Beginner Help needed using lens mount adapter, Olympus OM lens to Canon DSLR body.

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#1
Introductory preamble.
I have just got myself a Canon 200D DSLR. The last (apart from a cheap & cheerful digtal camera I got in Lidl's about 12 years ago) camera I had was a Olympus OM4, which I had substantial kit for, mostly stuff for macro photograhy. Haven't keept up with developments in camera technology for about 25 years - the manual for my OM4 is 60 pages A6 size, in English, German, French & Spanish. The manual for the 200D is 400 pages A5 size and entirely in English. Learning curve: straight up into the clouds!

The matter at hand.
I have a lens mount adapter Olympus OM lens to Canon DLSR body. What should the camera settings be to close the apeture down when taking a photo. I've tried various things myself, checked youtube videos etc.

I'm rather out of my depth at the moment.

Thanks!
 
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#2
The camera will not close down the aperture. Your adapter should do this - when you alter the aperture on the lens, it should immediately close down. Attempting to alter the aperture with the camera controls will have no effect at all - in fact, the aperture should not be displayed. Your camera will then meter the scene with the closed down aperture and select the shutter speed (you need to be in Av or Auto).
 
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#3
Thanks for the reply @john.maretts.
Solved! I wasn't turning the lens fully home on the adapter. It's a tight fit, rather awkward and a bit scarry the force needed to turn it fully home.

Hopefully won't be too long for me to work out how to configure the 200D into OM4 'simulation mode'.
 
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Gareth
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#4
I have Olympus OM 50mm f1.8 and 135mm f3.5 lenses which I occasionally adapt to my Canon crop sensor cameras, and mine is a tight fit too.

I usually use manual mode, and auto ISO, then use the cameras meter to judge shutter speed/aperture etc., to keep the ISO as low as possible.

You can't be in a hurry with older manual lenses, but taking time over a shot is half the fun in my opinion.:)
 
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droj
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#5
Focus wide open - the focus screen obviously won't be anything as bright as an OM one, and will lack split image etc, so you'll be a bit handicapped but hopefully your eyesight is good?

Stop down to meter and take - without losing focus!

It would all be easier on a digital body with an evf (eg a full-frame Sony), where you can judge the exposure directly in the display since the vf is wysiwyg - coupled with focus peaking.
 
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