Processing my own black and white film

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#1

RaglanSurf

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#3
No those would do it but that's an expensive way of buying film dev kit. I know you've got amazon vouchers but you'd be better off buying 2nd-hand kit from the well known action site. Maybe use your vouchers for the chemicals and film.
 

excalibur2

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#4
Just thought, i would probably need a film retriever for 35mm film.
Well a film retriever is always handy, although there are other DIY solutions...mine is a S\H Jessops bought off the bay for about £2-£3 and works well, maybe better ones but I'm happy.
 
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#6
Gave up with fannying about with film leader retrieval tools, I prize the top off with a bottle opener.
Brute force > fiddly faff.

:)
Ditto. Plus, of the few occasions I did pull the film back out the canister that way I scratched the film to all hell.
 
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#7
No those would do it but that's an expensive way of buying film dev kit. I know you've got amazon vouchers but you'd be better off buying 2nd-hand kit from the well known action site. Maybe use your vouchers for the chemicals and film.
Agree with Nick - you can do it for about £30 total if you buy a second-hand tank and a changing bag and £3 thermometer from eBay and jugs from Poundstretchers. You don't really need the squeegee, and although the film clips are nice to have, you can make do with other clips. I think I'd spend the Amazon vouchers on the chemicals too. Having said that, if you value the convenience over saving a few quid, then the kit looks fine. You can do what John says and use a bottle opener inside the bag to remove the film. Having said that, I just bought a film retriever, because threading the film onto the spiral outside the bag is a lot easier than doing it blind, in my experience.
 
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#14
I may have read it wrong but I never use a retriever when I develop in my dark bag, I just pop the ends off the canister with a bottle opener and cut off the narrow tag end and feed the film on to the spool of my Patterson tank. It's best to start with a squared up end any way. After you roll the film on to the spool cut off the spindle. If you use a Patterson tank practice with a wasted roll until you get the hang of it. Its all done by feel in the dark bag and takes a bit to get used to. I develop once a week usually. Hope I helped if you have questions I am not a professional but I will answer and try to help or send you a list of what I use if you like.
 

RaglanSurf

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#15
I may have read it wrong but I never use a retriever when I develop in my dark bag, I just pop the ends off the canister with a bottle opener and cut off the narrow tag end and feed the film on to the spool of my Patterson tank. It's best to start with a squared up end any way. After you roll the film on to the spool cut off the spindle. If you use a Patterson tank practice with a wasted roll until you get the hang of it. Its all done by feel in the dark bag and takes a bit to get used to. I develop once a week usually. Hope I helped if you have questions I am not a professional but I will answer and try to help or send you a list of what I use if you like.
I've used both methods, most of the time I'll do as you do and pop the canister open in the dark bag but the benefit of using the film retriever method is that you can trim the end of the film and get it started into the reel before you put it in the changing bag or turn the light off in the darkroom. Either work, horses for courses and all that.
 
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#16
Just thought, i would probably need a film retriever for 35mm film.
You are not obliged to rewind the film entirely into the cassette. I always leave the film leader hanging out of the cassette and start the film into the developing spiral in the light. Then the film + spiral go into the changing bag.
 
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ChrisR

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#17
You are not obliged to rewind the film entirely into the cassette. I always leave the film leader hanging out of the cassette and start the film into the developing spiral in the light. Then the film + spiral go into the changing bag.
This is what I do; I use a Rondinax daylight tank, no changing bag required, but I do have to have the leader out. Trim the leader, clip it to the strap, feed the end into the little chute, pop the cassette into the slot, lid on, then wind until it stops, operate the shears to cut the film, then finish winding and chuck the chems in. Voila!

The disadvantage of leaving the leader out is that it is possible to confuse a used film for an unused one, particularly if you put them back in the plastic pots... I wind nearly all the film in, leaving only half an inch or so out, to make clear it's a used one.
 
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#18
This is what I do; I use a Rondinax daylight tank, no changing bag required, but I do have to have the leader out. Trim the leader, clip it to the strap, feed the end into the little chute, pop the cassette into the slot, lid on, then wind until it stops, operate the shears to cut the film, then finish winding and chuck the chems in. Voila!

The disadvantage of leaving the leader out is that it is possible to confuse a used film for an unused one, particularly if you put them back in the plastic pots... I wind nearly all the film in, leaving only half an inch or so out, to make clear it's a used one.
To avoid confusion with unexposed film, I make sure the tip of the leader is visibly kinked - most of my cameras do this kinking themselves but I make sure by hand if necessary.
 

ChrisR

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#19
To avoid confusion with unexposed film, I make sure the tip of the leader is visibly kinked - most of my cameras do this kinking themselves but I make sure by hand if necessary.
I tried that once, but leaving it in the plastic pot de-kinked it, and I shot it again! Really annoying specially so since I was unsure and discussed it on here and folk said to dev the film anyway. Then I convinced myself it was unexposed, and double-exposed the lot. Nothing interesting emerged either, frames all out of alignment, I didn't even bother scanning more than the first frame... :(
 
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#20
Just write on the film tub in permanent marker "EXPOSED". I also keep all my exposed film in a bag sealed with a clip in the fridge. Worked for me over the last 20 years.
 

Asha

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#21
but leaving it in the plastic pot de-kinked it, and I shot it again!
Tbh if you put a very distinct fold or even two in the film leader then this method is practically foolproof and the fold over of the film means that the leader doesn't dissapear into the canister .....Can't say that I've experienced any problems with ths method.
 

excalibur2

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#22
You are not obliged to rewind the film entirely into the cassette. I always leave the film leader hanging out of the cassette and start the film into the developing spiral in the light. Then the film + spiral go into the changing bag.
Many of the latest cameras don't have a rewind knob, very annoying as I like to give all my caneras a workout with different lenses and a 36 exp film could be used in three cameras so a film retriever is needed.
 
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#23
Many of the latest cameras don't have a rewind knob, very annoying as I like to give all my caneras a workout with different lenses and a 36 exp film could be used in three cameras so a film retriever is needed.
I have yet to use every model of film camera (but give me time) but my modern film cameras, while rewinding completely by default, have an option to leave the leader out. With Canon EOS cameras it is a custom function setting.
 

TheBigYin

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#24
I have yet to use every model of film camera (but give me time) but my modern film cameras, while rewinding completely by default, have an option to leave the leader out. With Canon EOS cameras it is a custom function setting.
Yep, EOS-3 for example, its custom function 2, 0=leader rewound, 1=leader out. But I'm guessing, from knowing Brian's idea of "modern", he's not talking about cameras of that nature - more like canon T70/T90's ;)
 

excalibur2

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#25
Yep, EOS-3 for example, its custom function 2, 0=leader rewound, 1=leader out. But I'm guessing, from knowing Brian's idea of "modern", he's not talking about cameras of that nature - more like canon T70/T90's ;)
...and my Nikon f90x, also my EOS 300...but you said a few years ago the T90 can be set by a mod (good pun) for the leader to be left out but IIRC wasn't simple so haven't bothered.
 

excalibur2

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#27
Thanks but :eek::eek::eek: I'll stick with the film retriever...also on the link was a VG review of the T70, absolute bargain for the prices he was saying $10-$20 inc a 50mm lens
 

Asha

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#28
With à bit of practice, the auto film rewind function on cameras can be halted by opening the battery cover as soon as the distinct sound is heard of the film parting the take up spool.
 

excalibur2

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#29
With à bit of practice, the auto film rewind function on cameras can be halted by opening the battery cover as soon as the distinct sound is heard of the film parting the take up spool.
Good tip if using these cameras all the time and can time in right with practice.
 
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