Beginner Bands

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#1
I’d like to be a photographer for bands and live performances, and I was wondering what the best equipment is for this type of photography and how to start getting in to this? :jaffano:
 
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Alan
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#2
This is something that got me more into photography decades ago :D back in the days of film :D

Back then I had a 35mm SLR, a variable aperture zoom which I often shot wide open and ISO 1600 film. When I used flash it was the built in one whilst probably exposing for the lighting in the venue. If doing it again these days I'd use a wider aperture lens for the non flash pictures and the same technique for the flash pictures, f3.5/4/5.6/8 to suit and 1/10-40. I'd expect the low light results to be a lot better these days.

Anyway, camera... anything, a "normal" lens (a 28, 35 or 50mm or equivalent f1.8 or f1.4 prime or a standard range f2.8 zoom) and a mounted flash so that you'll do better than I ever did.
 
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Mike
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#3
This is something that got me more into photography decades ago :D back in the days of film :D


Anyway, camera... anything, a "normal" lens (a 28, 35 or 50mm or equivalent f1.8 or f1.4 prime or a standard range f2.8 zoom) and a mounted flash so that you'll do better than I ever did.
At most music venues a mounted flash is a BIG no no!!
A couple of friends of mine do this sort of photography.
They normally shoot with 2 camera bodies - one with a 70-200 f2.8, the other with a wide angle 2.8 zoom.
They get a photo pass that allows them 10-20 minutes at the start of the gig then its out the door if they haven't bought a ticket.
 
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Alan
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#4
I never pointed a flash at the stage but did use it for posed people shots away from the act. In those days no one I knew had a flash unit, not one. You were lucky if you had a camera :D
 
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Name
Graham
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#5
I do loads of this kind of stuff. Feel free to have a snoop around my Flickr site in my sig. and I'll try to help with any specific questions you have.
How to start and the best equipment?
Start in pubs and clubs or get to know a local band an ask if you can photograph them. The best equipment is the equipment you already have, use and find it's limitations and then you'll have a good idea as to what you need.
 
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Malc
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#6
Fuji X-T3 is my camera, and the most used lens for live gig work is my trusty little 35mm f/1.4 - great for low-light shooting. I also use the 50-140 f/2.8 a lot for closer shots of individual band members.
As for getting started, there are plenty of free gigs so experiment with settings, angles and your lenses until you see what works for you.
 
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Graham
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#7
Fuji X-T3 is my camera, and the most used lens for live gig work is my trusty little 35mm f/1.4 - great for low-light shooting. I also use the 50-140 f/2.8 a lot for closer shots of individual band members.
As for getting started, there are plenty of free gigs so experiment with settings, angles and your lenses until you see what works for you.
So I'm not the only Fuji user in the pit!
Spent 30 odd years photographing performance (Festivals, pub gigs, folk clubs, jazz clubs orchestral and theatrical) with Nikon... just gone full Fuji...it's different but fun. :)
 

Dave70D

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Hi Ho Silver away !
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#8
For bands and vocalists I use Fuji X series, but you can use any system going. As has been said, the big NO NO is do not use flash as they don`t want to be blinded while they are singing. I do more outdoor shooting but every so often I go to Jazz do`s with my cameras. When I started to follow the singers to the pubs, I`d ask the landlord if taking photos was fine and when that came back as a yes please do I started to follow some of my favourites.

https://www.talkphotography.co.uk/threads/vocalists-jazz-bands-and-photoshoots.689955/
 
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