1. Thekillerqueen88

    Thekillerqueen88

    Messages:
    8
    Name:
    Mark
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Hi all,

    I have been taking photos for a couple of years now, and share them on my instagram pages and Faceboon page.

    I’d like to start selling prints etc, but I have no idea how to get started. Despite having around 400 followers on Facebook, I don’t class them as “active followers”.

    How do you get to that point where will people retain interest?


    Insta: MCastlePhotograhpy

    FB: https://m.facebook.com/MCastlePh0t0graphy/

    Any advice and guidance would be most appreciated. I am not looking at making it more than just a hobby, howerver getting a little something from it helps with motivation etc. I also need a bigger lens :D

    Thanks!
     
  2. Phil V

    Phil V

    Messages:
    21,821
    Name:
    Phil
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Don’t be mistaken; the simple and honest answer is...

    Shoot something people will want to buy

    Put it in front of those people and make it easy for them to find.

    Don’t be disheartened, but I need to say...
    There’s nothing hugely ‘wrong’ with your images (though on 2nd look they’re not great either*), but I can’t imagine the general public wanting to buy them.

    *Who do you think the market is for a duck with missing feet, unremarkable images of a herd of deer, or an unsharp kite?
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
  3. GreenNinja67

    GreenNinja67

    Messages:
    3,612
    Name:
    Terry
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Get a proper website.

    I managed to work out how to view your Facebook cover photo without it being pixellated to buggery but it took a while.

    Try Wix or Squarespace for some template ideas.
     
  4. Phil V

    Phil V

    Messages:
    21,821
    Name:
    Phil
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Don’t!

    You haven’t got images people would clamour to buy.

    Spend some time researching what people will buy, then learn how to create them...


    Then get a website (if you think it’ll help your customers)
     
    juggler and omens like this.
  5. Nawty

    Nawty

    Messages:
    6,215
    Name:
    Ned
    Edit My Images:
    Yes

    This.

    You only have to look through the various photo sections on here or flickr to see the massive volume of super high quality of work that is prevalent in the amateur world, hardly any of these people have ever sold anything, ever.
     
    omens, Mr Badger and petersmart like this.
  6. RichardC27

    RichardC27

    Messages:
    2,518
    Name:
    Richard
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    What about your current lens is holding you back? Learn to get the best out of the equipment you have before dropping a load of cash on new gear or a fancy website. As others have said, there's nothing especially wrong with your photos, but really think about your composition. Your header picture on Facebook is a landscape photo that isn't level. There's a photo of a duck in your wildlife section with its feet missing. The howling wolf shot is fine but there's a fence behind it that shows it was clearly taken in a zoo. If I'm going to buy a print of a howling wolf I want it to at least look like it was taken in the wild. Work on your photography and processing until you get images that people would be willing to buy.
     
    Mr Badger and petersmart like this.
  7. petersmart

    petersmart

    Messages:
    4,470
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    No matter how good your photos may be if you are trying to sell them you need to make them really stand out.

    Being able to take a good photograph is no guarantee of selling it especially if you are competing with shedloads of free stuff.

    After all I can get thousands of free photos from Unsplash which are totally excellent and I can use as I wish:

    https://unsplash.com

    Look at the photos on Flickr and on here and ask yourself is you can produce work just as good - or better.

    I think I am a reasonable photographer but some of the photographers on here just blow me away with the sheer quality of their work.

    Some of my "Liquid Art" shots ( pretentious? moi?) might have a small market but I doubt if I could make a living selling just these kind of images:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/20926615@N05/albums/72157625137872065



    5141848903_86119c9b38_o (2).jpg

    5129496399_5cb9f58c6e_o.jpg


    I also have some reasonable landscapes but again why would anyone buy them?
    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
    goinggreynow and Mr Badger like this.
  8. marat stepanoff

    marat stepanoff

    Messages:
    3
    Name:
    Marat
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Everyone wants to know HOW to sell their art. But no one wants to tell how to sell.
     
    Phil V likes this.
  9. Scirocco_09

    Scirocco_09

    Messages:
    751
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Win major photography competitions or become a YouTube star. If you’re good enough and lucky enough competition success will boost your profile and people will buy prints of your winning shot/s, but don’t think it’ll bring in anything more than a bit of extra pocket money. I expect it’s a similar thing with YouTube though you can make your own fame. I’ve looked on your Instagram and you shoot all sorts, it’s best that you become known for one or two things, eg landscape and wildlife photography and build your ‘brand’ around that. I’m sorry to say but your pictures don’t grab me, work on shooting in better light and work on more engaging compositions
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018
  10. Phil V

    Phil V

    Messages:
    21,821
    Name:
    Phil
    Edit My Images:
    No
    That’s because there’s no winning formula beyond ‘research your market’. Business advice is complex, otherwise every burger van would be on its way to being Mac Donald’s. ;)

    It’s not that there’s a ‘secret’ just that every successful business only knows what worked for them*, not that it’s a repeatable formula that’s work for others.

    * and if we’re honest... a lot of successful businesses couldn’t even explain what made them successful, let alone how it might work for someone else.
     
  11. ashtennisguru

    ashtennisguru

    Messages:
    1,124
    Edit My Images:
    No
    @Thekillerqueen88 I'm in no way a pro or someone who makes money from photography, but I have sold a small number of prints. The best advice I can give you is to shoot images that people look at and go "wow, I couldn't have shot that".

    I don't wish to be harsh, but when I look at the majority of your images I see photos that had I given my wife or my daughter a camera or a phone even they would have probably come back with the same image.

    If you want to sell prints you want to be creating imagery that a lay person couldn't, by being in places they can't, in light that they couldn't find, capturing interesting moments that they couldn't see, processing images in a way that takes them beyond a snapshot. As an example, would I buy a landscape print from Thomas Heaton - potentially yes. He shoots interesting images, only when the light is great, in parts of the world that I will probably never get to - he offers something different.

    Once you have a portfolio of 10 or so cracking images, then you could look at getting a website and finding other ways of getting your images in front of people, but get the quality wirk ready first.

    Hope that helps and again, sorry if it seems harsh.
     
  12. juggler

    juggler

    Messages:
    4,362
    Name:
    Simon
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Random selling via the internet is probably the hardest way to do it. I have done it - but I'm not going to be retiring on the profits.
    You might have more joy selling via a market stall or cafe exhibition space.
    Even a dedicated exhibition in a gallery is hard work when it comes to selling. It has to be the right gallery in the right location, and then you need to get the right people in to it.

    If your work is distinctive then it will do half of the selling for you. To make distinctive stuff you need to specialise - and get good at your specialism.

    The easiest way to do that is to shoot to order! Not sure that really applies with general scenic stuff though.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2018
    Phil V likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice