What mirrorless camera should i buy?

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Hi, I have got currenlty canon 200d which I bought about 2 weeks ago, I realise that i would like more advanced camera and I am thinking of selling it and swiching for mirrorles camera. I am photography student and mostly intrested in wildlife, landscape and micro photography. Which camera do you think will be best and what photolenses should i buy? I am thinking to spend about 1000-1300 pounds.
 
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Keith
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Really depends on a number of factors. What Canon lenses do you have currently? What is it about mirrorless that attracts you? Do you plan to shoot much video? The 200D is a cracking little dslr, the images produced will be the same quality as the 80D, which is twice the price. What do you find restrictive about it?

If you're not tied to Canon, then there's tonnes of options out there, but you have to elaborate a little more on your needs t get better recommendations, giving your budget is a good start, but is this for body only or including lenses?
 
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The budget it is including both but if there will be a better camera with lens 100-300 pound over my budget i would still consider. I am not shooting much video, mostly photos. I have got only EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 III lens. I was wondering if it will be better to upgrade or buy new better lenses. I am very interested in wildlife photography and i am not sure if 9 af points in canon 200d will be enough even with the new lenses. My teacher has reccomend me mirrorless camera and i heard that they are overal better than dslr.
 

Asha

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My teacher has reccomend me mirrorless camera
Has he explained why he reccomends a mirrorless camera?

As a teacher I would have thought he would express more of an interest in the best way for his students to obtain good results from their photography with the kit the they presently possess rather than reccomending a completely different outfit.

A camera is a tool and yes some are better for certain situations than others, but ultimately it is the person behind the camera and his/her skills in photography that obtain the result, not the kit!!
 
OP
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He just said that good mirrorless camera won't be limiting me. So do you think it will be better to keep canon 200d and buy good lenses instead of upgrading?
 
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For wildlife you will really want very fast autofocus, low noise at high ISO settings and probably a crop sensor to increase the effective focal length of your lenses. AFAIK there isn't anything in mirrorless that can compete with a DSLR in all of these areas, and nothing in your budgetary range - M43 users correct me if I'm wrong.

The 'obvious' wildlife camera to me is the Nikon D500, which can be had used for around £900. Good long lenses will always be expensive, but you might be able to pick up a Nikon 70-300 (latest version) for about £500 used.
 

simon ess

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Why is your photography teacher talking about gear rather than photography?

Have you asked?
 
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He just said that good mirrorless camera won't be limiting me. So do you think it will be better to keep canon 200d and buy good lenses instead of upgrading?
I have no idea - what's wrong with the 200d? (I've never touched one)
 

Asha

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He just said that good mirrorless camera won't be limiting me. So do you think it will be better to keep canon 200d and buy good lenses instead of upgrading?
Basically yes!

Before laying out for more lenses, use what you have, shoot everything lol or everything that you enjoy shooting which by doing will show up any limitations in your lenses for personal use ( ie too wide, too long, not enough shallow dof etc etc)
Then it may be worthwhile considering a change in glass or adding additional if your chosen subjects dictate that you need different focal lengths?
The most important thing imo is to be sure in yourself that you as a tog have learnt enough about you gear and able to get as much out of it as possible for the photos that you want before discarding it for something POSSIBLY better or reccomended by someone else who maybe can't take photos as good as you can witha 200d! ;)
 
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I was buying one and i have asked my teacher, but he replied after i bought canon 200d so I was just thinking if i made mistake buying it and if i should replace it.
 

simon ess

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Just take photos.

Or am I missing something?

;)
 
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I have no idea - what's wrong with the 200d? (I've never touched one)
Seems to be the clustered 9 AF points, afaik they are bunched in the center.

For wildlife you will really want very fast autofocus, low noise at high ISO settings and probably a crop sensor to increase the effective focal length of your lenses. AFAIK there isn't anything in mirrorless that can compete with a DSLR in all of these areas, and nothing in your budgetary range - M43 users correct me if I'm wrong.
I was thinking Fuji, their cameras have nippy AF, pretty decent ISO performance and the older models like the XT-2 fall well into the budget allowing plenty leftover for lenses. The 55-200 OIS lens is sharp, has decent OIS and is 300mm FF equiv, so good enough at least for closer wildlife. The only area M43 falls short IMHO, is on the ISO front. Otherwise it is a cheap system that can produce excellent results in good lighting and something like the Panasonic 100-300 offers 600mm equivilant at f/5.6 for not a lot of money. A G9 and 100-300 is just within budget, and there's a tonne of cheap primes for general use besides. But if ISO is a major concern I'd point toward Fuji.

I' not going to comment on the teacher because I don't know them, they may well be excellent at their job, maybe they just suggested that the OP's camera is a bit limited for their needs, maybe OP asked for opinion on it and got just that. Apart from the clustered AF points, the SL2/200D is a very capable little Dslr. If OP can make it work, I'd make a side suggestion of putting that budget into lenses, a 100-400 or so
 
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Which camera do you think will be best and what photolenses should i buy? I am thinking to spend about 1000-1300 pounds.
In your position I would keep what you have already and get a Canon 55-250 IS USM lens or a Canon 70-300 IS USM II on top for wildlife. Learn how to shoot with that and start thinking about upgrading when you understand what is holding you back from getting the shots you want at the quality you want. As others above have pointed out, your equipment is capable of excellent results if you know what you are doing, which is the whole reason you're on a photography course.

For wildlife you will really want very fast autofocus, low noise at high ISO settings and probably a crop sensor to increase the effective focal length of your lenses. AFAIK there isn't anything in mirrorless that can compete with a DSLR in all of these areas, and nothing in your budgetary range - M43 users correct me if I'm wrong.
I don't suggest the OP goes out and buys this, but for £1300, you could get an Olympus E-M1MkI (approx £350 used), a Panasonic 12-32 or 14-45 kit lens (approx £100 used), and the Olympus 40-150 f/2.8 PRO (approx £750 used). If you push the budget out with an additional £150 you could also get the Olympus 60 f/2.8 macro (approx £250 used). This would give you very good autofocus (apart from continuous autofocus which will not be on a par with the best DSLRs, but probably still better than the 200D), a fantastic telephoto and macro lens, and a very good "standard" lens.
 
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So she goes into college and tells them the guys on TP say she's to get another teacher?
Erm, right.
:ROFLMAO:

When you put it that way, to the outside world I'd say we sound like a bunch of elitist pr*cks at the best of times on here.

For all any of us know this teacher is more qualified than even the most seasoned know-it-all pro on here.
 

Asha

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So she goes into college and tells them the guys on TP say she's to get another teacher?
Erm, right.
Erm no!!

There are more diplomatic /polite ways …...Perhaps that is an ability that you lack!
 
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In your position I would keep what you have already and get a Canon 55-250 IS USM lens or a Canon 70-300 IS USM II on top for wildlife. Learn how to shoot with that and start thinking about upgrading when you understand what is holding you back from getting the shots you want at the quality you want. As others above have pointed out, your equipment is capable of excellent results if you know what you are doing, which is the whole reason you're on a photography course.



I don't suggest the OP goes out and buys this, but for £1300, you could get an Olympus E-M1MkI (approx £350 used), a Panasonic 12-32 or 14-45 kit lens (approx £100 used), and the Olympus 40-150 f/2.8 PRO (approx £750 used). If you push the budget out with an additional £150 you could also get the Olympus 60 f/2.8 macro (approx £250 used). This would give you very good autofocus (apart from continuous autofocus which will not be on a par with the best DSLRs, but probably still better than the 200D), a fantastic telephoto and macro lens, and a very good "standard" lens.
What's the E-M1 MkI like for noise? I thought it shared the same sensor as the E-M10 (which I've used) which is poor in that area, and AF speed for BIF etc?
 
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He just said that good mirrorless camera won't be limiting me. So do you think it will be better to keep canon 200d and buy good lenses instead of upgrading?
How? Were we all limited 10 years or so ago before mirrorless? Am I limited now with a D750? How do you feel limited?

My suggestion is you use your kit a lot more, understand what it does and cant do and learn about photography. Then, make an informed decision about what you need.
 
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Hi, I have got currenlty canon 200d which I bought about 2 weeks ago, I realise that i would like more advanced camera and I am thinking of selling it and swiching for mirrorles camera. I am photography student and mostly intrested in wildlife, landscape and micro photography. Which camera do you think will be best and what photolenses should i buy? I am thinking to spend about 1000-1300 pounds.
What type of wildlife shots do you like to take?
 
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Thank you for the answers :)
Kelly, we have quite a wide range of opinions here, expressed in a variety of ways. :p

I *suspect* he suggested mirrorless because that's the direction the world of photographic equipment is moving, however mirrorless cameras are still in development, and do not yet clearly exceed the performance of DSLRs. There's no *need* to buy mirrorless, and only in an exceptional set of circumstances will specific models afford you any positive advantage over a DSLR. Your Canon is fine - acquire a couple of lenses for it as suggested above and go shoot some wildlife. :)
 
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What's the E-M1 MkI like for noise? I thought it shared the same sensor as the E-M10 (which I've used) which is poor in that area, and AF speed for BIF etc?
Not used the em1 but I owned an em5 mk1 for a while and I found it not to bad in low light. I think it might actually be slightly better than my G80 on that score, but the G80 wins in every other way for me. With M43 in general you do need to be more aware about exposing correctly, if anything this is a good thing, you're not relying too much on 'fixing it later in post'. Up to 3200 ISO M43 sensors can do quite well, again, with proper exposing to begin with. If you mostly shoot stills, then the fantastic and oft over looked IBIS on the M43 system can make a huge difference. You don't need to push the ISO, because you can hand hold and get sharp shots up to a second [or more on the likes of the G9 or EM1 mkII] - where on other systems you're having to push the ISO because of much faster shutter speeds. Even other systems that have IBIS can't compete here.
 
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I've been mirrorless for years but I'm trying not to be bias...

If starting now I don't think I'd be buying into DSLR's unless it was for a very good reason that I can't quite think of at the moment... mirrorless is getting better and now that Canikon have entered the market everyone, well, almost everyone, seems to think that mirrorless is the future so why buy into a technology (DSLR's) that is or is going to be outdated?

Not that anyone would ask me what to buy as no one I know seems to be all that interested in dedicated cameras but if someone did ask me I don't think I'd recommend a DSLR.

Things I like about mirrorless are the EVF, in view histogram etc, seeing the exposure and DoF in real time, the focus accuracy and consistency, the ease with which you can manually focus very accurately and the ability to use old film era lenses.

But the OP has just bought a DSLR so unless the kit can be returned for a refund any change to mirrorless could mean a hefty loss on the DSLR kit... but then again keeping it means investing in old tech... Decisions...
 
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What's the E-M1 MkI like for noise? I thought it shared the same sensor as the E-M10 (which I've used) which is poor in that area, and AF speed for BIF etc?
Noise at higher ISOs is a drawback for m4/3 as you rightly point out but OTOH you have an affordable and excellent 80-300mm FOV f/2.8 lens available. If you were mainly hoping to shoot BIF I wouldn't recommend the E-M1MkI, so this is an area where the best DSLRs are probably still a much better bet (or maybe the Sony A9?). The E-M1MkI is no longer the best that m4/3 has to offer but I more or less stopped using my 5DIII once I knew my way around the E-M1MkI.
 

Asha

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Now you're just being daft....perhaps.
Perhaps?? I'm sure you would know, being an expert in that field!

Why don't you do something constructive on here like offer some sensible and practical advice to the OP of this thread, or are you simply bored?

Personally I'm exhausted ……..with you!
 
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But the OP has just bought a DSLR so unless the kit can be returned for a refund any change to mirrorless could mean a hefty loss on the DSLR kit... but then again keeping it means investing in old tech... Decisions...
Good point! @Kelly166 - can you return the 200D? Or do you think you can sell it on easily if not? or plan to keep it alongside any potential ML cameras you might further invest in?

Perhaps?? I'm sure you would know, being an expert in that field!

Why don't you do something constructive on here like offer some sensible and practical advice to the OP of this thread, or are you simply bored?

Personally I'm exhausted ……..with you!
Lads the OP is a newcomer here, let's try help and save the petty squabbling for now. I know, that might be a little rich coming from me, but there's a time and place.
 
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What's the E-M1 MkI like for noise? I thought it shared the same sensor as the E-M10 (which I've used) which is poor in that area, and AF speed for BIF etc?
Dunno about Oly. I have Panasonic GX80 (16mp) and GX9 (20mp) and I can't see any significant difference between them. For whole pictures to be viewed on screen or maybe printed to A4 and viewed normally I'll use any ISO up to and including 25,600. Heavy crops, viewing large prints closely and some artificial lighting will make things worse.

I keep some pictures in a test folder, this is there because it's from the GX80 at ISO 16,000.



I'm sure I have some 25,600 pictures somewhere but they may be people shots and if so I'm not posting :D Under some artificial lighting ISO 1600 can look terrible but the same is true for FF.
 
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Noise at higher ISOs is a drawback for m4/3 as you rightly point out but OTOH you have an affordable and excellent 80-300mm FOV f/2.8 lens available. If you were mainly hoping to shoot BIF I wouldn't recommend the E-M1MkI, so this is an area where the best DSLRs are probably still a much better bet (or maybe the Sony A9?). The E-M1MkI is no longer the best that m4/3 has to offer but I more or less stopped using my 5DIII once I knew my way around the E-M1MkI.
I have made the assumtion that wildlife will include birds and rapidly moving small animals, and also tried to work within the constraints of the budget. I've no idea how well the A9 would cope, but she might need a small mortgage to buy a body and a fast tele combination. :eek: Of course if it's close up photograph of fungi and flowers then that's completely different - but then almost any camera with a macro lens and tripod would work.
 
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Dunno about Oly. I have Panasonic GX80 (16mp) and GX9 (20mp) and I can't see any significant difference between them. For whole pictures to be viewed on screen or maybe printed to A4 and viewed normally I'll use any ISO up to and including 25,600. Heavy crops, viewing large prints closely and some artificial lighting will make things worse.

GX80 at ISO 16,000.



Under some lighting ISO 1600 can look terrible but the same is true for FF.
You're a much braver man than me I have to say! I set my M43 cams to ISO 3200 limit, for the rare occasions I use Auto ISO. Mostly I manually control it and prefer to stay below 1600. But ... I am a mostly stills shooter, so I can drop shutter speeds easily to help with that. It's all about having the options and what you're comfortable with. But I agree, M43 files cn be perfectly usable at higher ISO levels, you will get more grain than FF or even the better APSC, but I find the grain you do get to be easy to work with, or that ol' cliche - 'film like grain' - where it feels more organic, rather than digital mush

interesting side fact btw, M43 sensors have better DR than most Canon APSC
 
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I'll use any setting to get the picture, if it's terrible at least I've tried :D With squirrels low shutter speeds really aren't much of an option.
 
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I'll use any setting to get the picture, if it's terrible at least I've tried :D With squirrels low shutter speeds really aren't much of an option.
For sure, I've photographed fast small birds in the garden, and they aint staying still for millisecond for your pleasure - it's pump it or forget a'bou'tit :D
 
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I'll use any setting to get the picture, if it's terrible at least I've tried :D With squirrels low shutter speeds really aren't much of an option.
That's fair enough. I made the suggestion I did because the D500 is known to be exceptional in this application, and is also affordable. SK66 has done some remarkable photography with his, and the noise control and AF are really outstanding.
 
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Hi, I have got currenlty canon 200d which I bought about 2 weeks ago, I realise that i would like more advanced camera and I am thinking of selling it and swiching for mirrorles camera. I am photography student and mostly intrested in wildlife, landscape and micro photography. Which camera do you think will be best and what photolenses should i buy? I am thinking to spend about 1000-1300 pounds.
@Kelly166
Hi Kelly

You have already had a wide ranging set of replies................but let me offer my perspective.

The Canon 200D is a 24.2MP sensor camera with max 5fps for burst shooting you can use any of the many lenses in Canon EF of EF-S mount.

FWIW my first dSLR was a Canon 350D (8MP) then the 40D (10.1MP) and both were capable of taking some great shots of all the subjects you mention....................but yes, they had limitations that is why I upgraded over time as met the limits that were affecting my efforts. (Note ~ I also had the Canon 7D and Canon 5D mk3 but have since moved into Olympus E-M1 mk2. Lens wise I have had Canon 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 60mm Micro, 100-400mm zoom ~ and now suitable lens in Olympus to cover the 24mm to 300mm range. But please realise that choices to upgrade and and add kit are very dependant on just what I was photographing.)

So, with the 200D and its 18-55 lens you already have a good general purpose combination that at the very least will "work" for landscapes (out of your choices of genre).
Therefore rather than buy a new body concentrate on adding lenses ~ for wildlife the minimum would be a 70-300mm zoom and for macro(micro) try to find a secondhand Canon 60mm macro lens.

As noted above, until you have found the limits of the kit to hand you will never quite know why and what you are seeking.

I do find it odd that the teacher is recommending one specific technology 'mirrorless' over dSLR..........................you and your fellows are students IMO he should not be "recommending" kit without qualified justification. His skillset should cover how each student, on a one to one basis, can get the best they can from the kit they have. Only then advising how they may improve based on different additions to the kit.

Do please get out there and enjoy learning how to use the camera and wring the best from it before you needlessly spend money on it rather than lenses to extend the scope of what they might yield for you. It is not all about classroom learning ;)

PS Kelly, you have not said what type of course you are taking? Is it a college course leading to some sort of academic qualification or one more about learning 'how to use the camera' and 'how to use the computer software' to organise and post process your pictures???
 
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