To take better wildlife photos, what should I consider?

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#3
I keep my shutter speed to around 1/1000 and aperture according to what depth of field I want but usually ƒ/5.6 to ƒ/8 - with auto ISO.

Other tips: get to know your quarry. It is worth spending time without your camera in your chosen location. Many animals have favourite paths, sunning spots, look-outs and such that are worth knowing about. Then you can get there early with your camera, set up your tripod and camera, pointing at your chosen spot, and sit down quietly without alarming your quarry.
 
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Ben Factor
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#4
Thanks for the advice!

I'll save the info for when I get my camera and take it out :)
 
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Russell
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#5
Depends also on what camera you intend to use there are many videos on youtube covering about every camera out there that you can use for wildlife. Russ.
 
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Stu
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#6
What type of wildlife images do you make now Ben? What subjects do you like. Mate give the lads an' lasses specifics,more detail,they can help you more. Wildlife is a big field................you possibly wouldn't want the same image making tools or settings for a springtail as you would for say an elephant


From your reply do you have a camera yet? Ben if you don't yet have a camera all is not lost John's second paragraph is your in. you can start this learning curve today and it doesn't need to cost anything Learn everything you possibly can about what wildlife you would like to make an image of. Wildlife photographers call this "stuff" field craft. Go to the places locally you think your subjects might turn up spend hours watching like a hawk be still and quiet. Gradually patterns start to emerge. You can have the best gear in the world but if you aren't where the bird or beastie is you wont make any images of it.

That's where I'd start Ben,ok there is where I did start. the more you know about your subject the more oft you will bump into it. All one has to do then is point the big shiny bit in the right place and press the shutter...simples:LOL::LOL::LOL: Ok the last bit isn't :),but you get my point.

all the luck, get low see what happens

stu
 
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Ben Factor
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#7
What type of wildlife images do you make now Ben? What subjects do you like. Mate give the lads an' lasses specifics,more detail,they can help you more. Wildlife is a big field................you possibly wouldn't want the same image making tools or settings for a springtail as you would for say an elephant


From your reply do you have a camera yet? Ben if you don't yet have a camera all is not lost John's second paragraph is your in. you can start this learning curve today and it doesn't need to cost anything Learn everything you possibly can about what wildlife you would like to make an image of. Wildlife photographers call this "stuff" field craft. Go to the places locally you think your subjects might turn up spend hours watching like a hawk be still and quiet. Gradually patterns start to emerge. You can have the best gear in the world but if you aren't where the bird or beastie is you wont make any images of it.

That's where I'd start Ben,ok there is where I did start. the more you know about your subject the more oft you will bump into it. All one has to do then is point the big shiny bit in the right place and press the shutter...simples:LOL::LOL::LOL: Ok the last bit isn't :),but you get my point.

all the luck, get low see what happens

stu
It is going to be a pretty big trip. Africa, Asia and North and South America so the wildlife will be pretty diverse. Hard to really nail it down.
 
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Will
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#8
I also published a video with some top tips for wildlife photography that should hopefully be of use to you.


As for settings, I always recommend aperture priority mode for wildlife. That or manual with auto ISO. Wildlife moves so fast, with incredibly dynamic lighting conditions in one scene, and so some kind of semi-automation on the exposure (which you can fine-tune easily using exposure comp) removes that variable and allows you to focus on composition rather than constantly spinning the wheel backwards and forwards as an animal runs around in front of you.
 
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