Having to start over again

Dal

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2,686
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Darren
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#1
So on my recent trip to Vancouver, my camera bag was stolen along with the majority of my kit.

So having to look at buying all my gear all over again. Now the question is, do I stick with Nikon or change to Canon. I used to own the following:

Nikon D300
Sigma 10-20mm
Sigma 17-50mm f2.8
Nikon 50mm f1.8
Sigma 100-300mm f4 - Still have this.
a few speedlights still at home.
All my landscape filters and holder were stolen.

I shoot landscapes, architectural, motorsports and anything else really.
 
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16,038
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Simon
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#2
Is this being paid by you, or insurance, and if insurance is it for insured value rather than actual (i.e. D300 worth £200 but new of old cost would be 1k)?

If you have to pay then I would stick with finding the same again, unless there was something you prefer about canon. Both will be similar.

If you get a lump sum of say 2k then it opens up options to buy used as well as new and look at mirrorless? I did swap from Nikon to Fuji, but would not have swapped to any other DSLR as liked Nikon.
 
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Lindsay
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#3
I'd personally choose either to stick Nikon and go for a D500 in place of the D300, or go for eg a D750 for ff; or change systems for Fuji or Olympus. (I have D300 and D500, but also have some old Olympus M43 kit too for travelling)
 
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Dal

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2,686
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Darren
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#4
This will be paid for me once the insurance has paid me out. Will most likely be buying second hand again to get the most for my money.

Need to double check the insurance paperwork but I'm pretty sure it's what I paid for the equipment, not the current value which should help.

I haven't really been keeping up to date with the latest camera tech so wasn't sure if canon was worth the swap as it's the ideal time to make that kind of change. I do like the look of the Z6 and Z7 mirrorless camera's too.
 
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16,038
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Simon
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#5
This will be paid for me once the insurance has paid me out. Will most likely be buying second hand again to get the most for my money.

Need to double check the insurance paperwork but I'm pretty sure it's what I paid for the equipment, not the current value which should help.

I haven't really been keeping up to date with the latest camera tech so wasn't sure if canon was worth the swap as it's the ideal time to make that kind of change. I do like the look of the Z6 and Z7 mirrorless camera's too.
It always used to be in the d700 era that Nikon was better at higher iso but not sure on the case now. I am not aware of any serious differences between the 2 that matter in the real world. The d750 is a bargain imo and a huge improvement on the d300 unless you need crop. The z6 are still much more expensive by comparison and I would suggest you take a look at Fuji.
 
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GC
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#6
Stick with Nikon if it worked for you before. It's still Tier 1 gear. The D500 is a gem.

GC
 
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Jason
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#7
In your position, I'd still stick with what I'm used to.

Occasionally I have to take photos at work - the DSLR there is another brand to my own personal camera and it feels alien.

I guess if I used it more that alien feeling would vanish but it's always been the same when presented with another brand of camera to the one I'm used to. Models within the same manufacturer as my own and it's like a pair of comfortable slippers.
 
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2,686
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Darren
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#8
Thanks everyone. It's good to know Nikon and Canon are much of the same so I'll stick with Nikon then. Won't go any other brand as the lenses tend to be more expensive as not as popular so will stick with Nikon then.

Will have a look at the D500 but the D750 looks good, as does the D850. I do like the idea of changing over to the full frame sensor too.
 
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Toni
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#9
General consensus is that Canon are at least a couple of generations behind on sensor technology, but have certain unique lenses that make them favourite for certain people.

I swapped across this year from a Nikon D610 to Sony A7III, and while it was expensive, the new kit is distinctly more capable than the older stuff: better AF, better lenses, wider dynamic range, lower noise at high ISO, smaller body and *some* lenses are small too. Presently using some of my Nikon lenses adapted to the Sony.
 
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#10
If you are used to Nikon then stay with it. If you are looking for a change then go try out the opposition. It had to suit you
 
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Jason
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#15
... do like the idea of changing over to the full frame sensor too.
I just did this in the last month, it's like someone turned on the lights. All my lenses work like they used to in 35mm days and I don't find myself swearing about the stupid narrow FOV (at least not as much)
 
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Graham
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#17
I just did this in the last month, it's like someone turned on the lights. All my lenses work like they used to in 35mm days and I don't find myself swearing about the stupid narrow FOV (at least not as much)
Must admit going from FF to ASPC I have never had a problem with this, if the lens I have on has a to narrow of a point of view I just use a wider one (or zoom out if your a zoom user) and agree with Tom I have no problem in finding a wide angle that goes wide enough, that is 15mm is wide enough for me.
 
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Jason
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#18
That's great if you have the cash to (re-)buy wider lenses to suit, not everyone does - I was (and still am) using a FF film body in tandem with an APS-C digital one...
 
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#19
Would Mirrorless cope with Motor sports ? I am no expert , but was on the understanding the AF has not caught up with DSLRS yet ? Though it`s probably not far away . I am a Canon user , but if I knew what I know now , I think I would of gone Nikon . Looking at what you shoot mostly , I think full frame Nikons would be best for you . The best Camera body situation is a bit rocky at the moment . :confused:
 
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Raymond
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#20
Would Mirrorless cope with Motor sports ? I am no expert , but was on the understanding the AF has not caught up with DSLRS yet ? Though it`s probably not far away . I am a Canon user , but if I knew what I know now , I think I would of gone Nikon . Looking at what you shoot mostly , I think full frame Nikons would be best for you . The best Camera body situation is a bit rocky at the moment . :confused:
I would say the A9 equals the 1D/D5, even in motorsports.

One aspect is the 93% AF coverage means you can follow a car all over the frame without recomposing is something the DSLR cannot do.
 
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Jeff
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#21
Would Mirrorless cope with Motor sports ? I am no expert , but was on the understanding the AF has not caught up with DSLRS yet ? Though it`s probably not far away . I am a Canon user , but if I knew what I know now , I think I would of gone Nikon . Looking at what you shoot mostly , I think full frame Nikons would be best for you . The best Camera body situation is a bit rocky at the moment . :confused:
Depends really I have just changed to Olympus the upgraded firmware om1- mkii and the e-m1x are as fast if not faster than any DSLR I have used in the past . Plus a quarter of the weight
 
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2,706
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Immo
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#22
... I used to own the following:

Nikon D300
Sigma 10-20mm
Sigma 17-50mm f2.8
Nikon 50mm f1.8
Sigma 100-300mm f4 - Still have this.
...
I shoot landscapes, architectural, motorsports and anything else really.
Hi, you still have the Sigma 100-300.

For motorsports I would buy the Nikon D500 (or the D850). (I bought a (used) D800 for motorsports, because I was not satisfied with the AF performance
of my SONY A7R2. Later models might have improved a little, but all mirrorless at present have inferior AF compared to DSLRs.

I use the D800 for motorsports only. For other applications I use a Leica M9, a SONY A7R2 (and others).

You could go this way, too. A DSLR for motorsport and smaller, lighter cameras for landscape and architecture.

This is what I do ... ---
 
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2,773
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Mark
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#23
It would certainly make sense to go mirrorless if starting out from scratch today although it probably only has a fraction more longevity than dslr before computational photography takes over for good!

In the mirrorless world there are numerous options but the most fleshed out system by far also has the most advanced camera bodies and it states with ‘S’.
 
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Dal

Dal

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2,686
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Darren
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#24
Hi, you still have the Sigma 100-300.

For motorsports I would buy the Nikon D500 (or the D850). (I bought a (used) D800 for motorsports, because I was not satisfied with the AF performance
of my SONY A7R2. Later models might have improved a little, but all mirrorless at present have inferior AF compared to DSLRs.

I use the D800 for motorsports only. For other applications I use a Leica M9, a SONY A7R2 (and others).

You could go this way, too. A DSLR for motorsport and smaller, lighter cameras for landscape and architecture.

This is what I do ... ---
Yeah still have the 100-300mm f4. I will no doubt sell that soon though.

Went into my local camera shop to try the D500, wow, that camera is impressive. The iso performance is very very good and the button layout is perfect for me.

My 100-300mm f4 worked very nicely with the D500 aswell getting some great shots.

I also tried the following lenses:

16-80 kit lens - nice and light, good zoom range and good quality photos.

17-55mm f2.8 nikon lens - wow, that thing is super fast and super sharp, but it's very heavy.

70-200mm f2.8 nikon - again, super super fast, stunning quality but super heavy for the size of the lens.

I tried a D750 (no D850 there to try), and didn't like that at all compared to the D500.

The last lens I tried just to see what it was like was the sigma 150-600mm f5.6-6.3 (not the sport one) and the range and focusing speed of that lens was very very impressive actually.

So I'm thinking of the following setup at the moment:

D500
16-80 Kit lens or the 17-55mm f2.8 nikon
70-200mm f2.8 nikon
200-500mm f5.6 nikon
 
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Steven
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#25
What about looking at mirrorless? I personally switched from Sony to Fuji but both Nikon and Canon have joined the party now so you could stick with Nikon if you prefer. However, I'd say a lot depends on what you see yourself shooting, what focal lengths you need and if weight is an issue or not. Personally I think the gear is not so important these days as most folk would be hard pressed to tell the difference between images of the same scene etc shot on different marques. I took some great images at F1 on my Fuji X-T2, 50-140mm f/2.8 and 1.4x T/C. I also love the Fuji X-H1 for landscapes and portraits. From your post I'd say that Fuji should be something to look at, but in the end its personal preference. Maybe hire different kit and see how they all feel to you and your style of working.
 
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Chris
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#26
I’m pretty much in the same boat aft r a serious fire two weeks ago that destroyed my man cave. All my computer, camera and drone kit destroyed amongst 30 years worth of various other kit. Thankfully I have new for old so many decisions what to replace and what with.
 
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Immo
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#27
Yeah still have the 100-300mm f4. I will no doubt sell that soon though. ...

So I'm thinking of the following setup at the moment:

D500
16-80 Kit lens or the 17-55mm f2.8 nikon
70-200mm f2.8 nikon
200-500mm f5.6 nikon
Hi, a nice comprehensive kit you worked out.

You might also consider the Nikon 4/70-200 (I have), which performs perfectly, and is light. Good for moving about around a race-track (behind the fence ( ;)) )...
 
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#28
I’m pretty much in the same boat aft r a serious fire two weeks ago that destroyed my man cave. All my computer, camera and drone kit destroyed amongst 30 years worth of various other kit. Thankfully I have new for old so many decisions what to replace and what with.
Oh how devastating. So sorry to hear that.
 
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#31
This will be paid for me once the insurance has paid me out. Will most likely be buying second hand again to get the most for my money.

Need to double check the insurance paperwork but I'm pretty sure it's what I paid for the equipment, not the current value which should help.
FWIW when we were burgled years ago the loss adjuster was very keen on replacing goods not supplying money. A large CD collection was compensated with HMV vouchers but the electronics were like for like replacements with the option to add in more money for something better. IIRC they didn't give us any actual cash because it is so open to fraud and overclaiming.

My friend who dropped her insured Sony DSLR received a Nikon replacement because the Sony was discontinued. She didn't even get to choose what she got, they just said it was comparable on features and price :eek: Luckily she only had the kit lens and no brand loyalty.

I'd definitely find out how the company are planning on settling the claim then make decisions based on that.
 
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Steven
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#32
If you do your research you will find that Canon joined the mirrorless party back in 2012 with the EOS M.
Hi

I wasn't saying anything about when they brought out their first mirrorless, more about the fact that its only recently they have introduced what many would consider a 'Pro' mirrorless system, likewise Nikon. If one wants to pedantic the first mirrorless camera commercially marketed was the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1, released in Japan in October 2008.
 
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Chris
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#35
Great news, I was told I will probably get an offer of replacement or a cash settlement. I would rather have the cash too then if can slim down and choose better new kit.
 
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Name
B
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#36
I tend to disagree with most here, and not say you should stick with Nikon. Instead, I suggest you go out to a shop and try the cameras in your hands. Maybe ask around to find people in your area with cameras you are interested in or second hand sellers. Just try out and see how they feel. Who knows, maybe you like a canon more than a nikon, or maybe you would prefer a smaller olympus or fuji. Maybe mirrorless over DSLR. The only way to find out is to try them yourself in real.
 
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#37
D500
16-80 Kit lens or the 17-55mm f2.8 nikon
70-200mm f2.8 nikon
200-500mm f5.6 nikon
Sorry about the loss you your gear. I have been in a similar situation about 10 years ago and similar stuff stolen. My bag got stolen from my home though. :(

Nikon D300
Sigma 10-20mm
Nikon 16-85mm
Nikon 50mm f1.8
Nikon 70-300mm
And a few other bits and pieces. :(

I wasn't insured, :( and the Sigma 10-20mm wasn't mine. :eek: The only silver lining on the whole thing was that I got a D300S as a replacement eventually. :)

The D500 is an improvement over the D300 in every way, :) but at the same time having the familiarity of a similar design and layout as you no doubt found out when you tried it out. You will love it if/when you get it. :D

I'm sure you have thought of this, but don't forget to budget for memory cards. You don't need fast cards, particularly for landscapes, but a fast card will give you a larger buffer depth for motorsports. That could be either XQD or SD UHSII. Sony have promised a firmware update at some point to allow the D500 to use the newer CFExpress cards. Something to keep an eye out for should you get the D500 as it may give more card options in the future. If you already have some SD cards you could test what buffer depth you get with the cards you have.

I have the 16-80mm on my D500 most of the time, and found it a nice improvement over the 16-85mm, and is the best combination of size, weight, range and cost imho. Never used the 17-55mm. I have the Sigma 10-20mm f3.5, and hardly use it because the 16-80mm is wide enough most of the time. Only you will know how much you used the 10-20mm in the past.

The only plus side of a loss like this is getting newer replacements, and even better if you have the inurance to pay for it. :oops: :$ ;) :LOL:
 
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