Why does 35mm film come in plastic pots when 120 film is in foil?

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Des
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#1
As per title, is there a reason for the difference? A quick google didn't come up with a definitive answer.

One suggested to stop condensation if the film was kept in a fridge but that doesn't explain why 120mm film doesn't.

The pots are very useful for lots of things but it does seem like packaging overkill if not required.

Any bright ideas?
 
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Lindsay
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#2
I like the tin pots that 35mm film used to come in, with the screw lid. Before my time, but I have a couple with one of my dad's old Leica outfits, used to hold other stuff.
 
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droj
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#3
I assume that it's to protect the cassette mouth where the film exits against impact damage or rough handling. 120 etc film wouldn't have this requirement since it's on a reel, not in a cassette.
 

MartynK

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#4
I remember the screw top metal canisters, and they were useful. Anyone know when they were discontinued? They still turn up on eBay, but they seem to be collectors' items now!
 
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#5
I assume that it's to protect the cassette mouth where the film exits against impact damage or rough handling. 120 etc film wouldn't have this requirement since it's on a reel, not in a cassette.
And taking this another step, maybe the cassette mouth was found to damage or puncture foil? :thinking:
 

StephenM

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#6
I suppose one explanation is as good as another; here's Jack Coote's:

To extend its useful life, the emulsion layer of a film should be
maintained for as long as possible in the controlled atmospheric
conditions under which it was packed. With this in mind, finished
films are often enclosed in hermetically sealed, metal-foil
wrappings. This method of protection has the disadvantage that it
takes some time to remove the foil wrapping before the film can be
loaded into a camera. For a press photographer a better alternative
is to buy the film in airtight plastic tubs with easily removable
'press-on' caps.


As he used to work for Ilford, it just might be a good guess on his part.
 

StephenM

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#7
PS Source: Monochrome Darkroom Practice, 2nd ed.
 
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#8
According to Simon Galley of Ilford at the attached Photorio/APUG link: https://www.photrio.com/forum/threads/why-do-35mm-films-come-in-nice-plastic-canister.100170/print
35mm films have a 'tail' that sticks out of the cassette, since the packing lines are totally automatic you need to 'tub' the film or you would not be able to package automatically without fear of damaging the tail, or at least higher waste at that packaging stage, in addition, once tubbed the films are fully protected from damage and moisture and ingestion of potentially damaging gases etc, etc they also obviously form the strength in the boxed surround, and they stack on shelves...hence why they are boxed.

As someone says...ahhh but you only foil the film in the 50 roll bulk packs of film you sell?

Absolutely correct, we do, and because of that we have to use a different finishing route that has a manual element plus significant 'oversee' and actually costs significantly more to produce, but having 50 tubbed plastic films in one box would not be very eco-friendly and as we all know being eco friendly is not always cheap....but it is the correct thing to do.

Simon. ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited
 
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#10
I think Kevin's cracked it.

:plus1:
 

RaglanSurf

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Nick
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#11
Iirc Adox 120 used to come in plastic pots as well, don’t know if it still does.
 
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#13
Iirc Adox 120 used to come in plastic pots as well, don’t know if it still does.
Some 120 Rollei films came in black pots and I re-use them for exposed film. You can buy them seperately from a few places.
I also have a double 35mm black pot that Rollei issued - to hold enough toothpaste for a couple, for a weekend ...
 
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#15
When you reload the cassettes from bulk film what would you store them in? You couldn’t re-use foil packaging.
 

Asha

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#16
35mm film cannisters were specifically designed to hold enough toothpaste for a weekend backpacking trip, enough coffee for a weekend backpacking trip, etc.
Nah, like cardboard boxes, toilet roll tubes and balls of wool, they were designed purely to entertain puddy tats!:LOL:
 
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