Share Your Inspirational Videos?

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#1
I'm putting this in F&C because most of the videos I watch and get inspired by are film photographers (or photographers who shot on film)

Tonight, I stumbled across this gem which is an interview with Ray Barbee. I have no clue who he is, but once the intro is done (takes a while to get going), I found his talk on printing, and also on Digital vs Film to be very absorbing. I too identify with much of the content here.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8axbOTR0d7Q


To copy out the quote (which is available on Constantine Manos' site)

The Print
There are photographers who still believe that a photograph does not exist until it is a print. There remains in their memory the experience of working in a darkroom and recalling the magic of seeing an image gradually appear on a piece of paper in a tray of liquid, all this bathed in a warm golden light.

If processed and stored properly this print can last for generations. It becomes archival; it becomes vintage. It becomes a treasure to be put in a fine box between soft acid-free tissues. It can be framed and hung in a favorite spot, to become an object of daily pleasure and comfort. It is a real object we can hold in our hands, not a negative or an image floating around in space and stored in cold machines.

Whether captured on film or captured digitally, this print, this object, reflects the craft and skill and pride of its maker. Its quality is a reflection of the skill and art of its making.
Let us sign it with our name as an expression of pride and accomplishment – whether we have made it ourselves or have entrusted its making to a skilled artisan. Let us be collectors and guardians of these beautiful artifacts.

Let us celebrate the print.

(Source)

So do you have any interesting or thought provoking videos to share?
 
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#4
I don't think I can post my 'inspirational' videos !

:facepalm::facepalm: :exit:

More seriously - I struggle with the 'art' side of photography which is my own failing and not aimed at others but I enjoy anything by Gavin Hoey.
 
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sirch

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#7
At risk of derailing a perfectly good thread...

I struggle with the 'art' side of photography which is my own failing
It's not a failing at all though. To use an analogy it's like the sort of couture fashion that appears on the cat-walks, most people manage to get dressed perfectly well without knowing "this season's tends" and don’t really know or care that the jumper they just bought in M&S was influenced by a designer show 6 months ago.

In fact, judging by the views so often expressed in the few "debates" about art-photography that have gone on on here, it's probably a distinct advantage :)
 
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#9
At risk of derailing a perfectly good thread...



It's not a failing at all though. To use an analogy it's like the sort of couture fashion that appears on the cat-walks, most people manage to get dressed perfectly well without knowing "this season's tends" and don’t really know or care that the jumper they just bought in M&S was influenced by a designer show 6 months ago.

In fact, judging by the views so often expressed in the few "debates" about art-photography that have gone on on here, it's probably a distinct advantage :)
What a lovely reply Chris..........but you are being far to kind in my case!

Just recently I asked myself the two following question (as a result of GAS)

(1) Do I love photography - no not really; I don't miss not being able to take pictures that much.
(2) Do I love cameras - absolutely! They really make me 'buzz'.

When I was at school I was a kind of Enigma! back in the days when we did 'O' levels and 'A' levels I got straight 'A's' in Maths, Further Maths, Physics. Chemistry, Biology and Economics at O level and three straight 'A's in Maths, further Maths & Physics at A level, however I really struggled to get a University placement because every other subject including English language I got straight fails at; not even a grading! (Much to my mothers despair as she was an English teacher.)

The school thought this was very Odd as did my parents so I went for some tests and it was found I suffered with Shape/pattern dyslexia - still not sure what that fully means?

So, I absolutely love the technology of cameras and the engineering of them; it absolutely fascinates me and 'feeling quality' and design brings a huge smile to my face. Further to this the way they record light falling on something either on Film or a sensor is brilliant.

I understand composition because it is mathematical (rule of 1/3rds), lighting ratios (again mathematical)and the 'technical side' etc but a picture conveying thoughts I just can't do! (In my english exam when I was told to write an essay I left the page blank so actually putting a 'story from words into a picture is pretty much a 'no go' for me!).

So, I am extremely tolerant of those who love Photography for the 'Art' - I wish I could see it and I am quite jealous; I have tried but my 'thicko' brain just can't compute :-(
 
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Harlequin565
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#10
I understand composition because it is mathematical
Edward Weston said that "To consult the rules of composition before making a picture is a little like consulting the law of gravity before going for a walk. Such rules and laws are deduced from the accomplished fact; they are the products of reflection." I love this quote.

[myopinion] I used to think that there was some mythical "thing" I needed to understand to be "more arty", but there isn't. It's about knowing why you want to take that picture, and going about it in such a way that makes it interesting. Interesting most importantly to you, and as an added bonus - to others. Then when those "others" discuss your image they'll deduce various things about it that they like - which they may then go on to emulate in their work. [/myopinion]

Understanding art, and looking at the works of other (accomplished) photographers helps educate you as to how they went about photographing their subjects in a way that was interesting.
 
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#11
Edward Weston said that "To consult the rules of composition before making a picture is a little like consulting the law of gravity before going for a walk. Such rules and laws are deduced from the accomplished fact; they are the products of reflection." I love this quote.

[myopinion] I used to think that there was some mythical "thing" I needed to understand to be "more arty", but there isn't. It's about knowing why you want to take that picture, and going about it in such a way that makes it interesting. Interesting most importantly to you, and as an added bonus - to others. Then when those "others" discuss your image they'll deduce various things about it that they like - which they may then go on to emulate in their work. [/myopinion]

Understanding art, and looking at the works of other (accomplished) photographers helps educate you as to how they went about photographing their subjects in a way that was interesting.
Ian I appreciate what you are saying, I really do.

But in respect to Edward Weston my brain says - WTF

and the other part of the post I genuinely don't understand. I would like to hit the 'like button' for the effort you have made in posting it but I honestly don't understand it at all.

It is in no way being rude to you but I could not even try to educate myself, I really couldn't; my brain just 'works differently' it is my fault and not anybody elses and I understand that.

It isn't even a different language and the only way I can tell people how much I really can't understand it is it would be exactly the same as me trying to teach my old Labrador arithmetic. (we communicate completely differently)

I really,really don't want anyone to be offended by this but my brain just works completely differently - If I look at a photograph I either like it or not; there is no point me staring at it trying to work out a meaning because I don't even get thoughts like that, I have tried but my mind is blank; just like when I was asked to write an essay.

It's so hard to convey to others that don't have the 'problem' I do.
 
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sirch

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#12
Gotta love the Film and conventional section, we can have sensible. considered and frankly intelligent conversations.

Edward Weston said that "To consult the rules of composition before making a picture is a little like consulting the law of gravity before going for a walk. Such rules and laws are deduced from the accomplished fact; they are the products of reflection."
I've not seen that quote before but it has just become one of my favourite photography quotes.
 

Andysnap

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#13
It isn't even a different language and the only way I can tell people how much I really can't understand it myself is it would be exactly the same as me trying to teach my old Labrador arithmetic. (we communicate completely differently)
Fully understand this. I'm colour blind and there is no way I can train my brain or my eyes to not be colour blind, so when I take a shot in colour I then edit it to look how my eyes/brain think it should look, this offends some people who shout "colour cast" at me :eek::D
 
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Harlequin565
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#14
If I look at a photograph I either like it or not; there is no point me staring at it trying to work out a meaning because I don't even get thoughts like that, I have tried but my mind is blank; just like when I was asked to write an essay.
The question is:- Is that something that bothers you?
 

simon ess

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Ian I appreciate what you are saying, I really do.

But in respect to Edward Weston my brain says - WTF

and the other part of the post I genuinely don't understand. I would like to hit the 'like button' for the effort you have made in posting it but I honestly don't understand it at all.

It is in no way being rude to you but I could not even try to educate myself, I really couldn't; my brain just 'works differently' it is my fault and not anybody elses and I understand that.

It isn't even a different language and the only way I can tell people how much I really can't understand it is it would be exactly the same as me trying to teach my old Labrador arithmetic. (we communicate completely differently)

I really,really don't want anyone to be offended by this but my brain just works completely differently - If I look at a photograph I either like it or not; there is no point me staring at it trying to work out a meaning because I don't even get thoughts like that, I have tried but my mind is blank; just like when I was asked to write an essay.

It's so hard to convey to others that don't have the 'problem' I do.
And yet you have written this.
 
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#16
And yet you have written this.
Thanks Simon - you will find that I constantly 'hit the edit button' (to much annoyance of others) when I first post as it is 'littered' with errors and It takes me ages to try to get posts to make sense or what I feel is what I want to say.

@Harlequin565; yes Ian it does bother me - I would love to be able to have a 'talent' in art hence why I have spent some considerable time trying to teach myself but I get properly frustrated (& depressed), so much so I quite often think about packing it all in because it 'hits' your self confidence.
 
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#17
So for @Fraser Euan White - and apologies to those non-Ted Forbes fans,

View: https://youtu.be/rA0FY9H3lCI


tl;dr : "(1) Do I love photography - no not really; I don't miss not being able to take pictures that much." This was your most worrying statement. Suggest Finding Some Inspiration. You speak passionately about the technology - so the passion is there. You have feelings about the images you look at (even if you can't connect feelings to reasons). Perhaps it's not as impossible as reversing colour blindness. Just a thought.
 
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#18
So for @Fraser Euan White - and apologies to those non-Ted Forbes fans,

View: https://youtu.be/rA0FY9H3lCI


tl;dr : "(1) Do I love photography - no not really; I don't miss not being able to take pictures that much." This was your most worrying statement. Suggest Finding Some Inspiration. You speak passionately about the technology - so the passion is there. You have feelings about the images you look at (even if you can't connect feelings to reasons). Perhaps it's not as impossible as reversing colour blindness. Just a thought.
Hi Ian, not getting out to take photographs really doesn't worry me at all but not even starting to 'see' in images what others clearly do does frustrate me, it's something I wish I could understand but I just can't :-( (P.S. I quite like Ted Forbes but prefer his Camera Reviews/tech help blogs)

A quick example of how my daft brain works:

I can look at this Photograph for hours; I love looking at the parts, the intricate machining, working out how it fits together and the engineering solutions made. It's also in focus and well lit:



Then this Photograph below which was the subject of a discussion recently:



I can look at for a maximum of a minute - it does nothing for me and I wouldn't even say it was a good photograph. (I have no problems whatsoever with people saying otherwise.)

I look at a photograph (I never really study it unless I am trying to work out how it was lit) and say I really like that or no I don't instantly. They never provoke any thoughts though no matter how hard I try :-( I know it is ME so please don't be offended by it - I have no problem with people loving and enjoying Art; they are lucky people :)

Thanks again,

Fras. (Maybe one day in Marbury we might meet and you will see what an odd ball I am!)
 

Andysnap

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#20
"and you will see what an odd ball I am"

Ha ha, you haven't met Ian and I yet, or Simon or Mr Badger etc....in this little haven of calm we are all odd, at least a little bit :banana:
 
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#21
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#22
I'm not entirely sure how inspirational this one is, but it's a gentle way to pass 10 minutes on Elliott Erwitt's book for The MacAllan, mainly shot on Tri X in his Leica. It won't embed as media, so here's the link. http://www.magnumphotos-commercial....at-scottish-adventure#!prettyPhoto[pp_gal]/1/

And for the benefit of the Onich crew, Alexander McCall Smith's words from the book: ;)
"In these photographs, one can sense the imminent onset of rain, never far away in Scotland"
 
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#24
Some good videos being shared here. I have a couple of film/analogue based videos I watch from time to time for inspiration. By a couple, I mean lots but here are a few to begin with which I like...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjtphPVchJI


View: https://vimeo.com/39578584


All of Ian Ruhter's videos are really good actually, particularly the one where he is with Gary Oldman in the desert shooting massive plates.

So, I absolutely love the technology of cameras and the engineering of them; it absolutely fascinates me and 'feeling quality' and design brings a huge smile to my face. Further to this the way they record light falling on something either on Film or a sensor is brilliant.

I understand composition because it is mathematical (rule of 1/3rds), lighting ratios (again mathematical)and the 'technical side' etc but a picture conveying thoughts I just can't do! (
The engineering and design of film cameras is beautiful and that's why I have a few. They are all slightly different and lovely objects. My Leica is from 1958 and I love the fact that it takes amazing images now. As for the composition and lighting ratios being a mathematical exercise, whilst it has been found that things like the "rule of thirds" (man, I hate using that term, especially the word 'rule') and the golden ration lead to more visually pleasing images in a lot of cases, if we stick rigidly to these rules when creating imagery, things become stale very quickly indeed. I could in fact talk for hours on the subject but I leave those lengthy posts to Teflon Mike. Ha.

When I first got into photography, the technical aspects came very quickly to me when some people struggle to get their head around them. The exposure triangle, rule of thirds, etc. I made images that followed these whilst also maintaining 'correct' exposure and following advice from people on forums and critique based on a set of b******t rules that we are taught to follow for no other reason that it's the right way to do things. I hated photography. My images left me cold and I just loathed them. Whilst technically 'correct', they were lifeless, emotionless and numb. Now I am not saying that the people who produce beautiful imagery that I admire don't shoot in this way, however I bet the majority of them don't consult these rules during a shoot, they just do it instinctively.

The Edward Weston quote is one of my favourites, one which I saw often to people, and obviously I don't know for sure how he meant that to be interpreted, but I imagine it was along the lines of composition being instinctual and focusing on capturing the moment, being in the moment and creating images with emotion and feeling over trying to create a checklist of camera judge/forumesque "rules" that need to be adhered to for an image to be right.

*No blown whites
*Subject on a third
*No blacks blocked up
*18% grey exposure
*Eyes have to be in focus/subject looking at the camera

That's a sure fire way to create some pretty mundane looking photography.

I believe there was once a study done where they gave cameras to children and told them to go take photos. Their photos, whilst perhaps wonky, too bright, too dark, bits cut off, etc were really interesting. Then they taught them the 'rules' of photography to follow and told them to shoot again. Their images came back technically correct but much less interesting.
 
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#26
Irving Penn on location in Morocco:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWRcaz-fpjk


Isabel Munoz (does shoot digi but there's some really cool Pt/Pd printing and a bit of film too):
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPdYMqIpXag


Platon's episode on the Netflix series Abstract (episode 7) is really interesting, shoots portraits with a Hasselblad V series and evironmental portraits with 2x Leica M6s, but the way he interacts with sitters is the most interesting bit IMO:
https://www.netflix.com/gb/title/80057883
 

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#27
I haven't got a link to this as it was on Sky Arts but I have just watched a very interesting programme on Yousuf Karsh, it was called Karsh is History.

I've always found his portraits to be wonderfully lit and to show more than just a representation of the sitter and it was interesting to see how he achieved this effect and to here more of his own life story.

Have a look at his shot of Churchill, stunning.
 
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#28
Thanks for the reminder Andy, I've had his Retrospective book on my wish list for a while now and this prompted me to check Amazon prices. A tenner!! I always thought his portraits were fab too.
 

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#29
I'm not entirely sure how inspirational this one is, but it's a gentle way to pass 10 minutes on Elliott Erwitt's book for The MacAllan, mainly shot on Tri X in his Leica. It won't embed as media, so here's the link. http://www.magnumphotos-commercial....at-scottish-adventure#!prettyPhoto[pp_gal]/1/

And for the benefit of the Onich crew, Alexander McCall Smith's words from the book: ;)
"In these photographs, one can sense the imminent onset of rain, never far away in Scotland"
Photography and scotch, doesn't get more inspirational than that (y) Besides it's really good to get an insight into the thinking of a great photographer.
 
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#31
I also really enjoy the Joe Brady videos on You Tube which are mainly instructional but he explains things very well for simpletons like me.
 
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#32
I'm putting this in F&C because most of the videos I watch and get inspired by are film photographers (or photographers who shot on film)

Tonight, I stumbled across this gem which is an interview with Ray Barbee. I have no clue who he is, but once the intro is done (takes a while to get going), I found his talk on printing, and also on Digital vs Film to be very absorbing. I too identify with much of the content here.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8axbOTR0d7Q


To copy out the quote (which is available on Constantine Manos' site)

The Print
There are photographers who still believe that a photograph does not exist until it is a print. There remains in their memory the experience of working in a darkroom and recalling the magic of seeing an image gradually appear on a piece of paper in a tray of liquid, all this bathed in a warm golden light.

If processed and stored properly this print can last for generations. It becomes archival; it becomes vintage. It becomes a treasure to be put in a fine box between soft acid-free tissues. It can be framed and hung in a favorite spot, to become an object of daily pleasure and comfort. It is a real object we can hold in our hands, not a negative or an image floating around in space and stored in cold machines.

Whether captured on film or captured digitally, this print, this object, reflects the craft and skill and pride of its maker. Its quality is a reflection of the skill and art of its making.
Let us sign it with our name as an expression of pride and accomplishment – whether we have made it ourselves or have entrusted its making to a skilled artisan. Let us be collectors and guardians of these beautiful artifacts.

Let us celebrate the print.

(Source)

So do you have any interesting or thought provoking videos to share?

I ordered my first print from a film camera today following this post Ian. (y)
 
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#34
In my attempt to try and improve my photography I attended my very first photographic society meet last night where they had brought in an external judge to judge their monthly competition.

The judge was excellent offering good feedback on each entry and the standard was very good.

I really enjoyed the evening and found it very useful.
 
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#35
I tend to avoid the 'photographic society' scene these days, as from personal experience I've ended up thinking that I've somehow accidentally strayed into an audition for supporting characters for an episode of Midsomer Murders! I'll tell you a funny story about my last encounter if you remind me next time we meet.
 
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#37
This, which @Ed Sutton posted on another thread. I am very impressed by what I have seen of Nadav Kander's work and I am not easily impressed...
I had my portrait taken by him for one of his projects a few years back and hung around for some other sittings and I was really inspired by the way he works. His work outside of portraiture is really stunning too, I find myself going over his Yangtze series on a semi-regular basis.
 
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