Beginner Complete newbie and possible buyer’s remorse

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#1
Hi everyone

Complete newbie here, looking for some advice/validation/recommendations. I did a lot reading into cameras, looked up recommendations for beginner cameras, learnt a little about different kinds of sensors etc. I thought I would be happy with a Canon 1300d or a Nikon D3400 as a beginner and I’m not averse to buying used. I did look into mirrorless but it’s such a minefield I thought I’d just stick with a traditional entry level.

I then went into a store and tried holding a few different types. And I REALLY liked the size of the Canon M50. Which I wasn’t expecting to play a big part of my decision making but it got me to thinking I needed a mirrorless instead for the size.

Then the Black Friday sales happened, and I went a bought a full frame Sony A7 with a 28-70mm kit lens for £507. And I’m now wondering if I’ve been a bit hasty! I know full frame for this price is crazy, it’s a good deal. I’m just not sure it’s a good deal for me and I’m thinking of returning it. But before I do I wanted to get some thoughts if I may.

I don’t know yet what kind of photos I like taking, but I think it’ll mostly be portraits, particularly of my young daughter and landscapes. I doubt I’ll be shooting sports scenes.

The question is, should I keep the A7 as it’s such a good deal and I’ll be probably wanting to upgrade to full frame in the future anyway (won’t I?). Or should I return it and get something more suited to a beginner? A lot of forums recommend used mid level cameras rather than new entry level. So then I’m unsure whether I should keep the A7 instead (as that’s better than a used price anyway, I saw second hand ones selling on eBay for £585).

I feel a bit out of my depth and would really appreciate some feedback! Thanks
 
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droj
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#3
I'd say that now you're there, stick with it! What could be wrong? Just learn and enjoy.

The capability's there, the deal is to penetrate the menus and set it up for your style of work. Learning, in a way, to keep things simple.

Bon voyage!
 
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#4
Cameras are fundamentally the same, start by learning about how to use aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

If you're happy with the price you paid for the A7 and lens and like the ergonomics - then no other camera is going to make a difference for you right now.

Also in general it's a good purchase anyway - full-frame can make it easier to get wide lenses for landscape if desired - and the Sony e-mount has an expansive line up of bodies and lenses to upgrade to.
 
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#5
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#7
Thanks everyone for taking the time to respond. I guess it’s down to the price for me. Whilst £500 for a full frame is a bargain, I feel uneasy spending that much money when maybe a £200 used camera will work just as well for the time being (could I even find one for that price?). If I don’t know what I’m doing with it will I even notice the difference between this and an entry level DSLR? As most people have said, equipment doesn’t matter at this stage, and I’m keen to just get out and learn. The camera hasn’t even arrived yet FYI.

Then again, if a decent used beginner camera will cost me say £300+, then the cost saving doesn’t seem enough to downgrade? I guess I’m just trying to get comfortable with the amount of money I’ve just spent and that it’ll be worth it!

Also, and this may just highlight what a newbie I am, the A7 doesn’t have a built in flash. I know I can buy a flash, but then it’s going to look like a scary piece of equipment for beginner. Is the flash something I’m going to miss when I’m starting out?
 
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#8
A built on/in flash won’t do you any favours, it’ll work but not very nice.

Do you like the feel of it ?
Does it feel confatable to hold and use ?

If the answer to the above is yes, get out and get clicking

Just because it has loads of bits/buttons/setting doesn’t mean you have to use them but they are there for the future if you choose to.
 
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Rob
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#9
Thanks everyone for taking the time to respond. I guess it’s down to the price for me. Whilst £500 for a full frame is a bargain, I feel uneasy spending that much money when maybe a £200 used camera will work just as well for the time being (could I even find one for that price?). If I don’t know what I’m doing with it will I even notice the difference between this and an entry level DSLR? As most people have said, equipment doesn’t matter at this stage, and I’m keen to just get out and learn. The camera hasn’t even arrived yet FYI.

Then again, if a decent used beginner camera will cost me say £300+, then the cost saving doesn’t seem enough to downgrade? I guess I’m just trying to get comfortable with the amount of money I’ve just spent and that it’ll be worth it!

Also, and this may just highlight what a newbie I am, the A7 doesn’t have a built in flash. I know I can buy a flash, but then it’s going to look like a scary piece of equipment for beginner. Is the flash something I’m going to miss when I’m starting out?
I would say it’s a bargain price and you wouldn’t be upgrading in a short period. The problem with ‘beginner’ cameras is the lack of controls. That’s why a lot of people say get a mid level camera. For a decent begineer camera and kit lens I would say you are talking £300+ do saving £200 if you can send it back. Don’t forget if you get into photography you with upgrade later and lose even more on a beginner camera. To be honest if I was starting out now I would be looking at mirrorless. Remember you are buying into a system rather than buying a camera. Just get out and enjoy learning the camera!

Lack of on build flash isn’t really a deal breaker. Use of on board flash isn’t that great for photos. Off camera flash is definitely the way to go for being creative.
 
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#12
Keep it, use it and once you know what you enjoy in photography then upgrade or change. It’s a tool at the end of the day, the creativity is the hard part! :)
 
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#13
The A7 is an excellent camera - not just OK or so-so. It will be good enough to keep using further along your photographic journey too, when a starter camera would become limiting. You could certainly buy something used for less - a second hand Olympus E-MD10MkI with lenses for £300 perhaps, but that will be a less capable camera.

TBH I think you got an amazing bargain, and should enjoy the opportunity it's given you.
 
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#15
Regarding built-in flash, it can be handy sometimes for a bit of fill to light that's already there, but is hopeless as a main source unless your style is very brash and harsh. Neither do they have much power. So I woudn't miss one much. And you can't ever have everything. Go with that A7!
 
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#16
I don’t know yet what kind of photos I like taking, but I think it’ll mostly be portraits, particularly of my young daughter and landscapes. I doubt I’ll be shooting sports scenes.
Definitely keep it, great price and you'll end up appreciating the smaller size and lighter weight. I would recommend buying the Sony FE 50mm f1.8 lens which can be had for around £175. It's a great little lens for starting off with portraits (even with a full frame sensor) as you can play about with the depth of field and get that more 'professional look'. It will also allow you to shoot in even lower light without having to use the harsh flash and retain the natural tones, light and colours.

When I first started out I lost interest fast with just the kit lens, but after buying a 50mm 1.8 I was hooked on photography. That lens was all I needed for a long time until I got more serious. The kit lens you have will be good for landscapes but you don't always have to go wide for landscapes.
 
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#17
Notwithstanding the price of the Sony, one thing to consider is if you get bitten by the bug as many of us have and start buying additional lenses, etc, you're heading towards a heavy and expensive kit.

Is that what you want?
 
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#18
Notwithstanding the price ofoyhe Sony, one thing to consider is if you get bitten by the bug as many of us have and start buying additional lenses, etc, you're heading towards a heavy and expensive kit.

Is that what you want?
This thread is quite old now and the OP may not return but I just wanted to add a different view to this one just for a bit of balance :D

The Sony A7 series are FF cameras and the lenses are FF sized but there are still compact and reasonably priced options available and the system as a whole arguably isn't all that heavy or expensive when compared to the alternatives. In fact the bodies and lenses are arguably relatively reasonably priced or in some cases especially with the bodies even cheap when compared to similarly spec'd alternatives.
 
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#19
This thread is quite old now and the OP may not return but I just wanted to add a different view to this one just for a bit of balance :D

The Sony A7 series are FF cameras and the lenses are FF sized but there are still compact and reasonably priced options available and the system as a whole arguably isn't all that heavy or expensive when compared to the alternatives. In fact the bodies and lenses are arguably relatively reasonably priced or in some cases especially with the bodies even cheap when compared to similarly spec'd alternatives.
I had similar thoughts, but didn't consider the comment worth a reply for reasons you've already given. Expensive & heavy lenses are a deliberate choice, and one the OP is unlikely to make 'by accident' to end up with inappropriate kit, but even if they did, it would still be an excellent FF camera outfit.
 
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