What mirrorless camera should i buy?

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Alf
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Its strange thing to recomend in my opinion.

I havent used a DSLR since 2014.

Go to a good shop try not to be influenced too much by the staff especially if they are wearing particular brand printed or embroidered on thier clothes. try some some stuff out and see how you find it suits you. A higher Canon model maybe what you want to move to. It may be that you love something else as long it allows the control and felexibility you need go for it.
 
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droj
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My teacher has reccomend me mirrorless camera and i heard that they are overal better than dslr.
That's a nonsense and shouldn't be your core criterion.
I am very interested in wildlife photography and i am not sure if 9 af points in canon 200d will be enough.
Wildlife is a bit vague. Do you mean birds at a feeder, or wild things further away and maybe moving fast, like birds in flight?

Because there's little point in over-specifying and over-spending.

The thing with cameras is what they're like in the hand, what they're like to look through, and whether they do what you want. You might be right about the focus points.

Lenses can get expensive, & lenses can get heavy. Have a long think about this. How much stuff do you want to carry about routinely?

Think priorities. Evolve a scheme. No easy answer - it's all work.
 
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Bob
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For wildlife you could use your existing camera, and consider a used sigma 150-600mm lens.
This would get you decent images, and get you close enough without having to crop too much.
You might struggle with birds in flight and fast action, but you'd still have plenty of scope for some great shots.
With wildlife, the craft is often more important than the gear. Study the wildlife you are interested in, learn about their habitat, behaviours etc and all of this can get you better images than spending a fortune on gear you don't need.
Only when you reach the limits of your equipment should you be looking to replace it, and by then, you will know exactly what you are lacking.
 
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OP
K
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@Kelly166
Hi Kelly

You have already had a wide ranging set of replies................but let me offer my perspective.

The Canon 200D is a 24.2MP sensor camera with max 5fps for burst shooting you can use any of the many lenses in Canon EF of EF-S mount.

FWIW my first dSLR was a Canon 350D (8MP) then the 40D (10.1MP) and both were capable of taking some great shots of all the subjects you mention....................but yes, they had limitations that is why I upgraded over time as met the limits that were affecting my efforts. (Note ~ I also had the Canon 7D and Canon 5D mk3 but have since moved into Olympus E-M1 mk2. Lens wise I have had Canon 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 60mm Micro, 100-400mm zoom ~ and now suitable lens in Olympus to cover the 24mm to 300mm range. But please realise that choices to upgrade and and add kit are very dependant on just what I was photographing.)

So, with the 200D and its 18-55 lens you already have a good general purpose combination that at the very least will "work" for landscapes (out of your choices of genre).
Therefore rather than buy a new body concentrate on adding lenses ~ for wildlife the minimum would be a 70-300mm zoom and for macro(micro) try to find a secondhand Canon 60mm macro lens.

As noted above, until you have found the limits of the kit to hand you will never quite know why and what you are seeking.

I do find it odd that the teacher is recommending one specific technology 'mirrorless' over dSLR..........................you and your fellows are students IMO he should not be "recommending" kit without qualified justification. His skillset should cover how each student, on a one to one basis, can get the best they can from the kit they have. Only then advising how they may improve based on different additions to the kit.

Do please get out there and enjoy learning how to use the camera and wring the best from it before you needlessly spend money on it rather than lenses to extend the scope of what they might yield for you. It is not all about classroom learning ;)

PS Kelly, you have not said what type of course you are taking? Is it a college course leading to some sort of academic qualification or one more about learning 'how to use the camera' and 'how to use the computer software' to organise and post process your pictures???
Thank you for the answer, i am currently studying at university.
 
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Soeren
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A Lot of this thread shows what happens when people takes off from out of context fragments from a dialoque without filters, sigh.
Kelly. A mirrorless wont limit you just as well as your current camera will be fine for quite some time.
What you should think about in your work is which focallength lenses, which features and what kind of accesories you need to make the images you want and if something lacks how to work arround that issue. Then after some time you know what to look for in your next system.
 
OP
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Unfortunately i can not return it but maybe it will be a good choice to sell it, and replace with olympus e-m1 mk1 and some good lenses. I am not planning to change the gear in few years so maybe it will be a good choice to change it now? I am still not sure if it will be better to keep the cannon 200. Olympus got a lot of better features: faster shutter, faster burst
 

Fraser Euan White

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Fraser White
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£1000 - £1300 is a massive amount of money!

Don't spend anything!

If you have to ask the initial question then you don't know enough to make your own decisions on what you need; don't let others do it for you as it will be wrong!

It is so easy when starting out to pick a genre but as you progress that choice may well change,

Don't buy any lenses yet. Pick one lens and the camera you currently have and take photo's with it; a standard 35 to 50mm lens is perfect for photography.

Use your money to get out and about to take pictures of everything; ignore the 'gear heads' on here.

I can't remeber the last picture I took where I didn't use a 'standard' focal length lens and IMO my photography is better & more enjoyable than it has ever been.
 
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Bazza
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Kelly you have bought a decent camera so get used to using it first, no point in P/X it for a mirrorless one as you will loose a lot of money. Your teacher may well have made that suggestion in your best interests but not in your present photographic skills. I would say stay with what you have bought and learn how to get the best out of it, you may, and suspect will, find it suits your needs for the forseeable future.
Photographic equipment is always changing so manufactures can keep selling, in a couple of years time something else might grab your attention and you go for that instead.
 
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Simon
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Unfortunately i can not return it but maybe it will be a good choice to sell it, and replace with olympus e-m1 mk1 and some good lenses. I am not planning to change the gear in few years so maybe it will be a good choice to change it now? I am still not sure if it will be better to keep the cannon 200. Olympus got a lot of better features: faster shutter, faster burst
No, no, no, no!!!!

Happy to be corrected as don't really know either system but the Canon is the better camera after a quick search. For a start, the Oly came out in 2013. Sure, being old does not make it bad but the only way I would go for a camera of that age would be if it was a high end one (like a D4, D800 etc...). You have 24 v 16 MP which means better cropping (for wildlife) and you have a DX sensor rather than a 4/3 which is better at higher ISO (useful for higher s/s and non-pro glass). As Bazza says above, get to grips with photography first.
 
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Maarten
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Unfortunately i can not return it but maybe it will be a good choice to sell it, and replace with olympus e-m1 mk1 and some good lenses. I am not planning to change the gear in few years so maybe it will be a good choice to change it now? I am still not sure if it will be better to keep the cannon 200. Olympus got a lot of better features: faster shutter, faster burst
Hi Kelly - apologies I shouldn't have confused the discussion with the E-M1MkI. I have both Canon and Olympus and I think for now you should stick with the 200D. Selling new camera gear is a great way to lose money and you should not do this until you know how the 200D is holding you back in my opinion. For wildlife you probably need to get a longer lens at some stage which is why I suggested the Canon 55-250 IS USM or the Canon 70-300 IS USM II. This will save money in the short term until you have improved your photography skills and at that point you will be in a better position to judge how best to spend £1300.
 
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Toni
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Just had a quick read up this morning about your 200D - it does sound like a decent camera, and certainly a good entry point.

Don't replace it, but do start taking pictures of the things you want to photograph and see how you get on. :)
 
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Toni
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Thank you for help :) I think I will stay with canon 200D :) i just wanted ask if those camera features and very good lenses will allow me to achieve effect like this? :
The middle image could be produced with the kit you have now + a tripod and neutral density filters to increase exposure time. For the first image you'd need a long telephoto lens, probably between 500mm and 1000mm focal length and for the last you would need a macro lens for close-up work. On top of that you will need software to process the images after you've taken them (none of those are likely to have looked exactly like that straight from camera).

Something worth mentioning is that photography isn't just about the kit. It's about how the light works with a scene, and knowing how the kit you have will respond so that you can create the picture you want.

One more thing I should also mention - those images you've posted are copyrighted to the people who took them, and posting them here without their permission is breaking that copyright. Where you want to show other people's pictures, the way to do it is to post a link to the original image rather than taking a screen-grab or posting the picture itself.
 
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Why do you need a more advanced camera?
Unless you have reached the maximum use of you 200D (which I doubt) then stick with it and buy some lenses.
There are plenty of uses here who used older bodies like the 400D / 450D and 40D with a 9 point AF who produced cracking photos and your 200D can produce better photos with the right lens.
If you really get into wildlife photography then at some point you'll probaby require either a 100-400 or a 150-600 lens, I wont mention long focal length prime lenses due to the cost.
I'm still waiting to see wildlife photos posted on here from members using a mirrorless body and a long focal length lens (although I may have missed the posts so anyone doing this please feel free to link to your posts).
If you need a lighter body or if there are other reasons you want to switch bodies then fine.
If I were you I'd be inclined to tell your teacher to join this forum so some of us could tell them that your recent purchase of a 200D is not wasted and why you don't need to mirorless just yet.
One day mirrorless bodies will out sell DSLR's which is fine but there a lot of people on here with far more photography experience than you who are very happy to carry on using their DSLR's for quite a while.
 
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Keith
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Most of my wildlife shots are taken with a single af point.
Most of my overall images were shot with single AF. It's nice to have the option when you want to focus on a specific subject, especially now with touch screen AF - but certainly not a necessity. OP already has touch AF I believe with the 200D, but it will be restricted to the more central area.

The new trend is a bazillion AF points nobody really needs and all this face/eye detection - as if we've all forgotten how to keep faces sharp without it. Modern photographers are so needy! It irritates me that eye detection is now a must or it's a con to reviewers.

Thank you for help :) I think I will stay with canon 200D :) i just wanted ask if those camera features and very good lenses will allow me to achieve effect like this? :
Of course it can, almost any modern camera is capable in the right hands. Maybe push your teacher for good reason to switch to a mirrorless, what does he think is lacking on your 200D besides the tight AF points? Lenses will always be more important than the body used. Your camera is one of the most up to date dslrs out there, it's got everything a mirrorless alternative [like the M50] would have apart from an evf. Sure, a better spread of AF points would be nice, but as others mentioned, most people tend to just use the more central AF points anyway.
 
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