Going back to a crop sensor

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8,039
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Robert
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#41
I changed from a D7000 and Sigma 150-600 lens to a G80 and 100-400 lens.
I love the G80 and wouldn't go back.
I know what you mean about all the menu options etc, but I've customised all the buttons to suit my requirements and it's easier to remember which button does what.
 
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Alan
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#42
I never understand the problems people have with menus. Once I've set my camera up I honestly hardly ever use the menus as I only really need them to format the card and change the clock twice a year. Other than those two things I'm honestly struggling to think what I use the menus for.

Still, each to their own and if people don't like the menu a camera has they're free to buy something else.
 
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Andrew
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#43
The G80 images look better than the D7000 because the Nikon sensor is ancient and things have moved on a lot.

I had a D7000 but would never go back to one now.

FWIW I now use M4/3 and enjoy it.

I did the whole Full frame DSLR thing and had a good time with the kit too but a lighter camera bag nowadays is much more preferable to an aching back in the evenings.
Im looking at M4/3rds for the same reason, would like a lighter camera bag, just want to be sure before I commit, thinking of hiring to try out the camera I fancy.

Still haven't decided what to do! :rolleyes:
Have you thought of trying the G9, if you already have the glass for Pano.
 
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Jeff
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#44
Another update from me here , a few weeks ago I had a mad e.bay moment and got a D7200 , and having in the past used both the 7000 and 7100 let me assure you this is one beast of a camera , exceeding all my expectations .. . I still have and use the G80 to ,cant see any good reason to sell that .. now moved the 300s on to help pay for the new one ..
 
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ian-83
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1,499
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Ian
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#45
Im looking at M4/3rds for the same reason, would like a lighter camera bag, just want to be sure before I commit, thinking of hiring to try out the camera I fancy.



Have you thought of trying the G9, if you already have the glass for Pano.
I have looked at the G9 but price puts me off and if I had a body that size I might as well have a bigger sensor in it.

Another update from me here , a few weeks ago I had a mad e.bay moment and got a D7200 , and having in the past used both the 7000 and 7100 let me assure you this is one beast of a camera , exceeding all my expectations .. . I still have and use the G80 to ,cant see any good reason to sell that .. now moved the 300s on to help pay for the new one ..
Looked at D7200 but not sure I want to spend that much. I don't need what it offers over a D7100. But the 7100 over a 7000 is worth the difference I think. Better AF and sensor.
 
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Keith
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#46
I have looked at the G9 but price puts me off and if I had a body that size I might as well have a bigger sensor in it.



Looked at D7200 but not sure I want to spend that much. I don't need what it offers over a D7100. But the 7100 over a 7000 is worth the difference I think. Better AF and sensor.
You're one of those who will just never be satisfied, and I get it, I never am myself but I carry on with what I got in the mean time
 
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19,307
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Alan
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#47
I have looked at the G9 but price puts me off and if I had a body that size I might as well have a bigger sensor in it.
Look at the lenses though. If like me you prefer primes in the 24-85mm equivalent range and zooms in the 24-300mm range you can build a system of compact, light and reasonably priced kit that'll be useable from wide open. Look at APS-C DSLR's though and for some choices you're limited to FF lenses, some of which are aging designs.

The main thing though is that just about anything will very probably be good enough and possibly easily so and if you don't think something is then you can Google your way to examples of what other people are getting with the same kit. That usually telly me that it's me that's the limiting factor :D

I've decided that mirrorless is the way forward for me and I have what I think is a full MFT kit with 17, 25 and 45mm f1.8 primes and zooms covering 12-200mm. I also have a Sony A7 and some compact (for FF) lenses for when I want the best quality I can get and I also have some old film era lenses because I like them :D

You'll have to do some thinking and decide which way you want to go. Good luck deciding and I hope you can settle on a system.
 
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6,898
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Jeff
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#48
Trouble is we ALL have different applications for the same kit .. so what works for my needs won’t for yours .. it comes down to use , weight, speed,price , then add in whether you shoot raw or j.peg and process on a pc or mac . I thought the D300s would suit me but I realised that when I used it previously it was with a diffent lens plus t.c’s and my p.p gear was lower spec , plus the weather was different . .. nostalgia is a two edged sword sometimes it works others it doesn’t
 
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#50
Trouble is we ALL have different applications for the same kit .. so what works for my needs won’t for yours .. it comes down to use , weight, speed,price , then add in whether you shoot raw or j.peg and process on a pc or mac . I thought the D300s would suit me but I realised that when I used it previously it was with a diffent lens plus t.c’s and my p.p gear was lower spec , plus the weather was different . .. nostalgia is a two edged sword sometimes it works others it doesn’t
I must have missed the i between bit,thought you preferred the d300s files,be hard to beat the sensor in the d7200
 
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#51
Saveo
I have looked at the G9 but price puts me off and if I had a body that size I might as well have a bigger sensor in it.



Looked at D7200 but not sure I want to spend that much. I don't need what it offers over a D7100. But the 7100 over a 7000 is worth the difference I think. Better AF and sensor.
save the extra and get the d7200,especially if you do landscapes and pull up the shadows as the d7100 banding is something that has been reported when using that tecnique
 
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#52
If i had a d7100 I wouldn’t buy a D7200 but I would if I had the d7000, but 7100 may be all you need at a decent price
Hmm mpb prices not bad
 
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Tim
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#53
Still haven't decided what to do! :rolleyes:
You’re more indecisive than me! You clearly want to change so just do it, or do something. I’m sure whatever you get you’ll be happy. Then you can swap and change from there without losing too much cash if you swap/change. I’d go for a D7000 at a decent used price. Start taking pics again, and then if you want to upgrade in 6 months you should pretty much recover most of your money back
 
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ian-83
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1,499
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Ian
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#57
You're one of those who will just never be satisfied, and I get it, I never am myself but I carry on with what I got in the mean time
I find myself casually browsing online camera stores when I get bored it's too easy just to pick up the phone and have a quick look online. I do use my camera as much as I can but when I get bored I go looking at other stuff and wonder. I know deep down whatever camera I have the results will most likely be the same.


Look at the lenses though. If like me you prefer primes in the 24-85mm equivalent range and zooms in the 24-300mm range you can build a system of compact, light and reasonably priced kit that'll be useable from wide open. Look at APS-C DSLR's though and for some choices you're limited to FF lenses, some of which are aging designs.

The main thing though is that just about anything will very probably be good enough and possibly easily so and if you don't think something is then you can Google your way to examples of what other people are getting with the same kit. That usually telly me that it's me that's the limiting factor :D

I've decided that mirrorless is the way forward for me and I have what I think is a full MFT kit with 17, 25 and 45mm f1.8 primes and zooms covering 12-200mm. I also have a Sony A7 and some compact (for FF) lenses for when I want the best quality I can get and I also have some old film era lenses because I like them :D

You'll have to do some thinking and decide which way you want to go. Good luck deciding and I hope you can settle on a system.
Mirrorless bodies do have some great features which is why I was drawn to them in the first place and you can easily build up a small but affordable system which covers most focal lengths.

Trouble is we ALL have different applications for the same kit .. so what works for my needs won’t for yours .. it comes down to use , weight, speed,price , then add in whether you shoot raw or j.peg and process on a pc or mac . I thought the D300s would suit me but I realised that when I used it previously it was with a diffent lens plus t.c’s and my p.p gear was lower spec , plus the weather was different . .. nostalgia is a two edged sword sometimes it works others it doesn’t
my needs tend to be all-round. I don't stick to one genre I like to have a go at everything really.

You’re more indecisive than me! You clearly want to change so just do it, or do something. I’m sure whatever you get you’ll be happy. Then you can swap and change from there without losing too much cash if you swap/change. I’d go for a D7000 at a decent used price. Start taking pics again, and then if you want to upgrade in 6 months you should pretty much recover most of your money back
I find when it comes to any tech I become quite indecisive. There's too much choice out there and everything has its merits and cons. I probably spend too much time looking at stuff instead of using what I have.


I'd stick with your gut feeling
That changes hourly!!
 
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Alan
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#58
I find when it comes to any tech I become quite indecisive. There's too much choice out there and everything has its merits and cons. I probably spend too much time looking at stuff instead of using what I have.

That changes hourly!!
I don't know what your budget is but if you go for used kit maybe there's scope to have two systems to go some way to satisfy the GAS, give you lots of interest and also keep the budget down? :D Maybe an APS-C DSLR and a mirrorless camera are possible? One as a more or less full kit for your needs and the other a bit more limited but specialised in some way?
 
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10,299
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Keith
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#61
I find myself casually browsing online camera stores when I get bored it's too easy just to pick up the phone and have a quick look online. I do use my camera as much as I can but when I get bored I go looking at other stuff and wonder. I know deep down whatever camera I have the results will most likely be the same.
I hear ya! I've changed systems completely a number of times, I get settled in for a year or 2 max then I'm off searching again. There's no harm in it so long as you remember, it's all just gear end of the day Cliche or not, it's true! End results matter most, but of course we want to have the best set up tailored to our individual tastes to make the process comfy along the way.

I'm mid-shift again, looking to broaden my horizons so I too am back looking at gear reviews and what's on sale, what might suit my current mood more even. I know it doesn't matter what I'm using, I'll try make the best of it, but sometimes newer gear can inspire. I'd suggest looking to what might be most comfortable for your liking first, because end results don't actually vary that much between systems nowadays. If you can't get to camera stores to handle the gear physically then you're relying on watching reviews and trying to imagine how that gear feels in hand etc ... I have to do same, once I hone in on a certain body for example, I'll watch about 20 different videos on it, looking to see how different photographers found the ergonomics, physical controls etc ... it can be a long drawn out process
 
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David
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#75
I went from 5DIII to Fuji four or five years back, and while objectively it made for a lot smaller kit, with minimal difference to the pictures, and I was genuinely happy with the output at the time, when I would look back over older pics, I could't help but feel there was something missing, so much so I recently switched back to FF with Sony.

My head tells me there's no real difference between the images I took on my Fuji XH-1 and 56 f/1.2 compared to my Sony A7III and 84 f/1.4 for example (strict 'equivalence values' aside), but it was a nagging doubt, so my heart would tell me something was missing. I don't regret my 5 years with Fuji at all, but the niggle would not go away, and so I'm back! It could be just a itch to try a new system, but rightly or wrongly, the sensor size played a part in that decision.

One thing my previous switch from Canon to Fuji did cement in me was the move to mirrorless (hence the Sony). Nothing to do with size (it's not the camera that's heavy it's the lenses, and they are the same for FF regardless of which system), more to do with the utility and focus accuracy etc.
 
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ian-83
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Ian
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#76
I hear ya! I've changed systems completely a number of times, I get settled in for a year or 2 max then I'm off searching again. There's no harm in it so long as you remember, it's all just gear end of the day Cliche or not, it's true! End results matter most, but of course we want to have the best set up tailored to our individual tastes to make the process comfy along the way.

I'm mid-shift again, looking to broaden my horizons so I too am back looking at gear reviews and what's on sale, what might suit my current mood more even. I know it doesn't matter what I'm using, I'll try make the best of it, but sometimes newer gear can inspire. I'd suggest looking to what might be most comfortable for your liking first, because end results don't actually vary that much between systems nowadays. If you can't get to camera stores to handle the gear physically then you're relying on watching reviews and trying to imagine how that gear feels in hand etc ... I have to do same, once I hone in on a certain body for example, I'll watch about 20 different videos on it, looking to see how different photographers found the ergonomics, physical controls etc ... it can be a long drawn out process
Sounds very much like me, I get an itch after around a year or two and unless scratched doesn't go away. It's definitely hard to get a camera these days which takes a bad photo. Anything released in the last 5-10 years produces results good enough for me.
 
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Mike
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#77
After shooting Canon for over 30 years, I'm now 100% Sony with the a7rii and a6300.
I came to Sony from Canon via m4/3 (Olympus EM-1)
Loved the m4/3 and was running the 2 systems for a while but trading the Oly for a used a6300 made more sense - same battery and lens mount.

I seem to use the cropped sensor a6300 more than the FF a7rii, both of which produce great results.
I think my a6300 images are better than the m4/3 but that pixel peeping to be honest
 
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10,299
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Keith
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#78
After shooting Canon for over 30 years, I'm now 100% Sony with the a7rii and a6300.
I came to Sony from Canon via m4/3 (Olympus EM-1)
Loved the m4/3 and was running the 2 systems for a while but trading the Oly for a used a6300 made more sense - same battery and lens mount.

I seem to use the cropped sensor a6300 more than the FF a7rii, both of which produce great results.
I think my a6300 images are better than the m4/3 but that pixel peeping to be honest
Using the same settings and similar lenses I'm sure the 6300 does produce better default images, but it depends on what you shoot too. If you mostly shoot still subjects like me, then the difference is negated because IBIS can be so beneficial. It can be the difference of 4-5 stops - this can be the difference between ISO 6400 and 400! [using the same SS] Then the M43 is going to look a lot better in that case.
 
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