Long Exposure and Camera Straps.

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321
Name
Andy
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#1
Hi Guys just a quick one... Sometimes I find myself out with my camera with the strap and see an opportunity for long exposure... However as soon as I tripod mount it feels like my camera strap is some kind of parachute attracting every bit of wind!
And getting a camera strap off and back on for me takes a diagram like tieing a Windsor knot! How do you guys combat the camera strap under long exposure or astrophotography shots?
 
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Name
Jan
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#4
Get the Peak Design anchor/adaptor kit and you can quick release the strap whenever you want. However I normally keep a light hold of whatever strap is on the camera when it's tripod mounted, just in case the tripod goes over. For astrophotography I'm using an equatorial mount where the camera can end up in some strange places, so the neck strap gets wound round something so if anything comes loose it can't fall far.
 
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321
Name
Andy
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#6
Thanks I'll have a look... The next step is to stop my camera knocking my son in the head when I pick him up... The amount of times the poor little guys had a lens on the back of his head is unreal
 
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Dave
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#9
I just loop mine over the camera and tripod once or twice so that it can't flap in the wind
Exactly this :agree:

Easy peasy and far easier, and cheaper, than a quick release strap

And you're right too that tripod, mirror up, and remote release is all negated by a flappy strap - yet I've seen some landscape vloggers doing exactly that! Pillocks :D

Dave
 
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8,155
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wayne clarke
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#10
I just wrap the strap around the tripod head or handle. Not a fan of quick release straps after have one come undone and dropping my camera and 28-80 lens down on the road once.
 
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Graham
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#11
I use a black rapid strap now but I’m more in the habit of just leaving the strap off unless I need it rather than the other way around. Screws on in a few seconds when it’s needed.
 
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peter
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#13
I tend to use a Joby sling strap that mounts on to the tripod "screw", so that means you have to take the strap off to put it on the tripod.
I have one of them which I find great with my 200-500 etc. and like you say on a tripod it makes sense as you have to take it off :)
 
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Lee
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#14
I just wrap mine around the tripod too in some fashion. I have been thinking about a Peak Design Slide Lite but I'm not fully convinced yet........

I could probably get away with no strap at all as I rarely walk with the camera around my neck anyway come to think of it!!
 
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Richard
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#15
Wind is the number one enemy of tripod photography. For maximum stability, don't use the centre-column and reduce the tripod height if possible.

Even a slight breeze will nibble away at sharpness, especially with longer lenses. Big filter system attachments like Lee etc can also act like a sail. Check for wind buffeting in live view on max magnification and you can sometimes see the image moving. In which case, use image stabilisation and mirror lock-up.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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31,768
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#16
Don't some cameras (or lenses) disable stabilisation when tripod mounted?

When I'm shooting on a tripod, I usually wind the strap round the legs unless it's windy, in which case I'll hold on to it for the duration of the exposure. I'll generally check the image afterwards to see if there is any visible camera shake and reshoot if necessary.
 
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Richard
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#17
Don't some cameras (or lenses) disable stabilisation when tripod mounted?

When I'm shooting on a tripod, I usually wind the strap round the legs unless it's windy, in which case I'll hold on to it for the duration of the exposure. I'll generally check the image afterwards to see if there is any visible camera shake and reshoot if necessary.
Some do.

It's commonly recommended to switch off image stabilisation when using a tripod as when the camera is perfectly stationary a feedback loop can develop in the system which causes movement of its own. Some older IS systems, eg Canon 100-400 Mk1, are very prone to this. Newer systems are much better and some have 'tripod sensing' that basically means they switch themselves off when there's zero movement, and will reactivate if wind buffet is detected, but this can't happen if you've already switched everything off.

There aren't really any hard and fast rules as systems vary and of course situations vary a great deal. FWIW my own rough rule of thumb is to leave IS on whenever there's a hand on the camera, eg monopod or gimbal, and also with long longer lenses if there's any kind of breeze.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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31,768
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#18
Glad my memory's working (almost!) right.

TBH, I usually forget to switch VR/OIS off (because I'd forget to switch it back on...) for tripod shots but then again, any tripod shots will tend to be at long focal lengths so camera wobble is possible anyway. Not sure if the Fuji 100-400 or Nikkor 70-300 are too bothered but I seem to get decent enough results for my needs!
 
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Neil Sweeting
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#19
Due to a health condition I need to use either a neck or wrist strap on my camera as I can loose all feeling & grip in my hands so if using the wrist strap which is the one I normally use it just gets placed over the head on the trip & it hasn't caused any issues at all even in strong wind & with the neck strap it get wound around the tripod head a few times again this has never caused me any problems with long exposure shots
 
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1,046
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#20
If you need a strap then the Peak Design system is good for easy removal.

I tend not to use a strap at all when out on a hike/landscape shoot, the camera normally goes from bag to tripod or if I'm wondering around I just hand carry it. If i'm going to fall the camera is going with me whether it's on a strap or not.
 
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1,302
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Jonathan
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#21
As with a couple of previous posters, I use the OpTech straps, so simple undo the quick release and the bulk of the strap is disconnected.

Note: I've never had a quick release connector fail, but have had my young daughter ask "What's this do?" as she squeezed the release clip...
Fortunately, I use the dual harness, which connects to the camera at both strap lugs - and stays on me even when the camera is disconnected, so all that happened was my camera suddenly dangled a bit lower than normal...
 
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1,146
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Peter
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#22
Wind is the number one enemy of tripod photography. For maximum stability, don't use the centre-column and reduce the tripod height if possible.

Even a slight breeze will nibble away at sharpness, especially with longer lenses. Big filter system attachments like Lee etc can also act like a sail. Check for wind buffeting in live view on max magnification and you can sometimes see the image moving. In which case, use image stabilisation and mirror lock-up.
Even worse when you have an oldish Tilt head on tripd which is straining with the weight of camera and lens in vertical format and even though I can splash out on camera and lens an L-bracket is such an extravagance.....I was doing a shot 8 weeks ago on Tower Bridge and couldn't focus as the camera was being buffeted - not as if it was a windy day either.
 
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Name
Lee
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#23
Even worse when you have an oldish Tilt head on tripd which is straining with the weight of camera and lens in vertical format and even though I can splash out on camera and lens an L-bracket is such an extravagance.....I was doing a shot 8 weeks ago on Tower Bridge and couldn't focus as the camera was being buffeted - not as if it was a windy day either.
I bought an L Bracket from China - under £8 iirc. Probably the best accessory I've ever bought......!
 
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Name
Conrad
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#27
Hi Guys just a quick one... Sometimes I find myself out with my camera with the strap and see an opportunity for long exposure... However as soon as I tripod mount it feels like my camera strap is some kind of parachute attracting every bit of wind!
And getting a camera strap off and back on for me takes a diagram like tieing a Windsor knot! How do you guys combat the camera strap under long exposure or astrophotography shots?
Thanks I'll have a look... The next step is to stop my camera knocking my son in the head when I pick him up... The amount of times the poor little guys had a lens on the back of his head is unreal
I use a Blackrapid strap, which avoids both these issues.

I have an Arca type quick release plate permanently attached tightly to the camera rather than use the bracket that comes with the Blackrapid strap.
The Blackrapid strap then attaches via its clip to the D ring on the Arca plate. Note - it's important to ensure the D ring on the Arca plate is very tight so it doesn't work loose (I've done this for years without any issue).

When using a tripod, you have to simply unclip the Blackrapid strap from the D ring (very quick) and use the Arca plate to attach to the tripod.

The other advantage of the Blackrapid strap is that it is easiest and most comfortable to use it over your head and slung across your body - so when not holding the camera, it naturally hangs upside down by your side, under/below one arm, with the lens pointing backwards (so well away from being a danger to to any young person you may need to pick up). The fact it hangs upside down also means it's no problem if you have a flashgun attached - even with a diffuser.

As the clip holding the camera is free to slide along the strap, when you grab the camera and hold it up, the strap stays fairly static and the camera and clip slide easily up to your eye. This setup also has the advantage that if you need to carry 2 cameras you can sling them securely across opposite sides of your head so each is easily accessible at any time, but they are in no danger of banging into each other when not in use, as they hang at opposite sides of your body.

One other bonus is that when you're not holding the camera, it is well out of the way (and will sit under a jacket if wearing one), so is far more discreet than having a big camera poking out resting on your chest/stomach.
 
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