1. cj4now

    cj4now

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    I was out all day getting some practice, and attempting to start a simple, themed project I have in mind at the same time (might as well try and pull something together, even if I am only learning for now).

    After a while I was pressing the shutter to take a pic but nothing happened. A message appeared on screen and in the viewfinder R10, I had a wee look into that and I figured that's the camera letting me know how many pics I can fire off before it can't load anymore. My assumption is the two are not connected. Would I be correct to think that?
    I spent some time deleting older pics from my memory card, I had just shy of 300 pics on it (apx 150 fine-jpegs plus 150 RAW-Fine, I suppose that's 450 in total really), eventually the shutter started working again and I could snap away quite happily. My memory card was thrown in as a bonus when I bought my camera, so I'm assuming it's ok but not brilliant; it's a 'hama 16GB, R45mb sec' and it has HC 1 stamped on it as well. As far as memory cards go, I haven't a clue, but I have an inkling that as it is digital information there must be some sort of transfer time between camera and card. Not sure though.


    My questions are;

    1) Is the R10 message and the shutter apparently not working related?
    2) Was it simply a case of my memory card not being up to the job? Therefore the camera will not let me take anymore till the card catches up.
    3) Does it sound like a known problem with the camera (shutter count is only around 1100), Nikon D5100.
    4) How can I fix it so it doesn't happen again, or at the very least be able to know how to solve it if it does?

    I was shooting in manual if that helps. Also, I haven't dropped it or anything either.

    As ever, thanks in advance for any advice folks, it's really appreciated.
     
  2. rob-nikon

    rob-nikon

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    The r10 code means how many images can fit into the buffer before its full.

    https://www.richardpeters.co.uk/nikon-dslr-error-codes-what-do-they-mean/

    What modes are you shooting? There could be many reasons for this, unlikely to a camera fault if you aren’t seeing the err code. It’s most likely to be a camera setting or the way you were shooting.

    Just a few questions:

    Were you taking continuous images?
    Had you held the shutter down without releasing or going back to half press?
    What release mode were you using (single or continuous)?- page 28 of manual.
    What focus mode (AF-S or AF-C)?- page 33 of manual.
    Was focus acquired (round dot in the viewfinder?

    I was using this D5100 manual for the above.
    https://cdn-10.nikon-cdn.com/pdf/manuals/dslr/D5100_EN.pdf

    Not sure what the write speed will be on the Hama memory card but the stated 45mb/s will be the read speed. The write speed is what’s important and most likely a lot lower on that memory card. I wouldn’t think it’s a card writing issue if the camera was showing R10 (ie still room for 10 images in the buffer).
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  3. JohnX

    JohnX

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    Your point 2 is correct. You need a faster memory card.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  4. Nawty

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    https://www.richardpeters.co.uk/nikon-dslr-error-codes-what-do-they-mean/

    Worth reading your manual too.

    But essentially it’s not an error and is how many shots are left in the buffer, in this instance caused by the camera being busy deleting images from the card. A faster memory card will help it clear more quickly but if it isn’t happening in normal use then it is perfectly fine.
     
  5. rob-nikon

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    If the card isn’t writing faster enough wouldn’t the images that can’t write to the card fill up buffer until it showed r0 rather than r10? It could be something as simple as the release mode being set to single and needing the shutter releasing before the camera takes another frame. Probably need some more info before being able to solve this one.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  6. cj4now

    cj4now

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    Appreciate the response folks.

    I didn't have my manual with me today (lesson learned there).

    @rob-nikon
    I was only shooting single images, but once or twice I'd maybe take 2 or 3 (no more) one after the other.
    Can't remember if I kept shutter depressed, I don't think I did though. More likely I would press it in a few times after it not 'shutting' thinking it was just slow, that's the sort of thing I would do. The half press focusing and releasing thing is something I had been practising.
    I had half pressed to use automatic focus, I don't think it focused, it definitely never went to the little dot.
    Release mode is on single frame.
    Focus mode is AF-A


    @Nawty I'm working my way through the manual and also a Nikon beginners manual but I am a complete novice, so it's baby steps at the moment.....A lot of information to take in lol.... Hopefully I'll pick it up quicker when I start my night class. I started deleting files after it appeared to jam.

    @JohnK A back up memory card is actually something I need to get, probably get a faster one and use the one I have for back up. I'll maybe start a new thread for advice on that, so as not to clutter this one.


    I hope this additional info helps, and again, I really do appreciate the advice. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  7. rob-nikon

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    If you are using single frame release mode the camera will only take one image per shutter depression. To take another image it would need the shutter releasing and then depressed again. I'm currently thinking its sometimes not achieving focus and locking out until it achieves focus (half pressing the shutter). Was the light you were in poor and lacking contrast? Auto focus often struggles in poor/dark light.

    Regarding the little focus indicator dot its explained on page 19 of the manual. Looks like it's a little different to the Nikon cameras I've used (I've not used a D3xxx or D5xxx series camera).

    The r number buffer is explained on page 29. If the buffer was dropping to r0 I could see it being memory card write speed issue (this video is a D750 but shows the buffer reaching r0 and holding off taking a shot until the buffer shows r1 again):
    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyrZ0rj2BNk


    Regarding memory cards I've used these for several years:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/SanDisk-Extreme-SDHC-Memory-Class/dp/B01J5RHBQ4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1533592194&sr=8-2&keywords=sandisk+sd+95mb/s+card

    For the price they are now they are worth the extra cost and perfect if you ever upgrade to say a D7xxx model in the future.

    These would probably be ok performance wise in a D5100:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/SanDisk-Ul...f_rd_t=40701&refRID=MCR9J9ZECJZTS8KSQBYZ&th=1

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/SanDisk-Ul...f_rd_t=40701&refRID=MCR9J9ZECJZTS8KSQBYZ&th=1
     

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    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  8. cj4now

    cj4now

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    @rob-nikon Even though I was indoors (museum) the light wasn't great in places, quite frustrating at times to be honest. Contrast may have been an issue as the installation I was focusing on was numerous heads suspended from the ceiling. I'd assume picking out one to focus on might have been a problem for the camera.

    The thing about it locking out on AF; would it still 'jam' even though I attempted to override the AF by focusing manually at one point? It didn't just jam for a second or two, it stayed that way for a good few minutes.

    Cheers for the info on memory cards, I'll have a wee look at them. :)
     
  9. SteveSc

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    I think this is probably where the problem is, from memory in some modes my Nikon won't let the shutter fire unless the camera has achieved focus. I think with AF-S it needs focus, with AF-C it doesn't and AF-A is an auto mode that chooses one of the S or C modes depending which it thinks is best at the time. I'm not sure if switching to manual focus would override this choice or not.
     
  10. rob-nikon

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    On the Nikon models I’ve used (D7xxx series upwards) there is a custom setting where you can define how the camera prioritises focus (focus or release) in AF-S and AF-C. I’m not what setting the D5100 uses as their does seem to be a custom setting for this. I think you are right in what you are saying that AF-S needs to achieve focus before releasing.

    Sounds like the light wasn’t great which could make focusing difficult and potentially lock out. Manual intervention can also be dependant on the lens too. Some of my lenses don’t disengage AF until the manual focus ring is turned quite a bit and a half press engages focus again.

    When you say it’s locking out for several mintues are you trying it in good light at that point or the same subject and light conditions? Also what lens are you using? Does the same problem occur with other lenses too?
     
    SteveSc likes this.
  11. Teflon-Mike

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    Should I assume that you are using NEF + JPG setting?

    That gives the processor double the work to do, and double the buffer space to handle duel file format.
    Use one of the other.

    Personally, I dont see too much benefit to NEF, you have to post-process the files to display or share anyway, so adds faff to the job, and unless there's good reason JPG isn't going to do a good enough job on its own, I see little benefit.

    Beyond that; SLOW DOWN to GO FAST... or more haste less speed.. Dont rush to hurry!

    Take your time; remember to breath; remember how to hold the camera for best stability and squeeze not snatch; pay attension to what you are pointing camera at... North-south, East West, check the corners then the rest.... say it BEFORE you pess the shutter; MAKE yourself take that bit of time to be sure you know ALL of what's in the viewfinder before you commit it to silicon chip; give the camera a chance to find focus, find settings and lock them; give yourself a chance to get the camera steady, give yourself a chance to be sure you are getting what you want.

    Gives the camera an easier time; gives you an easier time, and you should get more better photo's from the small discipline... and NOT be so dependent on the hardware making up the short fall, and being convinced you MUST have a faster focus or a faster SD card....

    On that particular topic, I have to say that fast SD cards are worth it, and you do have to read the spec carefully; a lot of the cheaper ones are noteably slow, or they quote a fast read speed to hide a slow write speed, and or they quote an 'average' transfer speed, made from a usually much faster read than write.... smaller SD cards can also be practically 'faster' than similar speed larger ones.... And I will say, that it was one of the things I got 'sorted' pretty early on when I got the 24Mpic D3200, that makes very large file sizes compared to earlier digital cameras... But even so.... you have to be really pushing the electrickery to make the camera buffer over-run.... I use 16Gb 45Mb/S cards.. and 'can' get them to buffer lock if I really try..... but I REALLY have to try... and shooting NEF+Jpeg will do it..... but... slow down take it shot by shot, and it 'shouldn't lock up, or focus hunt or demand a re-meter, and you will get more speed from less haste, and not lock up so easily; I have used the O/H's super-slow super cheapie 32Gb cards before now, when needed, and just taking your time, giving the camera time, a fast card ISN'T an absolute essential.... useful, yes, essential no! As so much else.

    And that I suspect is the bigger issue here, just 'rushing'.
     
  12. cj4now

    cj4now

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    Mike, I was taking my time trying to get things right. At the moment I'm focusing on learning to balance out my exposure when prioritising either shutter speed or aperture, so everything is a tad slow at the moment. Put it this way, if I went out to take a photo of a sunset by the time I'm good to go I'd have to turn around and capture a sunrise instead! lol I'm going to adjust the file setting to RAW only though. I want to get into the habit of working with RAW files early as I've read it's the best way to go if you want to post process.

    Steve, I'll have a look at the focus settings and read up a little on them as well. I know I've still got a lot to learn about my camera, but I'm working through it a little piece at a time. :)

    @rob-nikon I tried a few times at the same spot then I tried it at the other side of the gallery. That's not to say the light was any better where I moved to though, probably much the same to be fair. The lens is a Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 55-200 f4-5.6 G ED. I only have one other lens (18-55mm f3.5-5.6). I changed it over when I moved and it was still jammed, then changed it straight back to the 55-200 straight after and it started working again. All this took place over, say 5-10mins.
     
  13. SteveSc

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    Having looked again at your initial post, this may be a silly question but was the memory card just full so not allowing you to take any more pictures? Just that you mention having 150 jpegs and 150 RAWs on only a 16gb card. Also you seem to say the problem went after you deleted some (if I read it right)

    I only have an old Nikon so not sure what the newer ones do but on mine, where the R10 was coming up, when the shutter button is not being pressed it shows how many more shots the card can hold. If it's the same for you do you remember what the number was when you were having problems?
     
  14. GreenNinja67

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    Also you've said you were deleting files on the camera, not formatting.

    Give the card a format in the camera, this wipes the slate clean as it were and allows the camera to write to the card at the card's highest speed.

    Just deleting certain files on the card can slow it down.
     
  15. Teflon-Mike

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    24Mpix NEFs seem to average about 20-25Mb a piece. Corresponding Jpg, around 10-15Mb. So NEF+JPG, would suggest around 35Mb a shot, and a 16Gb card 'aught' take aprox 4-500 photo's, 1000 image files before full.... 'ish'.

    So the card shouldn't have been full... but if there was anything else on it, and video is particularly card-space hungry, its not out of the question.

    That doesn't actually deny the suggestion you may still be rushing.... you are, it seems, trying to get to grips with a heck of a lot of 'faff', and loading up your plate with an enormous amount of 'stuff' to consider... which all takes a lot of consideration, and time... does NOT mean that you aren't 'rushing'.... skipping over or trying to do fast the bits you 'think' are simple, because of how much else you have heaped the plate with that seems 'complicated'..... So, when it comes to the shutter-moment... all else faffed with... it's still likely you 'rush' at least that bit of the job....

    Shoving the pigeon in-front of the bus full of cats here... but WHY? NEF/RAW, doesn't make it 'easier' or 'better' to post process. Just heaps that plate some more!

    'RAW' file format, actually isn't all that 'raw' as in the unprocessed data taken from the camera sensor. Even if it was; all that data is, would be the individual receptor values for the 'brightness' of light falling on them; without any electric amplification to adjust the overall 'brightness' of the image or effective ISO of the sensor. And THAT is essentially all you can effect 'change' in post-process.

    You cannot adjust the shutter speed, you cannot adjust the aperture setting, you cannot adjust the focus range; you cannot change the lens you use, you cannot alter anything much beyond the amount of ISO amplification to the sensor signal.

    Beyond that, there is only limited scope to alter the way the computer interprets the sensor data; worth noting that a 24Mpix camera doesn't have a corresponding number of sensor receptors; it needs three bits of data for each pixel, one for Red, one for Green, one for Blue; to get these the sensor is 'pre-filtered' with individual receptors receiving a signal for one color channel. To get a data-set for one pixel, then, the computer needs to 'poll' three sensors; one red one, one green one, one blue one.... and as these aren't in the same place.... what it will actually do is poll perhaps a dozen 'close' receptors, and 'interpolate' their values to make each 'virtual' image pixel by a 'best guess' of what the sensor receptors deliver in that area of the image. So starts the 'processing'.. the automatic 'best guessing'

    Jpg.... is an off the shelf 'standard' processing algorithm; it looks at the receptor values and interpolates values from an array of adjacent ones to make a best guess at what it should choose for the image pixel... NEF, is Nikon Extended Format.... depending on whose blurb you read... but, it's NOT the actual base values of brightness taken from individual sensor receptors... I don't think any camera makers 'RAW' format is even close TBH, but the NEF format is basically a Jpg... the camera captures the sensor data, processes it to the 'standard' Jpg algorithms, BUT, keeps a note of what decisions it made in that processing, in an 'extended' data-set stored with the image data. Hence Nikon Extended Format.

    Point IS, that jpg, is the 'standard' worked to. And its NOT a bad one, and ultimately whatever steps you go through between pressing the shutter button and beyond, when you get down to it, its likely that JPG format is what you are going to end up with, in whatever you send to a screen, a web-site or a printer......

    NOW, cats and pigeons; PERSONALLY I see very little merit in shooting RAW or NEF, as habit.... do I want to take photo's or play cameras, more play computer games in photo-shop?

    Well... as I type photo-shop is 'open', and I have a couple of dozen 'psd' photo-shop 'raw' files open to mess with; all obtained from a scanner from 35mm negatives out of the archive; I think these particular ones were taken probably by my Grandad, and date stamp suggests they were taken in April 1989; they are half-frame images too, so probably taken with an Olympus OM101, I think... but who the HECK is in them? Well, I think I might be related to a lot of them, but that's another issue........ Scanned into photo-shop via Hamrick, I have captured then at 64bit colour depth, and with 12 times over-scan, and multi-exposure..... I have a LOT of scope for photo-faff.... cleaning up scratches and dust on the negatives; adjusting the colour balance, diddling the exposure, messing with the response curves.... BUT, I STILL cant change the shutter-speed; the aperture or the focus, and only have a very small scope to change the ISO gain.

    You may be able to work miracles in post-process, BUT the impossible, is still the impossible!

    YES I am a photo-shop junkie! I LOVE this chit! Crikey these aren't even MY photo's I'm faffing with at the moment! BUT... what do YOU want to do?

    If I want to 'photo-faff', I have a wonderful collection of old film cameras, that give me every opportunity to faff to my heart's content. My Ziess Ikonta 120 Medium Format 'folder' is a wonderful piece of equipment. Has a 105mm lens as its 'standard angle'; it only has about five shutter speed settings, and maybe six or seven apertures. Has no built in light meter; I have to meter by eye or hand held meter; doesn't even have a view-finder to speak of! Just a wire 'gun-sight' framing guide! This is pure fully manual, manual EVERYTHING unadulterated photo-faff.... and camera takes great photo's on enormous negatives! And there's even more photo-fafff to be had, developing the film, making prints and or scanning to digital, and then all the photo-faff of post process play, to be had....b-u-t....

    The D3200... its 'fast-foto'..... it makes direct to digital images; it has auto-focus, it has auto-exposure; it IS at its simplest point and press convenient..... a four year old could, and has, use it! And I DID NOT spend all that money on that camera, and the lenses to go with it, to inordinately 'FAFF' as much or more than with one of my old clock-work film cameras! I REALLY didn't!

    It has all that automation, so why NOT use it? Let the camera do the stuff it knows 'best' how to do, and let me get on with doing the bits it hasn't got a CLUE how to do.... For ALL that point and press automation, the camera hasn't got a clue what its being pointed at; it has no idea whether its a great composition; it doesn't know which exact moment is 'best' to freeze a kid kicking a football, or to milk a water-fall, it really doesn't.

    The automation is there to HELP you, not hinder... so, I have few qualms about letting it 'help'.... the difficult bit is knowing where it really can....

    As said; RAW formats have very very little scope to actually let you effect any influence over the final display image; yet they demand you use a post-process package to do what the camera could, without your input, and 'faff' to make that a display Jpg, you or any-one else will look at.

    So where MAY RAW or NEF actually start to 'help'? You can still make a LOT of adjustments to a straight jpg, but if the camera has done its job, you probably dont really need to! And if the camera hasn't? Did you give it the chance? Likely a lot you could have done to make a better photo, and having a NEF file, probably wont help you correct it much.

    Like I said, its cat and pigeons, an awful lot of digital exponents will grumble and say "Shoot RAW... JPG is crap! Its like a Mac-Meal compared to home cooked!" Which is probably true... but if you have the culinary skills of my mother, to be able to burn salad FFS... I'm going to go Macy-D's!!!! We are not all Cordon-blue chefs, and probably never will be.... and a frozen microwave meal is still edible... unlike my mother's oven-baked salad!

    So, starting out, you want to learn this photography lark; DONT heap up your plate and give yourself an over-load of chit to get to grips with, chit you likely only have the first clue about, chit you probably have far too optimistic ideas about, and ALL you are likely to do is set yourself up for failure and disappointment, because the 'ideas' about what you 'might' be able to do with raw files or achieve in post process, or can get from going manual exposure, whilst still being a slave to the red-dots of auto-focus, REALLY are way beyond what they might really achieve.....

    You have made that admission, and its another pet hobby horse of mine, BUT. Auto-Exposure systems have been around an awful long time. Longer in fact than I have! I have sat on top of the record player, my Grandad's Konica C35 film camera. Wonderful little thing, and it has the QC stamp on the bottom still, I think marked "1973". At that time it was far from a 'cheap' camera; it retailed in newly decimalised England for about £35 I think; 35mm was the new 'popular' format, that offered 120 rivaling image quality, and 'cheap' colour from movie film stock. It's party trick was an electric eye, that was coupled to the shutter, and took a reflected light meter reading, calculated an exposure value from it, and set both aperture and shutter-speeds for you based on that, and a film speed setting you had dialed in in when you loaded it. It was one of the first sub £50 'point and press' consumer cameras, and Auto-Exposure was its main claim to fame. But that's how long Auto-Exposure has been about, in over the counter consumer cameras. It is well developed, and these days in electric picture makers that can use the actual digi-sensor as a gazillion little light meters, and use umpety million different 'averaging' methods on the values to derive an 'average' exposure value, they are incredibly sophisticated and incredibly accurate....... WHY turn all that 'off' to go 'manual' exposure, still probably a slave to what the meter tells you, to 'faff' making probably the exact same shutter and aperture settings the computer would?! and try using the camera like my old clock-work Sigma, with a swing needle Through Taking Lens, light meter, telling me if I need tweek aperture or shutter settings to level the nedle and have that more chance to pick the wrong ones?

    Auto-Focus? Been around about half as long as I have. I was shown one of the first consumer AF cameras when I was about 10, ISTR, and think it was a Minolta. Very crude device; winding on the film 'cocked' the AF at hyper-focal focus range, then a spring dragged it back to an electric 'stop' based on what the electrics calculated when you pressed the shutter. It was slow, it was inaccurate, it was unreliable, and FAR more so than Auto-Exposure systems....... A-N-D they have NOT got an awful lot 'better'...... Oh-Kay, they have, but only because of how dire the earliest systems were to start with!

    AF is in almost all SLR cameras these days,. and pretty much all digital cameras from mobile phones and action cams up. A lot of the very small micro-sensor cameras rely on the fact that they have an incredibly short focal length lens, with incredibly near hyper-focal distance, and a relatively small lens aperture to give them such Depth or Field, front to back focus, they are essentially 'Focus Free'. Larger format digital cameras still rely on these traits to help make the AF a bit more tolerant and negate the need to be 'so' accurate. BUT, of the automation in a mosern camera its still the least accurate and least reliable and least dependable....

    YET, the "Go Manual Mantra! begs people look for an obvious setting marked "Manual", and they find it on the exposure dial, turn OFF the incredibly well refined and basically pretty simple 'automation' that offers, to make their own effups, sorry aperture and shutter settings... and yet STILL rely on the much more flakey automation of the AF system?!?!?! Eh? Its a little like removing the electric windows from a car with an automatic transmission, cos the racers don't have windows, and expecting it to win a touring car championship!

    Said in other thread what you need is not more gear its STRATEGY, and I don't think this is much different. You are, a bit kiddie-in-the-sweet-shop, full of enthusiasm, reaching for colorful packets, and hoping they will all taste amazing.

    My advice, is to back up, Keep-It-Simple-Silly, and concentrate on just one thing at a time, rather than heaping up the plate with ALL these ideas... a lot of them erroneous or inappropriate.

    And top tip.... there's more to be found INFRONT of the camera then there ever is to be found IN the camera. Spend more time looking through the dang thing than at it. The key to better photo's is Subject, NOT settings.

    You can, to a large extent forget the settings, you can depend on an awful lot of the automation and easement built into a modern electric picture maker, and USE that to let you worry about the things that the cameras electricity just CANNOT help with; finding things worth taking a photo of; composing them in the frame to best effect.. where you have absolutely NO influence prodding buttons or dials on the camera, and even less messing with sliders infront of a computer screen later, but THAT is where better photo's start to be found.

    WHEN you start hitting the buffers and thinking, "Well, that didn't work out!" or "Hmmm, this could be better", THEN... you have probably reached the boundaries of your 'craft' and a little more know how, is probably useful... reach the same point with that know-how, then, maybe a bit of extra gear and some more know-how may help.....

    BUT, at the moment, its likely kiddie-in-the-sweet-shop 'chaos' too many variables, too many conflicting bits of advice, too much research, too little experience, and too many hopes and ideas and aspirations ALL begging you look for solutions to what are probably NOT really problems!

    Keep-It-Simple-Silly...... modern electric picture maker is a wonderful bit of kit with so much automation and easement built in it IS point and shoot friendly a four year old can do it...... no know-how required. Learn to TRUST the camera, and let it do the things its best at; give it some help where its not 'so' comfortable, and do the bits it cant, don't try doing the things it can for it, more slowly, with more faff, and more opportunity for effup, JUST because of some notion of 'going manual' for the sake of it being the 'done thing'.

    It sounds like the camera is over running its buffers because so is its operator! Stop trying SO hard. Take it easy, and take your time, WHERE that time is worth taking. Stop faffing just for the sake of it.

    There is a rather large reveal in this thread in admission that you have taken advice on shooting in NEF for post-process benefit; you are experimenting with aperture priority and shutter priority metering modes, you are pondering different focus schgemes, YET exactly where that is mentioned, you also admit that you HAVEN'T read the bloomin manual that came with the camera!

    I mean, come on, this is like getting a new car, and asking advice from a race driver about heel-and-toe gear-shifting, when you have an automatic micra and haven't even read the hand-book! Isn't it?

    Slow down, back up, and start from the basics, Keep-It-Simple-Silly, and learn to walk before you try and run.

    Odds on, that cutting through the chaos, this buffer over run problem will just disapear and prove itself one of them non-problems!
     
  16. SteveSc

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    (my bold)

    There has been a lot of talk about write speeds, slowing down, etc but as far as I know this would not account for the bit in bold above. The OP says that he stopped taking photos, went to another part of the gallery, changed lens and still it would not take a shot. Can't see any way that would be related to the write speed of a card or the fact that he was taking too many shots to quickly.

    I'm still interested in if the card may have been full. According to this chart by sandisk here a 16gb card in a 16MP camera (which I think is correct for the D5100) would hold approx 286 RAW files, given that he was shooting RAW & Jpeg fine) it seems to me that it could have been a possibility. It would help to know if the problem cleared after the OP deleted some photos from the card.
     
  17. chris malcolm

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    The first time I got a camera capable of shooting repetitive high speed bursts I went out with it with the same old memory card I'd been using for years. I tried shooting breaking waves using high speed bursts. After sometime the camera completely locked up wouldn't do anything for several minutes. I was terrified, thought I'd got salt water spray in it or something. I later discovered that what had happened was simply that I'd created a huge queue of buffered images requiring to be processed, plus started some action which couldn't finish until the buffer was cleared, which took ages.

    Switching to much faster memory cards, and being less ridiculous with bursts, and the problem never recurred.
     
  18. cj4now

    cj4now

    Messages:
    64
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I've had another read through the manual, paying particular attention to the section on focus settings. Coupled with the advice I have been given here I am thinking it could be any one of the points mentioned above and not an actual fault with the camera itself (hopefully). Poor lighting, lack of contrast and a 'busy' frame (lots of similar objects close together) would have led to camera not focusing therefore no shutter release; also, the buffer queue could possibly have contributed and the amount of images on the card may have been an issue as well.
    I've ordered a faster memory card, I needed a back up anyway (the faster one can be my main one now). I'll read the section on focus settings a few more times till it sinks in, and I'll keep the memory card free of clutter.

    @SteveSc Yeah, so far it has been ok since I deleted the files on the memory card. That sandisk chart was helpful, thanks.


    Again, thanks for all your help folks. It's appreciated.............I'll be back tomorrow with a 'new' query! lol
     

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