Longer exposures - solution?

GfK

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#1
Hello.

Whilst on me hols last week, I wanted to take some pics of the sea crashing against the rocks (it got a bit rough yesterday!), using a slightly longer than normal exposure to exaggerate the movement of the sea. It was still quite sunny, and I found that I couldn't get an exposure any slower than 1/200th (when I wanted about 1/12th). Aperture was at f/9 and won't go any higher than that.

At 1/200th exposure, it wasn't the shot I wanted. Using a shutter speed any slower than that led to over-exposure.

Would it have helped slightly if my polariser had been on the camera, and not on my desk at home a thousand miles away? Any other tricks I can use to get longer exposures in difficult conditions?
 
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#2
A polariser would help but methinks you'll need an aperture of f/16 to f/22 to assist in getting an exposure of 1/2 sec or more. If you're after that wispy misty look for the sea, about 10secs or more is probably needed.
 

Steep

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#3
Neutral density filters are your solution, you can get them in various strengths, usually 2 and 4 stops. What they do is reduce the amount of light coming into the camera without affecting the colour so that you can use a slower shutter speed on bright days.
 
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#4
Steep said:
Neutral density filters are your solution, you can get them in various strengths, usually 2 and 4 stops. What they do is reduce the amount of light coming into the camera without affecting the colour so that you can use a slower shutter speed on bright days.
The man speaks the truth and offers the correct soloution ;) I use a 4 stop ND filter when I do this kind of photography and then combine that with ND graduated filters to stop the skys burning out and ruining the photos.
 
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As above really. What kind of camera where you using? In the past I've been known to use my sunglasses over the lens of a compact. I used to have some very expensive Calvin klein glasses that came with some very nice neutral gray clip on sunglasses attachments. They distorted the colour a little but produced some interesting effects in a pinch.
 
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#7
gandhi said:
In the past I've been known to use my sunglasses over the lens of a compact.
ive done the same! can work pretty well i thought, if little inconsistant :)
 

Marcel

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#8
noah said:
ive done the same! can work pretty well i thought, if little inconsistant :)
Now that's an interesting thought.

I have read of people using magnifying glasses, binoculars, telescopes, and now sunglasses.

It's good to see normal objects being used in this way, stuck over the front of the lens. Any other suggestions that can be used?
 
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GfK

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#9
gandhi said:
As above really. What kind of camera where you using?
Its a Fuji S5100.

Thx for the replies. ND filter seems to be what I need. :)
 
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#10
Marcel said:
Now that's an interesting thought.

I have read of people using magnifying glasses, binoculars, telescopes, and now sunglasses.

It's good to see normal objects being used in this way, stuck over the front of the lens. Any other suggestions that can be used?

Vaseline on a uv flter for a quick soft focus?

Nappy liners over the paper or the enlarger lens in a darkroom (never tried this with a camera though)

Just huffing on the lens can produce a nice soft focus effect. (as can suntan cream when you lend your camera to your 17yr old step-daughter for the day grrrrrrrrrr.)

Shooting through bottles, especially lucozade ones.

Rain covered windscreens.

all things I've used in the past in the desperate search for a creative angle!
 
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#11
gandhi said:
Vaseline on a uv flter for a quick soft focus?

Nappy liners over the paper or the enlarger lens in a darkroom (never tried this with a camera though)

Just huffing on the lens can produce a nice soft focus effect. (as can suntan cream when you lend your camera to your 17yr old step-daughter for the day grrrrrrrrrr.)

Shooting through bottles, especially lucozade ones.

Rain covered windscreens.

all things I've used in the past in the desperate search for a creative angle!
For a second there I thought I'd signed into one of the other forums by mistake ;)
 
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