Beginner Long exposure and remote shutter release.

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Brian
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#1
I have read several times on TP and elsewhere that if using a long exposure, in addition to a tripod, you should use a remote shutter release.

I don't understand why, because if it is a long exposure then surely there would not be sufficient light to register any camera movement at the moment you manually operated the shutter release. Clearly there is something I am not getting. What is it?:thinking:
 
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Mandy
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#2
Because of the risk of camera movement, the camera is most often mounted on a tripod for the duration of the exposure. While it's generally possible to use the shutter release button on the camera itself, a cable release or electronic remote is often used to further eliminate the risk of shaking the camera during the long exposure. The cable releases generally include a locking feature to eliminate the need to keep the button or plunger depressed during extremely long exposures.
 

MWHCVT

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#3
I have read several times on TP and elsewhere that if using a long exposure, in addition to a tripod, you should use a remote shutter release.

I don't understand why, because if it is a long exposure then surely there would not be sufficient light to register any camera movement at the moment you manually operated the shutter release. Clearly there is something I am not getting. What is it?:thinking:
Any movement no matter how minor is bad is the simple reason, plus it will enable you to exceed the 30 second limit by using bulb, if your using a programmed exposure length eg 10, 15, 20 or 30 seconds as examples then of course you can use the shutter delay inbuilt into the camera to get past needing a trigger...

However not using a trigger means you'll not have full control over your camera for long exposures, obviously it's not always affect you however there will be those occasions it will cost you a shot and for the price of a trigger its really not worth the lost shot

Also bright lights will show up the initial vibration even if the rest of the scene still looks sharp
 
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BBR
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#4
I hadn't thought about about bulb exposure, so I get that thank you. I can also see the point about bright lights, which I suppose could also include stars.
I always use a tripod and remote release anyway, I just wasnt sure if the remote was always necessary. Thnx
 

MWHCVT

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#5
I hadn't thought about about bulb exposure, so I get that thank you. I can also see the point about bright lights, which I suppose could also include stars.
I always use a tripod and remote release anyway, I just wasnt sure if the remote was always necessary. Thnx
No worries, I'd say I am one few members that uses triggers for probably 90% of my shooting if not more, as far as I'm concerned there are certainly times where a trigger isn't essential but life is always easier with one if your on a tripod...(y)
 

MWHCVT

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#7
You can always set a 2 second timer if you don't want to invest in a remote shutter.
Only up to 30 seconds and even then that is only of limited use (y)
 

StewartR

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#9
Yes but it does solve the problem of camera movement when pressing the shutter.
But only when you want a shutter speed which you can dial in on the camera, ie up to 30 seconds. Longer shutter speeds require the use of B mode and then the self timer can't be used.
 
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#10
I have used the timer but it's a right faf and is of course limited to 30 seconds. A cheap remote lead with a lock on is less than a fiver from the bay.
 
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#11
No worries, I'd say I am one few members that uses triggers for probably 90% of my shooting if not more, as far as I'm concerned there are certainly times where a trigger isn't essential but life is always easier with one if your on a tripod...(y)
I'm with you on that, always off a tripod, always with a cable release, for my landscapes, interiors and architectural work.
 

Nod

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#12
Always OFF a tripod or always ON one?
 
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#14
I have read several times on TP and elsewhere that if using a long exposure, in addition to a tripod, you should use a remote shutter release.

I don't understand why, because if it is a long exposure then surely there would not be sufficient light to register any camera movement at the moment you manually operated the shutter release. Clearly there is something I am not getting. What is it?:thinking:
"Long exposure" usually refer to exposure times greater than the cameras max setting (usually 30 seconds). If you are attempting a 30 second exposure in M or A then you don't need a RSR. However if you want to shoot longer than 30 seconds (say 4 minutes as an example) you will need to be in Bulb mode and for this you will need the RSR to a) avoid the risk of camera movement and b) to stop you looking a bit of a ninny while you have your finger stuck to the release button for 4 minutes (which probably will induce camera movement).
 
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#15
If the shutter will lock open (sometimes referred to as T mode rather than B mode), you can also do long exposures with a hat rather than a remote shutter release.

But this tends to be more of a long exposure with film, rather than digital, thing.
 
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#16
No worries, I'd say I am one few members that uses triggers for probably 90% of my shooting if not more, as far as I'm concerned there are certainly times where a trigger isn't essential but life is always easier with one if your on a tripod...(y)
I agree with this 100%

I tried a few long exposures using the timer on the camera to trigger the shutter and whilst it did work I found it a bit restrictive. The best example I have is when I was shooting fireworks using a long exposure. The trigger just made the whole experience of shooting them a lot easier.
 

MWHCVT

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#17
I agree with this 100%

I tried a few long exposures using the timer on the camera to trigger the shutter and whilst it did work I found it a bit restrictive. The best example I have is when I was shooting fireworks using a long exposure. The trigger just made the whole experience of shooting them a lot easier.
To be honest fireworks without a trigger I wouldn't even bother, the whole key to fireworks is split second reaction to what is happening, you cannot have that with a 2 or 10 second delay, in that time the display speed or intensity has totally changed, it's for this same reason I also advocate if doing fireworks you need to be bulb mode so that you the photographer can decide precisely the exposure time based on the intensity of the fireworks
 
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#18
I hadn't thought about about bulb exposure, so I get that thank you. I can also see the point about bright lights, which I suppose could also include stars.
I always use a tripod and remote release anyway, I just wasnt sure if the remote was always necessary. Thnx
Just to add to this. On the 5DIII on long exposures I have no way to see the timer counting. The light goes out after a few seconds so using a remote with a lighted counter lets me see exactly how much time has elapsed without having to touch my camera to turn the light back on.
 
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#19
With the latest cameras a smart phone will do the job too.

Not that I have either.
 
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Rich
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#20
Mirror lock up also minimises any risk of vibration, no matter how small it can affect the result

With the latest cameras a smart phone will do the job too.

Not that I have either.
Me neither, good old cable remote release works for me, lot less to go wrong too
 
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#22
Mirror lock up also minimises any risk of vibration, no matter how small it can affect the result
Me neither, good old cable remote release works for me, lot less to go wrong too
I agree and often use both myself.
 
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#24
I always use a trigger/remote, either radio or wired for long exposures on a tripod. I also use the Mirror Lock Up option on my camera too. It is what it is designed for after all. ;)

I use the RF remote most of the time for shutter speeds under 30 seconds, and the wired remote for for exposures longer than 30 seconds using the Bulb setting, or for Timelapses. The wired remote I have is a copy of the Nikon MC-36 which is an intervalometer, for Timelapses, but also allows you to set shutter speeds for as long as you want, and so you don't have to stand there timing it yourself.

Not all tripods are equal, ;) and generally the heavier the design, the more useful in keeping the camera steady. When I have had to use the timer to take pics, I use the 10 second delay, as the camera can sometimes still be moving after a 2 second delay.

Remote controls of any type are not expensive at all, and are getting cheaper all the time. You can get a basic shutter with a lock for about £2. You can get a RF remote for about £5. (mine cost about £30 four years ago) I got a copy of the Nikon MC-26 for £15 about 3 years ago. The Nikon version is about £130. :eek:
 
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