Bet the use of this upsets some

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#1
I bought this new, yes when it first came out and STILL use it today

I use it when using a 10 stopper, saves constantly removing and attaching it to meter.

I use both incident and reflective metering depending on what I am imaging, I bet there are photographers today who don't even know what it is

I bought it from the Camera shop in Aldershot in 1973, I could not afford it all at once and paid 10s a week that is 10 shillings, last year I bought a mint Euromaster 2


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#4
I bought this new, yes when it first came out and STILL use it today

I use it when using a 10 stopper, saves constantly removing and attaching it to meter.

I use both incident and reflective metering depending on what I am imaging, I bet there are photographers today who don't even know what it is

I bought it from the Camera shop in Aldershot in 1973, I could not afford it all at once and paid 10s a week that is 10 shillings, last year I bought a mint Euromaster 2


View attachment 252104
Ah! nostalgia trip......I still have my MkV that I bought about the same time I got my ex MoD Rolleiflex TLR in I think the early 1990's :)
Tis a light meter young whippersnapper, no battery required 'cos it has a selenium light sensitive cell in it.......old school gear that still had s place in today's photography when, as above, it is needed ;)
 
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#5
I've used a few Westons over the years and the Euromaster was the one I liked best. The Invercone was superb for backlit shots like this one on my Mamiya C330F...

ShallowsatTopsham.jpg
 
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#7
I've used a few Westons over the years and the Euromaster was the one I liked best. The Invercone was superb for backlit shots like this one on my Mamiya C330F...

View attachment 252105


100% slip on the invercone, hold meter over your shoulder for 100% accurate readings a full on dslr will not do
 
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#8
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#9
The Weston meters are still my favourite. No batteries and great design for incident light.
 
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#11
If I were to say just how accurate this is few would believe me, as is the Mk 2. I also had a Minolts Flashmeter 4 and 5, but always went back to my Westons
 
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#13
I use a Gossen Lunasix 3 (the Luna part reputedly refers to the meter being sensitive enough to take readings in moonlight).

However, these days I use a smartphone app that cost lest than £3 and is always with me on my phone and seems just as accurate in normal daylight conditions for reflected light readings. I've not use the incident light meter option on it yet, so don't know if that's as accurate.
 
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#14
I even have a Sekonic i-308s but never used it!
I use mine for luminance readings. Haven't used it for photography for several years.
 
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#15
See, I don't want to use a phone, in fact I never take it out with me, rarely know where it is, though I have taught IT and still build computers.

I like the meter, for example just been shooting with the EM2, on the left, when made they were set/calibrated for Kodak 64 slide, so accurate, it is still accurate

What people forget is that a keter allows you to instantly see all the available shutter speeds and apertures available see image, so it is a great boon for landscape in MY (have to say MY or some take issue with me) opinion, especially long time exposures.
 

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#16
I had one once too, I didn't think it was that light ;)

I've not used one, even a flash meter, for many a year now as its too often impractical or too slow for what & how I shoot

Dave
 
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#17
I am a lot younger so only shot digital.

I don't really do long exposures but tend to use histogram live view preview on the digital cameras. I dare say these have their uses for film shooter but modern digital camera's require modern techniques and understanding histograms - not independent light meters.
 
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#19
I am a lot younger so only shot digital.

I don't really do long exposures but tend to use histogram live view preview on the digital cameras. I dare say these have their uses for film shooter but modern digital camera's require modern techniques and understanding histograms - not independent light meters.
Interesting - I never use the histogram or live view

Another case of more than one way to skin the old moggy :)

Dave
 
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#20
I am a lot younger so only shot digital.

I don't really do long exposures but tend to use histogram live view preview on the digital cameras. I dare say these have their uses for film shooter but modern digital camera's require modern techniques and understanding histograms - not independent light meters.
I'm the opposite, I've never used a histogram in my life and I've survived OK so far. :)
 
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#21
Not sure why it’s use would upset anyone?

I’m currently in Vietnam and am using my trusty Sekonic to meter. Even when I use a film camera with a meter, I tend to use handheld and ignore the one in the camera and always had good results from the lab.

Yes, you can get an app but having a light meter is, in my opinion, quicker and easier than taking out a phone, unlocking it, opening the app, metering, putting phone away and shooting.

I have the meter on its string, lift and click, adjust camera and shoot.

The only exception will be if I ever get my hands on an M6/MP.
 
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#22
I have an old Sekonic Studio Deluxe that I used with my Bronica outfit (no metering).

1565351335073.png

Light meters are really useful if you know how to use them, but sometimes just measuring incident light without the tolerance to over-exposure of negative film can cause blown highlights. :)

I'm sure @Phil V would remind us that digital cameras have quite functional light meters built right in, but there's no reason not to use a hand-held lightmeter if it brings you pleasure and your pictures come out OK.
 
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#23
I have a Leningrad 7 for sale on eBay in it's original leather case. It's a... primitive... thing that I will be glad to see the back of. My M3 has the super little Voigtlander VCII which is really very convenient and easy to use, but it's nowhere near as convenient as in-camera. And finally I have a Minolta Spotmeter M which I absolutely love when shooting medium/large format. Getting the composition right first, then being able to take various readings from different parts of the scene allows really accurate, controlled metering - especially on the less forgiving slide film.
 
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#24
Getting the composition right first, then being able to take various readings from different parts of the scene allows really accurate, controlled metering - especially on the less forgiving slide film.
When I was a teenager I used to have fun shooting 'the less forgiving slide film' in old box cameras with a single shutter speed and a choice of two apertures, or no choice at all, and the shots I got were fine... However, this was because I learnt to match the ISO (100, 200 or 400 ASA Ektachrome) of the film to the daylight conditions I was shooting in, and took photographs when the light was right for the chosen film. A version of the 'sunny 16' method.

These days with digital cameras that have inbuilt multi-zone meters and multi-mode automatic exposure with a huge range of shutter speeds, apertures and auto ISO it's probably never been as easy and required less photographic knowledge to get accurately exposed images. Not that that's a bad thing, as it should give us more time to concentrate on the image itself.
 
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#25
I have an old Sekonic Studio Deluxe that I used with my Bronica outfit (no metering).

View attachment 252108

Light meters are really useful if you know how to use them, but sometimes just measuring incident light without the tolerance to over-exposure of negative film can cause blown highlights. :)

I'm sure @Phil V would remind us that digital cameras have quite functional light meters built right in, but there's no reason not to use a hand-held lightmeter if it brings you pleasure and your pictures come out OK.
Well I’ve got a couple of light meters, I’ve always been a ‘whatever makes you happy’ kind of photographer. My personal working methods are based round keeping it simple, but I appreciate that some people get enjoyment from the ‘process’ more than the image.
Just like some people think ‘jogging’ is fun, it’s weird to me but I don’t judge.
 
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#26
I am a lot younger so only shot digital.

I don't really do long exposures but tend to use histogram live view preview on the digital cameras. I dare say these have their uses for film shooter but modern digital camera's require modern techniques and understanding histograms - not independent light meters.
Untrue, and they are still sold by the million today from £100 to thousands, just because someone does not appreciate/understand their use does not make them useless, I know of many who use studio light meters, and landscape

Film shooters :) :) :)............................... NO not just

https://www.photographycourses.biz/videos/technical/exposure/how_to_use_a_light_meter_2.html
 
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#27
Oh and like Mr badger I too have NEVER used a Histogram (well rarely), just as I can count on one hand the times I have used "P" and "A" only "M"

You don't need to be a mechanic or know how a cars engine works but any "motorist" will tell you that it is a benefit to have some mechanical knowledge.

But the point is being missed here by some, take a reading with your camera, you get ONE reading, (I rarely VERY rarely EVER shoot in anything other than manual, is that also wrong) just one reading, the meter allows you to see and adjust settings at a glance, one reading now you see all the variations, and with one turn you can change the iso and get all the adjusted readings, never removing a filter to re meter with the camera.

Of course, you don't use a hand held meter all the time, I have not said you do, when shooting sports I don't, there is a time and place, also anyone who has not use a hand held meter is commenting from a position of No experience, it would be like saying zoom lenses are not as good as prime never having used a good one

Perhaps it is just the difference between people who learned photography and those who just buy a camera and go no further............. says he duking ;)

dfgby.jpg
 
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#29
Oh and like Mr badger I too have NEVER used a Histogram (well rarely), just as I can count on one hand the times I have used "P" and "A" only "M"
There I have to part company with you. I make the majority of my shots on the "Intelligent Auto" mode. On the rare cases it fails it's still close enough to rescue in a decent editor. Sure, back when the choice was between buying a meter or film I used the sunny 16 rule. Now though, I'm happy to let the programming do the basics while I get on with choosing the moment and the composition.
 
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#30
I’ve got three meters myself, a Sekonic 308 that’s small enough to keep in my everyday carry, a 358 in my medium format/flash bag and a Pentax Digital Spot in my large format bag.

Using a meter saves me time further along the workflow, pulling 20 contact prints at once all with a similar density from the processor is supremely satisfying. Same thing when I’m seeing Lightroom preview the images on my screen as well, there less junk for me to sort through.
 
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#31
Untrue, and they are still sold by the million today from £100 to thousands, just because someone does not appreciate/understand their use does not make them useless, I know of many who use studio light meters, and landscape

Film shooters :) :) :)............................... NO not just

https://www.photographycourses.biz/videos/technical/exposure/how_to_use_a_light_meter_2.html
I’m happy with the way I work out exposure. Clearly so are you. So great.

I would though suggest you learn about histograms and the different ones for Red, Green and Blue as they’re a fundamental part of a digital photography workflow from exposure to how you process.
 
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#32
I've got 2 light meters, one I've had since the early eighties.
Haven't used it for years, as I don't need to.
I don't need a separate light meter to show me the many variations.
I don't take so many readings that a meter would be beneficial.
I slide my 10 stop up in the holder if I need to check a reading. Just as quick for me as using a meter.
I rarely use manual either unless I'm using studio lights etc. I tend to use Aperture priority mode for pretty much everything, unless I need a fast shutter speed for action, then I use shutter priority mode.

I have no issues with what equipment, modes or anything else that anyone uses, as it has absolutely no impact on me whatsoever. :)
 
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#33
I still have a "Gossen Lunasix F" meter that I still use for my exterior 5x4 film work, and as a flash meter for all my studio work. Other than that all my digital shots rely on the cameras built in meter.

George.
 
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#34
I have an old Sekonic Studio Deluxe that I used with my Bronica outfit (no metering).

View attachment 252108

Light meters are really useful if you know how to use them, but sometimes just measuring incident light without the tolerance to over-exposure of negative film can cause blown highlights. :)

I'm sure @Phil V would remind us that digital cameras have quite functional light meters built right in, but there's no reason not to use a hand-held lightmeter if it brings you pleasure and your pictures come out OK.

Oh dear, you have what was my DREAM meter. when I got the Weston, I was in my early teens and this was not only too expensive (the one then, but too complicated for me
 
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#35
I still have a "Gossen Lunasix F" meter that I still use for my exterior 5x4 film work, and as a flash meter for all my studio work. Other than that all my digital shots rely on the cameras built in meter.

George.

I wanted one, too expensive for me
 
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#36
There I have to part company with you. I make the majority of my shots on the "Intelligent Auto" mode. On the rare cases it fails it's still close enough to rescue in a decent editor. Sure, back when the choice was between buying a meter or film I used the sunny 16 rule. Now though, I'm happy to let the programming do the basics while I get on with choosing the moment and the composition.

Hmm, NO insult intended but I like to take photographs not leave it to automation
 
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#37
I’m happy with the way I work out exposure. Clearly so are you. So great.

I would though suggest you learn about histograms and the different ones for Red, Green and Blue as they’re a fundamental part of a digital photography workflow from exposure to how you process.

No thanks, I have shot everything from weddings to sports and my customers from individuals to magazines and publications are happy without my knowing, but then it is a personal choice, and I can still shoot images without metering, as we did in the days before built in meters.

I also use non AF lenses, I suppose people will say that is out too, just like vinyl is dead, oh; or is it :)

And I use THESE (Cross) to write, you know, that thing we did before texting :)


Dscn0458.jpg
 
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#39
My dad taught me to use one in the late 70's and as already pointed out you can see shutter settings for all apertures at the same time. I have a couple one of which matches yours CanNick it cost me £8 from eBay about 2 years ago, I must admit to hardly ever using them and just using sunny 16 instead , I have yet not worked out how to use view the histogram on my 1960's Cosmic 35.
 
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#40
No thanks, I have shot everything from weddings to sports and my customers from individuals to magazines and publications are happy without my knowing, but then it is a personal choice, and I can still shoot images without metering, as we did in the days before built in meters.

I also use non AF lenses, I suppose people will say that is out too, just like vinyl is dead, oh; or is it :)
Cassettes are making a comeback:)
 
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