Hiking rucksack vs camera rucksack

Messages
38
Name
Michael
Edit My Images
Yes
#1
Another backpack related post, but with a different emphasis. I think I'd describe myself as a mountain hiker with a side-helping of photographer rather than the other way round, it's one of the reasons I've gone down the M43 route (and I'm exceedingly happy with that decision).
As my kit is expanding (tripod, filter kit, uwa, telephoto...), I'm beginning to run out of space in my standard day pack. I've been looking at dedicated camera rucksacks, but find that they all seem to be a bit of a compromise vis a vis hiking rucksacks (as well as costing an arm and a leg). Do any of you have much experience with day hiking with camera rucksacks? Anything you'd recommend? Any features you wouldn't do without?
I'm tending towards a slightly bigger standard rucksack but perhaps with a third party insert.
Any thoughts?
 
Messages
7,038
Name
Ken
Edit My Images
Yes
#2
I'd go with a standard hiking rucksack as you need the space for your hiking essentials.
Your safety, health, food and water requirements come first. With camera rucksacks the camera comes first with less useful space for your hiking needs.
At least, that was what I found in my hiking days.
 
Messages
222
Edit My Images
No
#3
I use a front loading 50+5 litre hiking rucksack with an insert. Plenty of room for the camera gear and everything else I usually take with me. I think with your requirements, I'd go with the hiking rucksack.
 

sirch

Official Forum Numpty 2015
Messages
8,210
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
#4
I'm tending towards a slightly bigger standard rucksack but perhaps with a third party insert.
Absolutely the right thing to do, especially for M43. The dedicated camera rucksacks that do leave room for non camera gear tend to give too much camera space for m43 gear. There are loads of good inserts on Amazon/Ebay.
 
Messages
3,980
Name
Dave
Edit My Images
Yes
#5
Agree with going for a normal hiking rucksack with an insert. There are lots of inserts on the Bay and although they give the sizes, IMO it would be a good idea to buy the inserts first so you can be sure they fit any rucksack you are considering buying. Even though good hiking rucksacks aren't cheap I think some of the prices for dedicated camera rucksacks are excessive. There is also the slight advantage that a normal rucksack probably isn't as attractive to a thief.

Dave
 
Messages
943
Edit My Images
Yes
#6
I use a deuter trail 30 with a peak design cube insert medium size. The deuter trails can be found very cheap at the moment. I can access the camera from the front zips. It can fit a fuji xpro2, the biggish 50-200 2.8 attached to the body if required, the 10-24 and enough room for a couple more lenses. There is space in the top for a waterproof and insulated jacket squished in with some food. It will take a water pouch. I've had a largish tripod strapped horizontally under the pack or carry a lighter tripod vertically with the legs in the bottle holder. I've tried many rucksack options but needed something versatile as sometimes you want less camera kit but more hiking stuff or visa versa. Important sometimes when dragging the kids up a hill.
 
Messages
11,320
Name
Rich
Edit My Images
Yes
#10
Tenba BYOB inserts are worth looking at as well
They certainly are, I've been using the BYOB 9 for the past year and can get a surprising amount in it.
Can also get a dedicated fold up shoulder bag to put it in should you just want to wander around town or suchlike.
Mine currently contains a Panasonic GX9 with 25mm f/1.4 attached, Oly 12mm and 17mm plus screw on 46mm hood that fits all three lenses,
spare battery, spare SD card, mini rocket blower, small Arca q/r Plate, Lenspen, lens cloth, card reader, Hoya CPL, USB Lead and iPhone 4s.

That's my travel kit and it goes in my rucksack along with a travel tripod.
Last trip just before Easter to the Netherlands I only took the camera with Oly 12-40mm, fitted in easily
Going to see if I can get the 35-100 f/2.8 in with the last option, might be a bit ambitious though.
 
Last edited:
Messages
4,379
Name
David
Edit My Images
Yes
#11
They certainly are, I've been using the BYOB 9 for the past year and can get a surprising amount in it.
Can also get a dedicated fold up shoulder bag to put it in should you just want to wander around town or suchlike.
Mine currently contains a Panasonic GX9 with 25mm f/1.4 attached, Oly 12mm and 17mm plus screw on 46mm hood that fits all three lenses,
spare battery, spare SD card, mini rocket blower, small Arca q/r Plate, Lenspen, lens cloth, card reader, Hoya CPL, USB Lead and iPhone 4s.

That's my travel kit and it goes in my rucksack along with a travel tripod.
Last trip just before Easter to the Netherlands I only took the camera with Oly 12-40mm, fitted in easily
Going to see if I can get the 35-100 f/2.8 in with the last option, might be a bit ambitious though.
I have a couple of different sized ones, just take the one that suits the day/gear best
 
Messages
1,248
Name
Lee
Edit My Images
Yes
#12
I have a Manfrotto Off Road 30L

I don't use it often. Depends how far we are hiking & what the conditions are. It's certainly enough for all my Sony stuff, food, drink, waterproofs, coat, gloves etc Only think it' snot great for carrying a tripod on....
 
Messages
7,038
Name
Ken
Edit My Images
Yes
#13
Some hiking rucksacks come with ice axe loops - mine has space for two axes.
I use them for a tripod now :)
 
Messages
2
Name
Dave
Edit My Images
Yes
#14
Although I acknowledge that this an expensive option, but I’ve been in the same situation for quite some time.

I live on the Isle of Lewis, where it’s rugged wet and windy! I’ve been using a ThinkTank Airport Essentials, but I have to admit that it’s better suited to less demanding environments. Here on the islands, I’ve used both Vaude and Grivel walking rucksacks with internal protection for my Olympus M43 kit.

But, whilst OK, neither of these are ideal. Now I can get to what I think is my solution (and the expensive reference), I bought myself a Gitzo Adventury 30L rucksack. Wow! It ticks plenty of boxes for me, and the roll top compartment works just as it should, plenty of space, but compresses as required. Also, the photographic compartment is removable, this helps when I need to clean and/or dry the main body. It works for me

Have a look at the reviews and see what you think.

I hope that helps
 
Messages
264
Edit My Images
Yes
#15
In the same position myself. Looking at rucksacks 50l plus for full day hike with side loops for tripod and more importantly a lower separate front a accessed zipped pocket for camera. Means quick a cess without having to unpack rucksack each time.
 
Messages
588
Name
Darryl
Edit My Images
No
#16
Another backpack related post, but with a different emphasis. I think I'd describe myself as a mountain hiker with a side-helping of photographer rather than the other way round, it's one of the reasons I've gone down the M43 route (and I'm exceedingly happy with that decision).
As my kit is expanding (tripod, filter kit, uwa, telephoto...), I'm beginning to run out of space in my standard day pack. I've been looking at dedicated camera rucksacks, but find that they all seem to be a bit of a compromise vis a vis hiking rucksacks (as well as costing an arm and a leg). Do any of you have much experience with day hiking with camera rucksacks? Anything you'd recommend? Any features you wouldn't do without?
I'm tending towards a slightly bigger standard rucksack but perhaps with a third party insert.
Any thoughts?
I think I'm in a similar position. I like to hike and camp, but take my Nikon (D810) with me with lens and tripod.

I went for an Osprey Exos 58 which can take all my camping gear, plus tripod, I then have a Think Tank holster (https://www.thinktankphoto.com/collections/belt-systems-digital-holsters ) with the chest rig attachment (https://www.thinktankphoto.com/coll...-holsters/products/digital-holster-harness-v2) this allows me quick access to my camera when walking, with the ability to put it away when needed.

The only other thing to affect your hands are poles, the Exos 58 has a stow loop for poles so you can pop them away when you need to get the camera out.

I'm quite please with this set-up, only disadvantage I've found so far is the digital holster can block your feet a little, but it has not cause me any significant issues so far.

On a side not, with regards to the camera, I also attached a set of Lee grads to the side of the digital holster with a big & little stopper in the front stretchy pocket and the adaptor holder just kept on the lens, I find this gives great flexibility.

Hope this helps.
 
Messages
3,652
Name
Ian
Edit My Images
No
#17
Go Atlas or go home... :)
https://www.talkphotography.co.uk/threads/atlas-bags.687631/

Seriously though, I've had this bag for over a year and it's taken everything I've thrown at it. Super comfy, and I've never filled it.

I did have a Dakine poacher with insert but the insert took up most of the pack leaving very little room for lunch, waterproofs, flask and all the other bits & pieces you take on a day out. It was also quite a "small" fit.
 
Messages
309
Edit My Images
Yes
#18
I got a Lowe Alpine Air back from Go outdoors and a tenba insert, its great, bit of a faff getting the gear out sometimes but no great shakes. the comfort when walking out weighs that issue for me, enough room for waterproofs and padded jacket etc. wish i'd done it years ago.
 
Messages
744
Name
terry
Edit My Images
Yes
#19
I have Osprey Kestrel rucksack that is very comfortable to wear I have ordered the tenba byo 13 from speed graphic today for £34 so I will try this insert with the Kestrel which is 48 ltrs so will still have room for wet weather gear water food etc. I have used this set up for 6 months and it ticks my boxes
 
Messages
170
Name
Ben
Edit My Images
Yes
#20
I bought a fancy and expensive Lowepro Whistler 350 a couple of years ago. Recently sold it as it was too heavy and didnt leave enough room for walking gear and clothes after the camera space. Ended up purchasing a Deuter hiking rucksack. It is half the weight of the Lowepro when both empty and has a sleeping bag compartment at the top which acts as a useful access to a camera insert without unpacking the whole bag. It also has ice pick and walking stick attachments that are good for a tripod.

The only benefit of a camera bag is to have a back accesible camera insert. I cant really see any benefit over a decent walking bag if it has a back or bottom opening sleeping bag compartment.
 
Messages
1,175
Name
John
Edit My Images
Yes
#21
I'm going down this route of non camera bag, gone with the decathlon forclaz 50, tried one of my camera inserts in it and it fits perfectly.

The fact it opens like a suitcase really helps so it's nice and easy access
 
Messages
783
Name
Justin
Edit My Images
No
#22
Another backpack related post, but with a different emphasis. I think I'd describe myself as a mountain hiker with a side-helping of photographer rather than the other way round, it's one of the reasons I've gone down the M43 route (and I'm exceedingly happy with that decision).
As my kit is expanding (tripod, filter kit, uwa, telephoto...), I'm beginning to run out of space in my standard day pack. I've been looking at dedicated camera rucksacks, but find that they all seem to be a bit of a compromise vis a vis hiking rucksacks (as well as costing an arm and a leg). Do any of you have much experience with day hiking with camera rucksacks? Anything you'd recommend? Any features you wouldn't do without?
I'm tending towards a slightly bigger standard rucksack but perhaps with a third party insert.
Any thoughts?
Have you looked at the Atlas athlete?
 
OP
OP
Kaltenberg Mike
Messages
38
Name
Michael
Edit My Images
Yes
#23
Have you looked at the Atlas athlete?
Oooph - I have now, that's a handsome price. In the end I went for an Osprey Stratos 36 - around €120 plus a Hama Pittsburgh camera bag as a removable insert (€45). I use a Micro 4/3 camera, so all the gear ends up being a bit smaller. Thanks for the feedback though.
 
Top