Beginner Still have blur and exposure issues (relatively new at this)

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13
Name
Gregg
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#1
Hi

Just wondering if someone can give me some pointers?

These are a few pics i took yesterday. As you can see they're a bit blurry and the bottom ones exposure is really bright. What will have caused this? I usually go off my light meter and take them in aperture preferred mode.So i'm guessing I've set the wrong shutter speed?

I do get some good photos when i take the camera out but sometimes it feels like its through pure luck rather than the right settings being set.

Thanks.
IMG_1183.JPG Rabbit: f/1.8, ISO: 100, Exposure 1/200sec
IMG_1247.JPG Bike: f/2.2, ISO:100, Exposure 1/160sec
IMG_1256.JPG Lad: f/1.8, ISO:100 Exposure 1/100sec

When looking at the details the third pictures says that my exposure bias is +1.7 step so i think that answers my question about the brightness/exposure being to bright.

Taken on my canon 350D and 50mm f/1.8 lens
 
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2,913
Name
Rick
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#2
Could you give some details of the camera, lens, settings which were used? Without knowing the shutter speed or ISO it is hard to know. It could be camera shake / movement by the subject. It could be poor focus technique. The exposure issue is likely to be that the rest of the scene is dark so the camera exposes to get that right, and therefore the lighter face and widow are overexposed.

It might be easier to set up a free Flickr account and link for there, that way it will show your setting info unless you tick to deny that.
 
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Mani_LUFC
Messages
13
Name
Gregg
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#3
Could you give some details of the camera, lens, settings which were used? Without knowing the shutter speed or ISO it is hard to know. It could be camera shake / movement by the subject. It could be poor focus technique. The exposure issue is likely to be that the rest of the scene is dark so the camera exposes to get that right, and therefore the lighter face and widow are overexposed.

It might be easier to set up a free Flickr account and link for there, that way it will show your setting info unless you tick to deny that.
Ok thanks. Just nipped our for a bit but will look at getting a Flickr account as I can’t remember the exact settings.

Thanks
 
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23,533
Name
Phil
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#4
So you've answered your own question for the third - the first 2 appear to be misfocussed - can you describe your focus technique for those images please?
 
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Name
Bazza
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#6
Also the first 2 photos look as if the subjects are moving. So the shutter speed needs to increase to freeze the shot. what about putting your camera into continuous focus as I suspect it may be in spot focus on a moving subject
 
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Mani_LUFC
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13
Name
Gregg
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#7
Also the first 2 photos look as if the subjects are moving. So the shutter speed needs to increase to freeze the shot. what about putting your camera into continuous focus as I suspect it may be in spot focus on a moving subject
Just been reading up about spot focus and continuous focus so will have a play around with it next time I’m out with my camera.

There’s so much to learn :oops: :$
 
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22,048
Name
Alan
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#8
Hi

Just wondering if someone can give me some pointers?

These are a few pics i took yesterday. As you can see they're a bit blurry and the bottom ones exposure is really bright. What will have caused this? I usually go off my light meter and take them in aperture preferred mode.So i'm guessing I've set the wrong shutter speed?

I do get some good photos when i take the camera out but sometimes it feels like its through pure luck rather than the right settings being set.

Thanks.

When looking at the details the third pictures says that my exposure bias is +1.7 step so i think that answers my question about the brightness/exposure being to bright.

Taken on my canon 350D and 50mm f/1.8 lens
A good thing to remember is the exposure triangle. It's a combination of shutter speed, aperture setting and ISO. Change one and you'll have to change another to balance things out.

Looking at the settings above I wonder if you're using manual exposure? If you are it may be better to use a semi auto exposure mode, aperture or shutter priority, at least for a while.

Best thing is though that experimenting is pretty much free as you can click away and look at the results and the effect changing things has without having to pay for film to be developed.
 
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3,123
Name
Andy
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#9
The Canon 50 1.8 is quite slow to focus. And it's not very good at moving subjects because of this. Some tips:

Image 1: Likely the camera has misfocused. As that lens is quite slow to focus (though it is a "fast" lens in that it allows a lot of light through so you can have fast shutter speeds), it is likely that the shutter fired before the camera acquired focus properly. Recommendation 1: half-press the shutter button and wait for the lens to focus (likely you'll get a beep, or the little square in the viewfinder will go green), then depress fully. Recommendation 2: you're shooting at f/1.8 so there is only a narrow band of the image that will be in focus, making mis-focus a lot more likely. Suggest you change the aperture to f/5.6 or f/8 to get more of the scene in focus (more "depth of field"). This will reduce the light coming to the sensor, so you will need to a) increase ISO or b) reduce shutter speed (not recommended as camera movement/shake will come into play). Put the camera in P mode and it will sort things out for you.

Image 2: Subject is moving. Lens is slow to focus. Likely you don't have focus mode set to AI Servo. Camera has focused on the subject, which has then moved away. You can see where the focus line is from the road, which is likely where the subject was when you start to acquire focus. Recommendation: Set the camera to AI Servo mode, so it will continuously focus as subjects move. You might as well leave it on AI Servo all the time (I usually do).

Image 3: As said above, you had exposure compensation dialled in probably accidentally. Recommendation: keep an eye on the exposure meter in the bottom of the viewfinder - this will tell you if you have exposure comp set up. I screw this up all the time - it's easy for a dial to get twiddled accidentally. Just get used to checking the ISO, shutter speed, aperture and exposure comp in the viewfinder when you bring the camera to your eye. This is why many people like cameras with visible settings on the dials - it lets you check all the settings before you bring the camera up to your eye - much more intuitive.
 
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