What lens for a wedding?

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#41
No Brian you are taking one post and considering it to be the full and only motive. You do not want to consider that there may be more to it than this.

This forum has a number of small minded keyboard warriors who jump to conclusions. They are the reason I don’t post very often. Why can people not just answer the question posed in the original post and not jump onto their own unrelated pet hobby horse?

None of your comments have any bearing to the question I originally posted.

Do us all a favour and stop posting on this thread. I for one have heard enough from you.
 
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#42
My son gets married in a couple of months and I am wondering what would be the best lens for the day. I only want to carry one lens so whatever I use would need to double up for both the formal group shots and also candid shots taken during the day and also at the evening.

I am looking for Canon EF fitting but not necessarily Canon lenses. At present I have the Canon 70-300L F4 and the Canon 16-35L F4. Neither of these strikes me as being suitable for the day.

Any suggestions.
Hi Martin I can`t help on the lens you need, but I wish you and the family a great day and enjoy taking some images of your sons wedding.
 
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#43
So you’ll be taking group shots over the pros shoulder, I guess you’ll be the one who complains when half the guests in the group photos (professionals) are looking in the wrong direction.

Why would your photos be cheaper to print? Assume they get a USB/Online gallery where they can download and then print at their chosen place?

I get what you’re trying to do, but don’t go in with the attitude that the pro may bugger it all up so you need to get everything as an “insurance”. Go there, enjoy the day and get some more candid stuff. Personally I’d opt for a 35 1.4/1.8
 
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#44
No Brian you are taking one post and considering it to be the full and only motive. You do not want to consider that there may be more to it than this.

This forum has a number of small minded keyboard warriors who jump to conclusions. They are the reason I don’t post very often. Why can people not just answer the question posed in the original post and not jump onto their own unrelated pet hobby horse?

None of your comments have any bearing to the question I originally posted.

Do us all a favour and stop posting on this thread. I for one have heard enough from you.
I'm sorry. I just assumed what you posted was correct.
I hope the day goes well.
I will leave your thread alone. Sorry for disrupting it.
 
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#47
If you're not that bothered about isolation type 'bokeh' and want something with a bit more reach than 70mm, then perhaps have a think about the Canon 24-105 f/4 IS L and see if that will suit your requirements (either a mint used 'low mileage' Mk 1 and hope it's a good one, or a brand new Mk 2 for increased peace of mind)?

There should be plenty of shots from either of those on Flickr for you to have a look at and compare. In optimal conditions it won't be as 'razor-sharp' as the 24-70, but it will be a damned sight better than one of those from 71-105mm, or in situations where image stabilisation would pay dividends.

It's your choice at the end of the day, so it's up to you to do your research, pay your money and take your chance.
 
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#48
I had a Canon 24-105 mark one a while ago and I was very disappointed. It was never really sharp and as you infer not all of these lenses are good ones.

The mark 2 is an option but it is a lot more expensive than the Sigma equivalent. Worth considering both of these if I choose to go for the extra length over the faster 24-70 alternatives.
 
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#50
I would definitely be consider 2.8 or faster.
Are you saying this because of the “improved” bokeh or the better performance in low light situations?

I ask because it is only one stop between 2.8 and 4 and with modern cameras this loss of one stop in low light conditions can be compensated for by increasing the ISO.
 
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#51
I had a Canon 24-105 mark one a while ago and I was very disappointed. It was never really sharp and as you infer not all of these lenses are good ones.

The mark 2 is an option but it is a lot more expensive than the Sigma equivalent. Worth considering both of these if I choose to go for the extra length over the faster 24-70 alternatives.
You know, to be honest, if it were my son's wedding I think I'd probably leave my DSLR at home and just enjoy the day. It'll be over all too soon, and trying to juggle taking photos with mingling and talking to relatives, etc. would do my head in as I know I wouldn't be able to do full justice to both at the same time. Also, with all that wedding stuff going on I would be concerned that I'd have to leave my camera unattended at times, leaving it vulnerable to spills, kids, thieves (sadly nowhere is 100% secure), accidental damage, etc.

So perhaps think about leaving the 'millstone' of a DSLR at home and concentrate on making your son's day as special as you can? These days I'm sure there'll be enough people around with cameras to cover the event even if the wedding photographer/s were to be struck by lightening before taking a single shot! I'd just concentrate on enjoying a memorable day and looking after the guests, and leave taking photos to the 'bit part players' rather than the A-List cast?
 
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#52
Are you saying this because of the “improved” bokeh or the better performance in low light situations?

I ask because it is only one stop between 2.8 and 4 and with modern cameras this loss of one stop in low light conditions can be compensated for by increasing the ISO.
Both really, but mainly low light. It may only be one stop, but shifting one stop at an already high ISO may introduce too much noise.

I’d be using something f1.4-1.8 really.
 
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#53
A Tamron 24-70 F2.8 G2 will be good. £800 from Panamoz. I have the lens myself, great bit of kit.
Depending upon the OP's budget, I'd agree the Tamron 24-70 F2.8 G2 is a superb lens, mine never leaves one of my D750's. Can't fault it. Can't help thinking Martin might not achieve all he expects to do with one lens and keep out of the way of the official photographer. Not what Martin asked, but he could treat himself to a Sony DSC RX100 VI, not cheap, but a very good camera for its compact size, and it would likely be used regularly when he doesn't want to carry his larger kit.
 
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#54
I have already dismissed the 50mm prime above. I hardly think that has the reach to be inconspicuous.

I think you need to decide what you want from the day. Stand at a distance and take photos, or enjoy your sons wedding, a day with your wife, your new daughter in law and the rest of your family?

A 50 or even better a 35 is far less obturisive then pointing a big zoom from a distance
 
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#55
This is all becoming a little surreal. Have any of us been to a wedding and NOT found most of the guests taking pictures pretty much all the time on phones or DSLRs? A decent camera can be much less obtrusive than a phone when used carefully, and the OP doesn't need to make an 4rse of himself by standing in front of the tog to get good pictures. And I know there's something special about your own pictures compared to those taken by someone else. Most of the wedding photographers I've seen over the years also take their pictures and then allow the guests to photograph the scene too before re-organising things.

Martin, my preference would be for a 50mm prime & crop, but since you don't want that then a 24-70/28-70 f2.8 would be ideal, if you can find a compact one. I'm basing that on Canon's relatively poor noise-handling at high ISO - if you had a Nikon FX then I'd probably suggest something with f4 max aperture.
 
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#56
Having others take photos discreetly alongside them gives insurance against the photographer messing up or their equipment failure.
I am NOT a wedding photogrpaher.. far from it.. however I do know one thing for absoloute sure... when the official photogrpaher is taking any setup shots.. group pics... some? of the people in the pic will see you.. because you are the grooms father they will look at you

If one single person in the group picture is looking at you and not the official photographer then that picture is ruined.. and it's your fault.

You think you are doing the right thing but refuse to take advice from professional wedding photogrpahers who know what they are doing.....

PS this is an open photogrpahy forum.. you don't decide what I post.. you can decide to read it or not so no point complaining about the content :)

As to your original question.. The lens your looking for does not exist.. if it did then everyone would have it and no other lens would sell.. You wont find a lens that can do the wide setup shots AND zoom for candids and handle the low light that you will need ..
 
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#57
I am NOT a wedding photogrpaher.. far from it.. however I do know one thing for absoloute sure... when the official photogrpaher is taking any setup shots.. group pics... some? of the people in the pic will see you.. because you are the grooms father they will look at you

If one single person in the group picture is looking at you and not the official photographer then that picture is ruined.. and it's your fault.
@Grumps1974 I do think this is one bit of advice you should listen too. People will look at you, and it will affect the results of the paid photographer, so I would avoid the group shots (which personally I find always leave me cold).

Take your camera, capture the candid moments, have fun and put it away under the table when you get into the swing of the day.

From a purely personal perspective, I think I have looked at the photo's of my wedding perhaps 2-3 times in the past 30 years, it's the memories that count for more for me, and to have the memories, I'd need to be spending most of the day 'in' the wedding, taking part, rather than on the periphery behind a camera.
 
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#58
Enough.

If this thread was entitled should I take my camera to a wedding then the comments about what I should do on the day would be appropriate.

But it is not, the thread is what lens for a wedding. I am amazed at the audacity of all the people who have continued to post after I made my feelings perfectly clear in earlier posts that I am only interested in comments that answer my question.

Let me repeat for the last time these other posts are unwanted, unwelcome and totally irrelevant to the question I asked. Nor do I have the slightest interest in what you have to say.

It really annoys me when people say “If I we’re you”. You are not me and you would all do well to consider the Native American adage “ Do not judge someone until you have walked a mile in his moccasins”.

To those who can understand simple English thank you for all your comments about what lens to take. I will now research the various options and decide which lens I will be using.

The rest of you are now on my ignore list.

Moderators can you remove this thread. I am sorry I posted it. It will be a long time before I seek advice on a thread again.
 

TheBigYin

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#59
Moderators can you remove this thread.
the phrase "If you can't handle the answer. Don't ask the question?" springs to mind to be honest...

you're ignoring anyone who's given you good, sensible advice so far, fine that's your perogative.

but as Kipax said... this is an open photography forum.. you don't get to decide anyone else posts.

Yes, the guy's who've been there as Pro tog's are biased, they've been there doing a paid job when someone has been gallumphing around like you're proposing to do. They KNOW the problems it's caused to them. And, while most of them probably dealt with the issue by complaining to the person who hired them, they also probably know that they could have done a better job, easier, if they hadn't had the issue to deal with.

You say "Do not judge someone until you have walked a mile in his moccasins”... that's EXACTLY what you're doing to the poor tog that's been hired to do the job - you've already decided he's too expensive, and he's going to screw up. So, the pro's on here, who have walked MANY MANY miles in that guy's shoes are telling you not to be the eejit they've had to deal with too many times already.

now, just one or two more bits of advice, pick one.

Enjoy The wedding, soak up the memories, get a bit p***ed, get a bit emotional, and forget the bloody camera.

Or, if you're determined to shoot it, 2 bodies, 24-70 and 75-200 f2.8's.

Have a nice day, and mind the doors chaps - it's clear that the OP doesn't need any further info or advice.
 
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