Sunlight direction guide

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#1
A few years ago, I found suncalc.net, it's an excellent site that shows the direction of sunlight and where the sun will be in the sky at any given point during the day, really handy for photography. Sadly, it doesn't look to be working any more, or at least the google maps part isn't working, do any of you have any alternative recommendations please?
 
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Name
Rich
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#8
Only for phones tho. Can't see a thing on a sunnny day tiny screen.
I take a tablet out with me on photo days, got one of the Samsung Tab S2's when they were selling them off
Got the 8" model this time, more portable than the Original Tab S 10.5" I already have
 
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Trevor
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#9
Only for phones tho. Can't see a thing on a sunnny day tiny screen.
Bigger phone maybe? New glasses? I need a big phone and glasses for just that reason. :rolleyes:

I use it on a tablet too - older Samsung ones can be picked up for £80.00 - £100.00. They certainly make it easier. (y)
 
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#11
A few years ago, I found suncalc.net, it's an excellent site that shows the direction of sunlight and where the sun will be in the sky at any given point during the day, really handy for photography.
The sun is always in the east at 6.00 am, in the south at noon and in the west at 6.00 pm. It moves through 15º each hour. Why do you need a calculator?
 
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Kell
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#13
The sun is always in the east at 6.00 am, in the south at noon and in the west at 6.00 pm. It moves through 15º each hour. Why do you need a calculator?
If I stand on the path leading to the lone tree near Priddy, can you tell me on what day and at what time the sun will rise directly behind it please?
This.

Let's say you want to take a shot of a landmark, say Tower Bridge, with the sun setting directly behind it, simply knowing that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west doesn't tell you at what time of the year (or the day) you'll be able to line it up - or which side of the river you'll need to stand.

Knowing where it would be would give you a trajectory on which to stand. And that might will affect when you plan your trip and may affect your lens choice. Or, as in the Tower Bridge example, perhaps you could only do it from the river or the air. You may even find that the thing you had in your head isn't possible at any time of the year and save yourself a wasted trip.
 
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#14
The sun is always in the east at 6.00 am, in the south at noon and in the west at 6.00 pm. It moves through 15º each hour. Why do you need a calculator?
I think you'll find that only works 2 days a year. It is precisely east at exactly 6am on the equinoxes only :)
 
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Ken
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#16
The sun is always in the east at 6.00 am, in the south at noon and in the west at 6.00 pm. It moves through 15º each hour. Why do you need a calculator?
Obviously not in Daylight saving time. Never mind the effects of longitude - sunrise time in Lowestoft and Belfast way apart. Even the Equation of Time comes into play.
Use the Photographers Ephemeris.
 
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Jon
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#17
You can also use Google Earth.

Tony Northrup did a video on it a few weeks ago. I was totally unaware it did it until then.
 
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Dave
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#18
Another vote for the Photographer's Ephemeris. In addition to the position of the Sun(and the Moon) it gives the altitude of both above the horizon and the phase of the Moon, and the web version is free.

Dave
 
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wayne clarke
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#22
Works every single day. Obviously, that is GMT but adding an hour to the time should not be so bad. Sunrise will move but not the position of the sun.
Errr No. Sunrise and sunset position vary a LOT at different times of the year. Take a compass and note the direction of sunset at say Christmas, then check again in June. You'll be supprised how much it's moved around.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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33,567
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#23
Works every single day. Obviously, that is GMT but adding an hour to the time should not be so bad. Sunrise will move but not the position of the sun.

Using TPE and setting the location as the prime meridian, at 07:00 this morning (BST, so 06:00 GMT), the Sun was at 96.6° and 3.1º below the horizon.
 
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