Bet the use of this upsets some

simon ess

Just call me Roxanne.
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not sure it's much more than "useful to know something about it" with digital. But I still think in terms of zones a lot of the time.
I used to find it really useful in challenging conditions withDSLRs but modern digital cameras do now have superb dynamic range. I still think in zones all the time, especially with B+W film.
 
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Phil
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I'd never seen our forum as an extension of Care in the Community, but now you mention it....
I appreciate I'm not exactly the OP's biggest fan, but as a serious question shouldn't we have better way of dealing with genuine mental health issues than just banning people? It's 2019, surely we need a strategy?
 
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Steve
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It's aimed at the person I quoted....

He decides what to set the camera at, without the camera doing it. I'm just interested where he pulls that information from to know what to set the variables (f/stop, ss, ISO) at.
How I would do it

ISO on base setting.

F stop - depends on composition-if no near foreground open the lens up a little. Not too much though as you’ll see centre to edge sharpness fall off. That’s lens dependent though.

Obviously stop down if there’s foreground near by.

Place a filter on if you need to darken the sky a little. For my shots it’s almost exclusively a 3 stop soft. I just know this for years of shooting the types of pictures I take.

Live view on, get focus sorted and check the edges of the frame if you’re cutting off or including things you don’t intend. Pay attention to the edges. You cannot add in what you’ve cut off later but you can crop a little.

Get that histogram up on live view and adjust shutter speed accordingly so you’ve got no clipping and as little blocking as possible. With filters and modern cameras there’s a lot of scenes where the histogram won’t reach either end. Expose a little to the right making sure in final exposure none of the red, blue and greens are hit.

After Exposure, check blinkers and histogram as you might have room for one more click on the shutter wheel to get a bit more light in. Or you might have to go one down. Re-expose and check histogram. Are any of the red, green and blue histograms clipping. If so a little or a lot. Are more than one. If so you could be losing key data due to over exposure. The white histogram shows over luminance but the red, green and blues matter a lot. Over exposure can blow out say the red in a poppy field but the luminosity chart may not show any signs of over exposure - in a scene where one colour dominates its vital you check RGB charts. Check the colours - I cannot stress that enough. I mean it as you don’t want to lose detail if you can help it. In post in curves/levels you can banish any colour cast by setting white and black points on each curve to get it properly neutral - not necessary with every shot particularly if each colour histogram starts and ends in the same place but a lot of the time it’s how I process rather than chump around with contrast sliders until I’m happy. Understand histograms and curves. Once you do you’re there for landscapes.

I rarely shoot into the sun - always away from as I like the light from a rising/setting sun but not the event. Filters on the lens element can add flare if shooting into the sun so I’d take two and blend - or do a long exposure and over expose using a black case waving it over the sky part of the image - at 5 secs you’ll ghost this out and darken the top.

I do this all the time for cityscape reflections as filters add a lot of flare marks when shooting scenes with lights in them
 
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Toni
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You quoted me... I'm confused:thinking:
I think he quoted CanNik but included the quote of your post too.


I appreciate I'm not exactly the OP's biggest fan, but as a serious question shouldn't we have better way of dealing with genuine mental health issues than just banning people? It's 2019, surely we need a strategy?
It's probably a little awkward because of the physical remoteness and the lack of control over what someone with difficults does. Pretty sure no-one has time to monitor said person's posting in real time, sufficient to stem the flow of a melt-down as it happens. A possible alternative might be to have a warning in such a poster's signature area such that people ignored the 'un-necessary' parts of such a persons post and just concentrated on the meaty parts, however people are also notoriously variable in deciding which bits constitute a flap & which bits *absolutely, definitely* needed dealing with, so it would still likely end with an implosion.
 
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Lee
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How I would do it

ISO on base setting.

F stop - depends on composition-if no near foreground open the lens up a little. Not too much though as you’ll see centre to edge sharpness fall off. That’s lens dependent though.

Obviously stop down if there’s foreground near by.

Place a filter on if you need to darken the sky a little. For my shots it’s almost exclusively a 3 stop soft. I just know this for years of shooting the types of pictures I take.

Live view on, get focus sorted and check the edges of the frame if you’re cutting off or including things you don’t intend. Pay attention to the edges. You cannot add in what you’ve cut off later but you can crop a little.

Get that histogram up on live view and adjust shutter speed accordingly so you’ve got no clipping and as little blocking as possible. With filters and modern cameras there’s a lot of scenes where the histogram won’t reach either end. Expose a little to the right making sure in final exposure none of the red, blue and greens are hit.

After Exposure, check blinkers and histogram as you might have room for one more click on the shutter wheel to get a bit more light in. Or you might have to go one down. Re-expose and check histogram. Are any of the red, green and blue histograms clipping. If so a little or a lot. Are more than one. If so you could be losing key data due to over exposure. The white histogram shows over luminance but the red, green and blues matter a lot. Over exposure can blow out say the red in a poppy field but the luminosity chart may not show any signs of over exposure - in a scene where one colour dominates its vital you check RGB charts. Check the colours - I cannot stress that enough. I mean it as you don’t want to lose detail if you can help it. In post in curves/levels you can banish any colour cast by setting white and black points on each curve to get it properly neutral - not necessary with every shot particularly if each colour histogram starts and ends in the same place but a lot of the time it’s how I process rather than chump around with contrast sliders until I’m happy. Understand histograms and curves. Once you do you’re there for landscapes.

I rarely shoot into the sun - always away from as I like the light from a rising/setting sun but not the event. Filters on the lens element can add flare if shooting into the sun so I’d take two and blend - or do a long exposure and over expose using a black case waving it over the sky part of the image - at 5 secs you’ll ghost this out and darken the top.

I do this all the time for cityscape reflections as filters add a lot of flare marks when shooting scenes with lights in them
Sounds exactly the type of thing I like to do providing I've enough time!

You should copy/save that reply and post it for others if or when they need it :)
 
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Rich
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If you know you have a personality that is likely to cause offence or agitate why go out of your way to do it?
Only discussing this today at home, everyone these days has got some syndrome or other.
Someone couldn't stand on a busy train because of chronic fatigue syndrome, my legs ache at times too
Same at schools, vast majority of kids are just little buggers like they always have and will be.
It's not ADHD, too much Red Bull and up all hours looking at porn on their phones.

I have a lot of sympathy for those with genuine mental health issues.
Usually they are the people you don't hear about and who are suffering in silence.
Too many individuals have climbed on the bandwagon and use it as an excuse for poor self control.
 
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Sounds exactly the type of thing I like to do providing I've enough time!

You should copy/save that reply and post it for others if or when they need it :)
Give you a clue - make the time. If a jobs worth doing it’s worth doing well...

You can never be too early to a location - only late. If you’re a grab and go shooter (which I’m not - I find comfort in my system/ritual but I’m autistic and fanatical about detail etc)

In terms of composition-as important as the lighting etc if it’s somewhere I’ve not been I’ll arrive 4 hours early if it’s an evening location and if it’s a morning one I’ll go mid day and scout compositions-issues with the location like say water flow, man made features like bird hides, road signs, traces of building and from there judge the right lens to bring. Why lug a 70-200 if 35mm does the shot you want. A lot complain about the mass of kit and if you carry half of jessops on your back it’s going to hurt - take what you need and leave what you don’t. On an extended hiking trip in Chamonix I had to take a lot and it wasn’t so comfortable but I had 3 locations to do and was staying in a refuge.

I don’t deviate from the script and again things that throw off my plans don’t go down well (a by product of mild autism). In some places I have fall back shots to lean on but I spend masses of time planning locations and checking forecasts. That way when I’m there I can a) enjoy it b) take pictures as I’ve figured out the technical stuff and compositions before c) not waste time/money shooting in conditions that don’t work for the pictures I want to take.
 
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If you know you have a personality that is likely to cause offence or agitate why go out of your way to do it?
Because some just enjoy the tension and ensuing scrap. There have been some who would go out of their way to provoke or present their comments in a way to belittle others and de-value their work here. Just a certain kind of person is never happy unless they are making someone less.
 

StephenM

I know a Blithering Idiot
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Pretty sure no-one has time to monitor said person's posting in real time, sufficient to stem the flow of a melt-down as it happens
Some years ago, on another forum, we had a slightly volatile character, who every once in a while basically got drunk and started posting prolifically. Not very polite posts, too. The obvious solution when this was seen to be happening would have been to simply block him until he was sober, but this wasn't possible*. It just meant a lot of cleaning up had to be done the next day when he'd finally finished.

*The only person with the power to block people worked 9-5 approx (it was a magazine forum) and therefore overnight was a good time to go wild with impunity. The same with spammers...
 

AndrewFlannigan

Suspended / Banned
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If you’re a grab and go shooter
...which I am. In fact I'm the exact opposite of you in that a big part of my pleasure is spotting a picture and getting it quickly then off to see what else is there. It takes all sorts and provided we respect each others choices it just serves to make it more interesting for us all.
 
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Dave
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How I would do it

ISO on base setting.

F stop - depends on composition-if no near foreground open the lens up a little. Not too much though as you’ll see centre to edge sharpness fall off. That’s lens dependent though.

Obviously stop down if there’s foreground near by.

Place a filter on if you need to darken the sky a little. For my shots it’s almost exclusively a 3 stop soft. I just know this for years of shooting the types of pictures I take.

Live view on, get focus sorted and check the edges of the frame if you’re cutting off or including things you don’t intend. Pay attention to the edges. You cannot add in what you’ve cut off later but you can crop a little.

Get that histogram up on live view and adjust shutter speed accordingly so you’ve got no clipping and as little blocking as possible. With filters and modern cameras there’s a lot of scenes where the histogram won’t reach either end. Expose a little to the right making sure in final exposure none of the red, blue and greens are hit.

After Exposure, check blinkers and histogram as you might have room for one more click on the shutter wheel to get a bit more light in. Or you might have to go one down. Re-expose and check histogram. Are any of the red, green and blue histograms clipping. If so a little or a lot. Are more than one. If so you could be losing key data due to over exposure. The white histogram shows over luminance but the red, green and blues matter a lot. Over exposure can blow out say the red in a poppy field but the luminosity chart may not show any signs of over exposure - in a scene where one colour dominates its vital you check RGB charts. Check the colours - I cannot stress that enough. I mean it as you don’t want to lose detail if you can help it. In post in curves/levels you can banish any colour cast by setting white and black points on each curve to get it properly neutral - not necessary with every shot particularly if each colour histogram starts and ends in the same place but a lot of the time it’s how I process rather than chump around with contrast sliders until I’m happy. Understand histograms and curves. Once you do you’re there for landscapes.

I rarely shoot into the sun - always away from as I like the light from a rising/setting sun but not the event. Filters on the lens element can add flare if shooting into the sun so I’d take two and blend - or do a long exposure and over expose using a black case waving it over the sky part of the image - at 5 secs you’ll ghost this out and darken the top.

I do this all the time for cityscape reflections as filters add a lot of flare marks when shooting scenes with lights in them
Its interesting just how different we all work, I don't really do any of that as it sounds like I work much faster and hence rarely use a tripod either :)

Dave
 
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...which I am. In fact I'm the exact opposite of you in that a big part of my pleasure is spotting a picture and getting it quickly then off to see what else is there. It takes all sorts and provided we respect each others choices it just serves to make it more interesting for us all.
Beat me to it :D

Dave
 
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