Dodge and burn ?

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#1
Just wanted some help, never having used film or such things, I understand the term comes from those days.

Is dodge and burn basically using and adjustment brush in lightroom to adjust areas/selective parts or is it more complicated than this ?

Is there an actual dodge/burn tool in LR ?

Excuse my stupidity, but watching a few tutorials and they mention it a few times and I’ve heard the term before but never really thought about it.
 
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Tom
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#3
It’s basically using a brush to selectively lighten or darken areas. It’s much better way of adding contrast to an image than using the contrast slider. You can bring out texture by darkening shadows or accentuate light by brightening it. There are dodge/burn brushes but there are better ways of doing it using blend modes in photoshop.
 

KIPAX

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KIPAX
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#4
I photogrpahed a play on monday...small town stuff... lights al over the place.. when I did wide shot with lots of actors on stage theres spotlights here and there making some actors under a bright light over exposed and some in perfect exposure and some in the dark shadows..... no amount of camera work gets that right when taking the shot.. ...so in Photoshop i used dodge and burn to get the over exposed down and the under exposed up .... handy tool
 
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Damian
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#5
It light room you have black and white and in photoshop you have levels.

These are both called "global adjustments" meaning they effect the whole image. Adding more black or white to create tone. Effectively like adjusting exposure time in a dark room. You can mask areas but generally these are designed to effect the whole image.

Doge(highlight), burn(shadow) and sponge(saturation) are the same tools but designed for local adjustment. Bit brighter here, bit darker there.

In light room you need to set the brush up as either dodge, burn or sponge or all three at once! Where as in photoshop you just need select its strength. In photoshop though this is a destructive action meaning it can only be applied to the image and once saved there is no removing it, unlike light room which you can rewind time.
 
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David
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#11
I think it would be true that the dodge and burn tool in PS is fairly crude and, I suspect, adds or subtracts a number according to settings. It is also destructive in that it permanently alters the image. There are non destructive ways of Dodging and burning in PS though. This is not the same as the process in the darkroom which selectively changes the exposure. The best equivalent is to use the sliders highlights and shadows in LR (or similar) on a Raw file particularly applied with the brush tool (using the exposure slider). Normally, I would carry out any significant tonal adjustments on the Raw file in LR but still occasionally use the Dodge & Burn in PS when I see a few final adjustments needed.

Dave
 
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Jim
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#14
It light room you have black and white and in photoshop you have levels.

These are both called "global adjustments" meaning they effect the whole image. Adding more black or white to create tone. Effectively like adjusting exposure time in a dark room. You can mask areas but generally these are designed to effect the whole image.

Doge(highlight), burn(shadow) and sponge(saturation) are the same tools but designed for local adjustment. Bit brighter here, bit darker there.

In light room you need to set the brush up as either dodge, burn or sponge or all three at once! Where as in photoshop you just need select its strength. In photoshop though this is a destructive action meaning it can only be applied to the image and once saved there is no removing it, unlike light room which you can rewind time.
There are non destructive me5hods of dodging and burning in photoshop. Add 50% grey layer, change layer blend mode to overlay and paint in black and white on this layer.

Sometimes easier to have 2 layers, one for dodge, one for burn.
 
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