Film Photographer of the Year - The shots that didn't make the cut

excalibur2

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Brian
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Flower shots benefit from colour for obvious reasons, but I think black and white allows you to better appreciate the structure of flowers. Textures and component parts oftem make themselves much more apparent when the colour has been removed.
True but erm my brain has been modified from my childhood (common excuse for criminals why not me) o_O :rolleyes: with B\W cinema films, B\W TV, B\W camera film (cheaper than colour) etc ......and it was a relief to see\have colour for those things. ;)
 
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RaglanSurf

RaglanSurf

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Nick
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Well I'm probably narrow minded in my view but to me even if a shot is technically excellent etc... all flower shots should be in colour, well for humans as some insects (e.g. bees) see them in UV etc o_O:rolleyes:
I think Edward Weston, had he still been alive, would disagree.
 
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Steven
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Well I'm probably narrow minded in my view but to me even if a shot is technically excellent etc... all flower shots should be in colour, well for humans as some insects (e.g. bees) see them in UV etc o_O:rolleyes:
I know what you mean, flowers kind of lose something with out their colours but as above I think I'm less interested in showing a photo of the flower and more just playing with the light and composition the fact I'm focusing on a flower is kind of by the by. (besides colour sheet film is eye wateringly expensive!)
 

excalibur2

My F4's Broken...
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Brian
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I think Edward Weston, had he still been alive, would disagree.
Hey Nick..Nige has covered this by saying "but I think black and white allows you to better appreciate the structure of flowers. Textures and component parts oftem make themselves much more apparent when the colour has been removed. " ;)
 
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