuning ) are obviously the way that camera technology is going. But this comes at a premium in terms of cost and like anything, just because there’s something new, it doesn’t automatically mean that DSLRs stop taking great photos!

I currently shoot Fuji and I love it as a system. It’s small, great quality, and overall ticks all the boxes for me. The likes of eye AF, as someone who shoots a lot of photos of my kids, is a game changer. The smaller size means that this camera gets taken out a lot more than a heavier DSLR set up.

I do miss having a FF camera sometimes though ( that’s a whole other can of worms) but to invest in a FF mirrorless system, at least without using adapted lenses( which of course works but defeats the size advantage of mirrorless) is understandably expensive.

So from a pure ‘bang for the buck’ point of view a DSLR is certainly the best option and for many uses a DSLR will still be an excellent choice, and I’d be lying if I said that the thought of switching back to the likes of a D810 or similar hadn’t crossed my mind.

But realistically DSLRs are eventually going to stop being supported or at least become very niche, so there does need to be a lot of thought before purchasing into that as a system.

But whatever you buy, DSLR or Mirrorless, it’ll allow you to take great photos and isn’t that what it’s all about!
 
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I am having the same problem. Bought a Fujifilm X-T4 and already have a 5D Mark iv with very low shutter count. At the moment not to sure about the Fuji, so don't know which to keep.
 
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I do miss having a FF camera sometimes though ( that’s a whole other can of worms) but to invest in a FF mirrorless system, at least without using adapted lenses( which of course works but defeats the size advantage of mirrorless) is understandably expensive.
I think you have to compare like for like whenever possible as not all FF mirrorless cameras and lenses are overly expensive compared to their DSLR equivalents. In fact some FF mirrorless cameras are clearly cheaper than their DSLR alternatives.
 
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I think you have to compare like for like whenever possible as not all FF mirrorless cameras and lenses are overly expensive compared to their DSLR equivalents. In fact some FF mirrorless cameras are clearly cheaper than their DSLR alternatives.
Yeah this is true, especially with Sony, but the likes of Canon and Nikon, being early days, the equivalent lenses in particular are definitely more expensive, especially with S/H DSLR glass prices.
 
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At some point you might run into the problem I had: Can you keep lugging that DSLR gear around, or is it just getting too heavy? I can now go out with my new X-E2 and 27mm lens in one pocket and a 15-45mm in the other and get over 90% of my shots. And a longer zoom is much more manageable in a backpack. Even my Sony A6000 and a couple of lenses is far lighter than my old Nikon equivalent.

The ability to look through the viewfinder (or at the LCD) and see the shot, rather than the scene, is priceless to me. I take more single shots of a subject and end up with more keepers.

If you can afford it, perhaps you could get a mirrorless and keep your DSLR. You could compare both systems and perhaps sell the one you don't get on with so much. I've still got my Nikon though I've only taken it out once in the last five years or so. You might find the same.
 
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Yeah this is true, especially with Sony, but the likes of Canon and Nikon, being early days, the equivalent lenses in particular are definitely more expensive, especially with S/H DSLR glass prices.
The newer and better mirrorless lenses may be a more special case as even in the DSLR world new can equal more expensive at least for a while until the prices settle down. Also some mirrorless lenses are very very good and perhaps amongst the best lenses ever seen in this market whilst some DSLR lenses are not very special at all really. As I said, maybe we need to compare like with as like as possible whenever possible.
 
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This is the Fuji "Medium format" camera range starting at over £3k? Remind me how many lenses are available for that system.

I know you aren't being really serious but just in case you are I thought I'd post a couple of very minor snags with the suggestion.
 
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Unless you're unhappy with your current gear or are thinking of expanding it soon then thinking of going mirrorless is just GAS in action unless there is some feature it has which you would find really, really useful.

If you can spare the cash, by all means go mirrorless. If you can't, use what you have.

Mirrorless is the future for cameras, but it isn't compulsory.
 

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This is the Fuji "Medium format" camera range starting at over £3k? Remind me how many lenses are available for that system.

I know you aren't being really serious but just in case you are I thought I'd post a couple of very minor snags with the suggestion.
Not as many lenses as Sony...but what is available is by all accounts very good and for the money there's nothing like it. Lens wise, price wise they're not even that much more costly than G master or Ziess sony stuff.

And the IQ from MF is incredible...
 
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. I think the question you need to ask is what is my current gear stopping me from doing that a new item will allow me to do. Once you can focus on this IMO it will help with your decison
+1.

Sell both and buy Sony :ROFLMAO:
I had a Canon 80d plus lenses and, for a short time, a Panasonic G80. Both now sold and currently, I have a Sony A7iii.
This is a very personal decision. For me, it came down to 2 things really.
First, as I’m not getting any younger I was finding lugging my Canon gear round Silverstone and the like was becoming a bit more difficult year on year. And the 80D isn’t really a heavy camera!
Second - and I accept that for many this is perhaps not a good enough reason to change - I specifically wanted to “get into” legacy lenses and although my Panny allowed me to do that, the Canon didn’t without a lot of faff and glass elements in adapters, etc.
I am glad I made the change.
As I’m now very much into legacy lenses (only one Sony AF lens), the comparative cost of native lenses for the respective brands doesn’t concern me. And I now would not give up my EVF for optical.
 

4wd

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There's no point spending a lot on changing without clear idea of imagined benefits.
The EF Canon lenses will hold value they can readily be adapted to Sony or Black Magic at least.
I had 5dii with three decent lens but sold up for Sony and wouldn't go back but I do a lot of video which was not realistic that Canon.
 
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Ciaran
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Thanks everyone, its great to hear your opinions.
A few things as follows:
Ive always wanted to go for a full frame camera and almost went for a 5d2 a few years back, hence now thinking of the 5d4, and most current lenses will fit this. If I did change to mirrorless though I think I would ultimately want to buy the dedicated lenses for this instead of using adapters and my existing lenses. Also cant help but think my cameras are both getting on now and are pretty old technology compared to whats available now.
I do like the Canon gear, but would consider changing to one of the other brands that have been offering mirrorless tech for some while now, as they seem to be better than Canon atm?
I guess Im at that point now where Im ready to go FF but am really unsure whether to stick with the dslr (which seems to be on the long way out) or bite the bullet and start my mirrorless journey now, instead of possibly going that way few years down the line, but with even more old gear to shift?
 
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I am having the same problem. Bought a Fujifilm X-T4 and already have a 5D Mark iv with very low shutter count. At the moment not to sure about the Fuji, so don't know which to keep.
What is it about the Fuji that you are unsure about?
 
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I’m currently wrestling with the same dilemma. Except in my case I’ve decided I really can’t cope with dragging a 7Dii with either a Sigma 300-800mm F5.6 or Canon 500mm F4 around. Currently torn between an R6 and a 2x converter on my 100-400mm and using the high iso abilities of the R6. Or going Olympus Om-d EM1X and 100-400. However for bird photography I’m worried the Olympus bird detection isn’t as good as the R6.
 
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I’m currently wrestling with the same dilemma. Except in my case I’ve decided I really can’t cope with dragging a 7Dii with either a Sigma 300-800mm F5.6 or Canon 500mm F4 around. Currently torn between an R6 and a 2x converter on my 100-400mm and using the high iso abilities of the R6. Or going Olympus Om-d EM1X and 100-400. However for bird photography I’m worried the Olympus bird detection isn’t as good as the R6.
Errr I use the omd1-mkii take a look at some of my photos both static and b.I.f before making any decisions . . Plenty on my Flickr stream just link from any of my pics on here .the Olympus 100-400 which equates to 200-800 takes 1.4 and 2x tc’s with no loss of i.q and can be used hand held ,in fact I haven’t used a tripod for 18 months now
 

Nikon_Nick

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Ultimately only you can decide, but I’m happy to tell you my experience. I was strictly a Nikon DSLR user for many years. Went through countless bodies and lenses in pursuit of what I considered my ‘perfect’ set up. Was there a lot of GAS involved? Yes, a lot, but my budget has never allowed me to go silly with it, and I generally only purchased what I felt I actually needed (or believed I needed at least ). Now though, I truly believe I have my perfect set up, and that is a mirrorless system. I love using it, love not having to lug half my body weight around in gear for a day out, and the image quality is fantastic. I use the Sony A7R3 and have a small selection of Sony Primes.
 
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richard
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I’m currently wrestling with the same dilemma. Except in my case I’ve decided I really can’t cope with dragging a 7Dii with either a Sigma 300-800mm F5.6 or Canon 500mm F4 around. Currently torn between an R6 and a 2x converter on my 100-400mm and using the high iso abilities of the R6. Or going Olympus Om-d EM1X and 100-400. However for bird photography I’m worried the Olympus bird detection isn’t as good as the R6.
As per “the back fox” post - I suggest you have a serious look at the em1.2 and the oly 100-400 - or the 40-150 pro + tc’s

I use a d500 + tam g2 150-600 and it is wonderful ( but heavyish ) but I have m43 also and did try the PL100-400 for a few weeks ( before it broke) on my em1.1.

I really wouldn’t underestimate the performance and the useability of m43 - it’s so good and compact.

As I said, I have and use the dsl r but the system I use most day 2 day is my nikon 1 v2 and the cx 70-300 ( 810 efl ). The m43 option is a considerable upgrade to that - almost to aps-c standards - and still very manageable.

I am considering selling the dslr and stuff and going em1.2 + oly 100-400. I sold my 40-150 pro a few years s ago - mistake!
 
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What is it about the Fuji that you are unsure about?
Was going to ask same. I think Fuji APSC is barely behind any of the FF options right now tbh, Sony just seem boring these days tbh, sure they keep coming out with new gear but none of it is inspiring. Another version of this or that they already had. Not saying Fuji have anything remarkable either, but bang per buck I challenge anyone to tell me why would anyone spend double, for slightly better IQ?
 
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Tim
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Thanks everyone, its great to hear your opinions.
A few things as follows:
Ive always wanted to go for a full frame camera and almost went for a 5d2 a few years back, hence now thinking of the 5d4, and most current lenses will fit this. If I did change to mirrorless though I think I would ultimately want to buy the dedicated lenses for this instead of using adapters and my existing lenses. Also cant help but think my cameras are both getting on now and are pretty old technology compared to whats available now.
I do like the Canon gear, but would consider changing to one of the other brands that have been offering mirrorless tech for some while now, as they seem to be better than Canon atm?
I guess Im at that point now where Im ready to go FF but am really unsure whether to stick with the dslr (which seems to be on the long way out) or bite the bullet and start my mirrorless journey now, instead of possibly going that way few years down the line, but with even more old gear to shift?
Sounds like GAS? What can’t you achieve with your current setup that you need?

I have a lot of canon bodies, Dslr and mirrorless, and EF lenses. The EF lenses work perfectly on the canon mirrorless bodies with the adapter. How much of help that is to you depends how invested you are in canon lenses. All the cameras can take amazing pictures. Some have features that make doing so in certain situations easier. For me especially useful is the eye autofocus tracking in the mirrorless bodies.

I’m not a kleptomaniac, I have them as multi camera live-streaming has taken off in the past year. Today’s livestream needed 5 for example.
 
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Steven
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How much money are you making from photography? How many images have been rejected due to equipment related issues?

Mirrorless still has more issues when it comes to really demanding situations. E.g. this is Canon's knowledge base for the R5... TBF, they are not all unique to mirrorless; but some are, and many are much more notable than they are with a DSLR.

"Shooting Conditions That Make Focusing Difficult
  • Subject with low-contrast such as the blue sky, solid-color flat surfaces or when highlight or shadow details are clipped.
  • Subjects in low light.
  • Stripes and other patterns where there is contrast only in the horizontal direction.
  • Subjects with repetitive patterns (Example: Skyscraper windows, computer keyboards, etc.).
  • Fine lines and subject outlines.
  • Under light sources with constantly changing brightness, colors, or patterns.
  • Night scenes or points of light.
  • The image flickers under fluorescent or LED lighting.
  • Extremely small subjects.
  • Subjects at the edge of the screen.
  • Strongly backlit or reflective subjects (Example: Car with a highly reflective surfaces, etc.).
  • Near and distant subjects covered by an AF point (Example: Animal in a cage, etc.).
  • Subjects that keep moving within the AF point and will not stay still due to camera shake or subject blur.
  • Performing AF when the subject is very far out of focus.
  • Soft focus effect is applied with a soft focus lens.
  • A special effect filter is used.
  • Noise (dots of light, banding, etc.) appears on the screen during AF."
 
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Was going to ask same. I think Fuji APSC is barely behind any of the FF options right now tbh, Sony just seem boring these days tbh, sure they keep coming out with new gear but none of it is inspiring. Another version of this or that they already had. Not saying Fuji have anything remarkable either, but bang per buck I challenge anyone to tell me why would anyone spend double, for slightly better IQ?
I just can't see cameras this passionately. I can't see Sony or any other brand as boring or whatever superlative you'd care to come out with about Fuji or any other brand. Lenses, maybe, but not really, not seriously and definitely not cameras and I wouldn't let such ill defined wooliness influence my buying choices.

Good luck to those who see camera gear in this way though but it's something that I just can't do. If the IQ and features are there and the ergonomics are ok that's all I want. I don't care what colour it is or about gear fondling and I don't care about the marketing BS and in fact too much marketing BS will probably make me less likely to buy.

I'm not sure about Sony cameras being double the price of a Fuji but you'd need to compare specific models as unsurprisingly the prices are all over the place. What is certain is that if going Fuji I assume you're talking APS-C whereas with Sony you have the choice of APS-C or FF.
 
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Errr I use the omd1-mkii take a look at some of my photos both static and b.I.f before making any decisions . . Plenty on my Flickr stream just link from any of my pics on here .the Olympus 100-400 which equates to 200-800 takes 1.4 and 2x tc’s with no loss of i.q and can be used hand held ,in fact I haven’t used a tripod for 18 months now
I’ve seen your photos and I’m in awe of your abilities and others posting bird photos using Olympus, however I’m in need of as much help as I can get! I’ve borrowed an OM-D E1 mkii and an R6, the R6 animal af is stunning, but to get somewhere similar I’d need an OM-D E-M1X and then the size and weight difference is being eaten into when comparing body and 100-400mm against R6 plus 100-400mm and 2x tc. I guess by nature I’m a prevaricator and for fear of making a mistake I’m doing nothing.
 
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Can you rent one of the mirror less system and a lens (or adapter for your lenses (shortterm) ) then you can try it and return it without spend lots... if you like it, then you can persue it.
If it weren't for covid, my usual advice is go to a store or a photo meet and try as many different cameras as you can that are in the target type.. you can feel size, build, see dials and options to see if they cover your needs/wants... including ff.

My personal journey was I wanted ff and I had a d300 nikon, always wanted leica (rangefinder) and eventually got an m240. it was great but old tech and second hand due to their body price... it missed out on newer iso. Had the fortunate luck to have a bit of dosh and a used m10 became available. thats what I have now... :)

I'd look at renting if possible.. with adapter just to use your lenses, perhaps a long weekend or a week... then you'd know if you like it or not...
 
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live exposure preview alone is worth getting mirrorless.

gone are the days of chimping all day
 
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Peter
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What is it about the Fuji that you are unsure about?
I have been using a Canon for the last 10 years and enjoy the feel of one in my hands, the fuji just does not feel right. The only reason I really contemplated was the weight factor, I am now 87 and not sure I can manage the backpack now (when allowed) with the weight.
 

SFTPhotography

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live exposure preview alone is worth getting mirrorless.

gone are the days of chimping all day
You can do this on my 645z, D810 and other decent DSLRs.

The 645z I don't even need to bother as it's metering is so damned good. It was needed on the D810 but the 645z just line the meter up using the shutter wheel and they come out perfect every time.
 
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I just can't see cameras this passionately. I can't see Sony or any other brand as boring or whatever superlative you'd care to come out with about Fuji or any other brand. Lenses, maybe, but not really, not seriously and definitely not cameras and I wouldn't let such ill defined wooliness influence my buying choices.

Good luck to those who see camera gear in this way though but it's something that I just can't do. If the IQ and features are there and the ergonomics are ok that's all I want. I don't care what colour it is or about gear fondling and I don't care about the marketing BS and in fact too much marketing BS will probably make me less likely to buy.

I'm not sure about Sony cameras being double the price of a Fuji but you'd need to compare specific models as unsurprisingly the prices are all over the place. What is certain is that if going Fuji I assume you're talking APS-C whereas with Sony you have the choice of APS-C or FF.
Passionatley? I look at them as lumps of gear, nothing more, I've used all sorts inc Sony over the years, never been swayed by the brand so I don't know where you're going on that one

I wouldn't even consider Sony apsc, the ibis is lacking for one and ergonomically they're poor, this is my opinion of course we all have different taste. Compare an XH1 to say, an A73, about the same age one is FF one isn't - that's my main point. If you're only thinking APSC then Fuji is the much better option IMHO, if you're on the fence about going FF then this is a better comparison. Where's the advantage? if you don't plan to splash out further on fancy FF lenses then you're starting at a loss I feel, I had this choice a time back and it made no sense to opt for the Sony, coulcn't see any advantages after viewing hundreds of images produced by both on here or the usuals like Flickr. I was always swayed more by what I saw from the Fuji cams, and yes this is down to the photographers producing those lovely images in a big way but I have never once thought 'the FF has a more distinct look/feel' - atm I'm using a cheap as chips XC35F2, the combination is cheaper than I could find an A7III body only and then you're talking possibly one of Sony's worst lenses to compete, the 50mm 1.8 [I don't care about DOF comparisons] I'm saying you won't notice much different in shots taken by either but you've saved a few hundred that you can use for another lens
 

SFTPhotography

Ranger Smith
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And you pay handsomeley for it
Cheaper DSLRs do this - the D500, D850, Canon 5dmk4, even the naff Nikon D750's have it I am pretty sure

My point is you don't need a mirrorless camera to get histogram preview in live view. The 645z even has focus peaking etc, none of which I need to be able to focus and expose an image but nevertheless it is there along with clipping/blocking preview in LV as well. All with a nice OVF and size
 
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Keith
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Cheaper DSLRs do this - the D500, D850, Canon 5dmk4, even the naff Nikon D750's have it I am pretty sure

My point is you don't need a mirrorless camera to get histogram preview in live view. The 645z even has focus peaking etc, none of which I need to be able to focus and expose an image but nevertheless it is there along with clipping/blocking preview in LV as well. All with a nice OVF and size
Aye, I used many a dslr, still use a very cheap one at work [Nikon D3200] and it does the job just fine, but, I often wish I had my Fuji on board - just snappier, easier to teach someone to use [I work with people who have various Intellectual disabilities] the LCD for one is much, much faster and more reliable for shooting in live view - also i can show them physically what settings we are using - much easier to explain that way
 
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Can you rent one of the mirror less system and a lens (or adapter for your lenses (shortterm) ) then you can try it and return it without spend lots... if you like it, then you can persue it.
quite a few of the manufacturers now do a free 2 day test. I think Canon, Olympus and Fuji do it but I’m not sure on others.
 

SFTPhotography

Ranger Smith
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Aye, I used many a dslr, still use a very cheap one at work [Nikon D3200] and it does the job just fine, but, I often wish I had my Fuji on board - just snappier, easier to teach someone to use [I work with people who have various Intellectual disabilities] the LCD for one is much, much faster and more reliable for shooting in live view - also i can show them physically what settings we are using - much easier to explain that way
Interestingly Fuji is the one camera make I shudder with when a workshop client has one. Maybe because I am weaned on Nikon I found it harder to use and thus to demonstrate to them the various features to use. I know they have their following and no doubt the lenses and IQ is up there.

If it's easy though, try the Pentax range with the shooting info in the main back LCD screen along with the metering and AF point. Delightful.
 
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