Large Format photography group - From "zero to hero!"

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What I'm really looking for, folks, is advice to get me going a bit, to move off the zero button and bit towards the hero. Please send help!

Thanks, Chris
Chris, have you thought of practicing your LF skills at home ? You can learn a lot doing still life or floral studies - if you can get the order of the steps right at home then you’re more likely to get them right out of doors . You can create your own studio with just a dark sheet for a background and one or two anglepoise lamps. Stick with the Fomapan until you’re more confident although you will have some very long exposures for indoor work.

I wasted too much money shooting LF colour before I was ready. I still make a lot of mistakes after about 130 LF shots in 18 months, but on the other hand I feel pleased with a small number of shots that worked well. Last month two DDS with exposed Portra fell into a stream because I hadn’t zipped up my pack properly.
 

sirch

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Please send help!
What do you "do" with your photos Chris? Print? Publish? Show at a club?

We are all different but I find I need a purpose, if I am not shooting with an end in mind I find it hard to get motivated. About 1 in 1000 photos I shoot (across all formats including digital) I get printed and put on the wall and I have a couple of on-going projects which may or may not end up as books but that is the long term intention. Sometimes I do shoot stuff just for the sake of "playing with the toys" but I find those are the least successful however I am OK with that because the purpose was to mess around with the gear.

How about shooting all next year's FPOTY on LF? The themes will be out soon so you can start thinking and planning
 

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Chris, have you thought of practicing your LF skills at home ? You can learn a lot doing still life or floral studies - if you can get the order of the steps right at home then you’re more likely to get them right out of doors . You can create your own studio with just a dark sheet for a background and one or two anglepoise lamps. Stick with the Fomapan until you’re more confident although you will have some very long exposures for indoor work.
I did try this earlier in the year, I think it must have been the January "Little and large" theme. I couldn't see anything on the GGS! I think two things went wrong, or maybe three... I didn't realise how much forward extension you need for closeups (confirmed yesterday that putting the front standard on the front peg gives a focus distance of around 2 feet), so probably everything was completely out of focus. I also didn't put any additional ligting on the subject. And I don't think I had my dark cloth at that point, so was probably using something completely inadequate.

I think what puts me off is anticipated scathing remarks from the OH, if I start hanging black cloths, moving furniture etc. I tend to do my indoor stuff when she's gone out for a walk.

Nevertheless, this is a good idea, thanks.
 

ChrisR

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What do you "do" with your photos Chris? Print? Publish? Show at a club?

We are all different but I find I need a purpose, if I am not shooting with an end in mind I find it hard to get motivated. About 1 in 1000 photos I shoot (across all formats including digital) I get printed and put on the wall and I have a couple of on-going projects which may or may not end up as books but that is the long term intention. Sometimes I do shoot stuff just for the sake of "playing with the toys" but I find those are the least successful however I am OK with that because the purpose was to mess around with the gear.

How about shooting all next year's FPOTY on LF? The themes will be out soon so you can start thinking and planning
I haven't found it hard to get motivated with 135, as I just enjoy the whole process. TBH I don't do much with my photos; I do print some occasionally, but the last one hanging on the wall in my den is the triptych FPOTY entry. FPOTY is the most consistent way my images get any exposure; I keep thinking I'll add some to the "Show us yer..." thread (or make another thread in the Pics from Film section), but something always seems to intervene (in the background, I'm working up to a full conversion from Aperture to Capture One Pro, which has taken a lot of time... plus, I seem to have become obsessed with twitter in these days of political upheaval, which is probably where most of the useful time goes).

I've got a vague plan to make a calendar with images from the grandkids and some of the holidays we've been on this year, too.

None of this would be appropriate for LF yet, as far as I can see. I have to get through a lot of sheer practice before I can expect anything worth hanging on the wall. I'll definitely stick with the Fomapan just now. But I haven't scanned the two images I took earlier in the year (have to dig out the V500, and scan each of them twice and then stitch), nor devved the two images I took a few days ago (tank devving, which I don't usually do). I wanted to use that Shrewsbury company we found earlier, only to discover they have stopped doing mail order work; shame as their prices were really good and about what's reasonable given a high expectation of mistakes.
 

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Here's my report on my first visit to a camera club....

The background to the invitation was simply that I got into conversation with the programme secretary when he and a number of other members came to the Foredown Tower to view the camera obscura (I'm one of the demonstrators). On discovering that I was interested in photography, and preferred to use a large format camera, he invited me to give a talk on large format photography. Which is why I was there.

The notes for the talk, the illustrations, and the projected images can all be viewed via this link.

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AvzjN1vsy206gsFiJsfWhCFNPk2PZA?e=83UxYW

The alternative to giving a link would be to copy in the text (easy) and then add 31 illustrations and 16 further photographs, which would rather swamp this thread! So apologies for that.

On arrival, suitably early, I unpacked and the 20 or so A3 prints I'd brought were displayed in one of the room corners, where they could be viewed as people came in, or indeed during the break.

The title of the talk as I discovered when I was given a copy of this year's programme (the arrangement having been made the year before) was "The World of Large Format Cameras" which is why I started the talk with a reference to a Christmas quiz in Popular Photography magazine from the mid 1960s. "What's the difference between painters and photographers?". They thought for a few moments, and then I gave the answer: "Two painters can meet without talking about brushes". The relevance to the talk title was obvious.

The question "how many have used film" resulted in a near 100% raising of hands, which made life easier as I could at least assume that they knew what you could expect from film - at least in smaller sizes.

I followed the talk outline, with only a few small deviations - a few minor points left out, and a few things added, according to the interest shown. I managed to get through all the topics save the last on after exposure before the tea break. In the last few minutes I suggested that someone might like to try taking a portrait using a large format camera. The programme secretary volunteered, and after the break decided on as much of a group photo as could be fitted in with a standard lens on a 5x7 camera.

The tea break went well, in that I was expected to queue jump to get my tea first. The conversation mainly covered metering, and I think I may have disappointed (and certainly occasioned surprise) when I said that I didn't use the Zone System.

After the break, and the photo, there was just time to use the projector to show another 16 photos which hadn't been brought as prints before it was time to start packing away.

I found it interesting that in conversation with a lady with an American accent that she referred to a photographer who went round the American west with a large format camera, but she couldn't recall the name. I assumed she meant Carlton Watkins, and supplied the name and some details, adding that he'd covered the same ground as Ansel Adams but rather earlier. At which point, she said that Ansel Adams was the name she couldn't recall. Edward Weston's name at least was familiar, so all in all a few surprises for me.

I did subsequently receive an email thanking me, and saying that there had been positive feedback on the evening - but I'm inclined to think "they would say that, wouldn't they".

If anyone has looked through the illustrations, they may have seen a large format TLR - a 10x8 Gowlandflex that stood 3 feet high, and could only be carried on a neckstrap by a very tall photographer :).
 
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Asha

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Here's my report on my first visit to a camera club....

The background to the invitation was simply that I got into conversation with the programme secretary when he and a number of other members came to the Foredown Tower to view the camera obscura (I'm one of the demonstrators). On discovering that I was interested in photography, and preferred to use a large format camera, he invited me to give a talk on large format photography. Which is why I was there.

The notes for the talk, the illustrations, and the projected images can all be viewed via this link.

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AvzjN1vsy206gsFiJsfWhCFNPk2PZA?e=83UxYW

The alternative to giving a link would be to copy in the text (easy) and then add 31 illustration and 16 further photographs, which would rather swamp this thread! So apologies for that.

On arrival, suitably early, I unpacked and the 20 or so A3 prints I'd brought were displayed in one of the room corners, where they could be viewed as people came in, or indeed during the break.

The title of the talk as I discovered when I was given a copy of this year's programme (the arrangement having been made the year before) was "The World of Large Format Cameras" which is why I started the talk with a reference to a Christmas quiz in Popular Photography magazine from the mid 1960s. "What's the difference between painters and photographers?". They thought for a few moments, and then I gave the answer: "Two painters can meet without talking about brushes". The relevance to the talk title was obvious.

The question "how many have used film" resulted in a near 100% raising of hands, which made life easier as I could at least assume that they knew what you could expect from film - at least in smaller sizes.

I followed the talk outline, with only a few small deviations - a few minor points left out, and a few things added, according to the interest shown. I managed to get through all the topics save the last on after exposure before the tea break. In the last few minutes I suggested that someone might like to try taking a portrait using a large format camera. The programme secretary volunteered, and after the break decided on as much of a group photo as could be fitted in with a standard lens on a 5x7 camera.

The tea break went well, in that I was expected to queue jump to get my tea first. The conversation mainly covered metering, and I think I may have disappointed (and certainly occasioned surprise) when I said that I didn't use the Zone System.

After the break, and the photo, there was just time to use the projector to show another 16 photos which hadn't been brought as prints before it was time to start packing away.

I found it interesting that in conversation with a lady with an American accent that she referred to a photographer who went round the American west with a large format camera, but she couldn't recall the name. I assumed she meant Carlton Watkins, and supplied the name and some details, adding that he's covered the same ground as Ansel Adams but rather earlier. At which point, she said that Ansel Adams was the name she couldn't recall. Edward Weston's name at least was familiar, so all in all a few surprises for me.

I did subsequently receive an email thanking me, and saying that there had been positive feedback on the evening - but I'm inclined to think "they would say that, wouldn't they".

If anyone has looked through the illustrations, they may have seen a large format TLR - a 10x8 Gowlandflex that stood 3 feet high, and could only be carried on a neckstrap by a very tall photographer :).
Very well done!

An achievement to be proud of Stephen :clap:
 
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The tea break went well, in that I was expected to queue jump to get my tea first.
Highlight of the evening. What about biscuits?
 
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There are days...

Was going to do some close work so dug out my new (to me Cambo) spent half an hour looking for my lens spanner. The only one I could find is copal 0 fine I thought I'll stick on the 150 ahah, no... Cambo lens board is copal 1. And I haven't got round to making an linohf adaptor for the Cambo to save swapping lens boards...


So now, grab the rb and shoot what I was going to or start making the adapter board?
 
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Definitely depends on the weather, since you have to make use of whatever light there is at this time. Unless you're shooting with lights, of course.
Going to shoot in the shed/studio/shop so light is less of an issue. And it's going to be a bit nippy what ever I do!
 
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It's the Ffordes end of season event tonight, with talks by

First up is Stephen Cosh, a beautiful landscape & Street Photographer from Ayr who uses a mix of film and digital - https://www.stephencosh.co.uk/.

We then Welcome Canon Pro Ambassador Rod Fountain, he has been to the highlands on many occasions but not for your normal landscape & wildlife shoots. He is an ex Top-Gear location Photographer and brings something new to the Ffordes talk night that we haven’t seen before.


There are stands by several equipment suppliers as well, but I'll probably be avoiding the one who suggested that LF wasn't worth all the effort nowadays. :eek::eek::eek:

20181122_125202_resized_1-tp.jpg
 

Andysnap

<span class="poty">POTY (Film) 2015</span>
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Apart from the most beautiful noise in cameradom, the almost sublime clockwork sound of a Voightlander Bessamatic shutter, utter bliss.;)
 

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Took my Chroma out again on Sunday, to try for some shots for this month's FPOTY. I'd loaded up 4 sheets of Foma 100, having ruined one by jamming it up while loading. That is a very bright green on the back of Foma sheets!

I'm having real trouble getting the film holder properly located in the camera. Never quite sure that it's in the right place. Anyway, first shot in quite nice conditions with some reasonable light on the further subject... and I couldn't get the dark slide back in. Tried for ages, and eventually pulled the film holder out to discover most of a sheet stuck out of the bottom! Somehow the dark slide must have caught the top of the sheet and forced it down and out of the holder. :(

I'm slightly worried that the later shots might have been "focused" without the GGS being against the back of the camera, too; I always have trouble with those metal flap thingies.
 
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Took my Chroma out again on Sunday, to try for some shots for this month's FPOTY. I'd loaded up 4 sheets of Foma 100, having ruined one by jamming it up while loading. That is a very bright green on the back of Foma sheets!

I'm having real trouble getting the film holder properly located in the camera. Never quite sure that it's in the right place. Anyway, first shot in quite nice conditions with some reasonable light on the further subject... and I couldn't get the dark slide back in. Tried for ages, and eventually pulled the film holder out to discover most of a sheet stuck out of the bottom! Somehow the dark slide must have caught the top of the sheet and forced it down and out of the holder. :(

I'm slightly worried that the later shots might have been "focused" without the GGS being against the back of the camera, too; I always have trouble with those metal flap thingies.
Sorry you're having such difficulties with your Chroma Chris. Are the metal Graflok plates too loose so they drop down in the way of the film holder?
 

ChrisR

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Sorry you're having such difficulties with your Chroma Chris. Are the metal Graflok plates too loose so they drop down in the way of the film holder?
Sometimes they drop down, sometimes I have trouble getting them out! I think it's partly having a reduced functionality right hand, so I'd be pulling the right hand plate out holding it between my forefinger and middle finger, which is tricky.

But this is all mostly down to lack of practice. I'm sure things will improve as I use it more. It seemed worth documenting my trials a bit, even if only because some folk coming after might feel a kindred spirit if they have troubles. And hopefully I can actually show y'all a completed successful image soon. But before that (though maybe much before that) I have to dev the 5 exposed sheets I currently have!
 
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Sometimes they drop down, sometimes I have trouble getting them out! I think it's partly having a reduced functionality right hand, so I'd be pulling the right hand plate out holding it between my forefinger and middle finger, which is tricky.

But this is all mostly down to lack of practice. I'm sure things will improve as I use it more. It seemed worth documenting my trials a bit, even if only because some folk coming after might feel a kindred spirit if they have troubles. And hopefully I can actually show y'all a completed successful image soon. But before that (though maybe much before that) I have to dev the 5 exposed sheets I currently have!
Ah ok, I can understand it being a bit more fiddly then. Whilst you're not exactly enjoying the use fully, it's useful getting feedback for future designs though so please do keep sharing. Cheers
 

ChrisR

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@ChrisR, The taco method is where you use a normal paterson tank that's tall enough to take two 135 reels and then you need as many (weak) elastic bands as sheets you want to develop (up to 5 at a push in my experience). take the sheet of film, curl the long edge around to meet the parallel long edge and put a band round it. you can slot 4-5 of these into the paterson tank...
I had 5 sheets and decided to try getting them all in rather than doing 2 separate dev sessions. I also tried leaving the central post in place while putting the tacos in, this time; much easier. First off I got one taco wrapped round the central post, but I managed to get that off and back in place, or so I thought.

I used the MDC app... I had a feeling that last time I used it, it had a phase for the pre-soak for the ant-halation layer, but that didn't come up this time. Maybe I missed telling it that it was sheet film. I did a pre-soak, anyway. Lovely bright green comes out!

In another post we were talking about re-using the developer for a 135 film, if there were fewer sheets in the tank. By my calculations, one sheet uses up about 4 ml of HC 110, and 800 ml of mix uses 25 ml at HC 110 B, so there wouldn't be much left over anyway. There was some discussion on whether the dev mix would come out green; I must have done a reasonable pre-soak as the waste dev mix was pretty yellow, only lightly tinged with green.

Annoyingly, when I got the lid off I found that I'd managed to get one taco inside another one. There was anti-halation still on parts of both, so I gave them another soak. One has a corner that has no development at all, but the other looks like it might possibly be OK. One of the other sheets has a fairly massive light leak, probably from the film holder being wrongly placed, but 2 or maybe 3 sheets look like they just might be OK.

I think I'll make a rule that 4 tacos is the maximum, in future.
 

Asha

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2 or maybe 3 sheets look like they just might be OK.
That sounds quite promising,(y) nonetheless:

I think I'll make a rule that 4 tacos is the maximum, in future.
Perhaps 1 sheet at a time would be a better option.

It can't be fouled up by other sheets.

If you stuff the development ( timing, solution error etc etc) , you will only have lost one frame.

As with everything LF .....Slower and mathodical is always the way to progress.
 

ChrisR

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Probably good advice, @Asha... which I'm probably going to ignore, as I can only dev when the OH is out; I doubt I'd have got 2 complete sessions today, let alone 5. Plus it's either dump 800 ml of mix each time (25 ml of HC 110 each time) or work out the increased dev times. I have to take a bit of a risk to get some results (two of the sheets, the out of focus ones have been sat around since last month, waiting for a dev opportunity).
 
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Probably good advice, @Asha... which I'm probably going to ignore, as I can only dev when the OH is out; I doubt I'd have got 2 complete sessions today, let alone 5. Plus it's either dump 800 ml of mix each time (25 ml of HC 110 each time) or work out the increased dev times. I have to take a bit of a risk to get some results (two of the sheets, the out of focus ones have been sat around since last month, waiting for a dev opportunity).
Chris, I'm wondering if it is maybe appropriate to try commercial processing as per your post the other day in the developing thread? That might help in removing doubt on tacos and such like, allowing you to concentrate on the shooting side of things.

I'm lucky to be able to please myself on b&w processing as far as convenience is concerned, so it's something I actually look forward to. I was uncomfortable with it when I restarted after 10 years or so and it kind of spoiled the enjoyment, so I can understand where you are now and that's why commercial processing might help.
 

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Chris, I'm wondering if it is maybe appropriate to try commercial processing as per your post the other day in the developing thread? That might help in removing doubt on tacos and such like, allowing you to concentrate on the shooting side of things.

I'm lucky to be able to please myself on b&w processing as far as convenience is concerned, so it's something I actually look forward to. I was uncomfortable with it when I restarted after 10 years or so and it kind of spoiled the enjoyment, so I can understand where you are now and that's why commercial processing might help.
Yes I thought quite hard about getting these shots done by a lab, but it would have cost up to £20 procss-only and I was rather worried that they might all be rubbish. In case I didn't make it clear above, I quite enjoyed the session, apart from the 2-in-1 discovery, and felt quite a sense of elation on realising there could well be something useful there. I haven't scanned them yet, though (on a V500 which is another pain as it's 2 scans and a stitch for each sheet!). I rather suspect that for 2 sheets I won't even bother to save the scans as I suspect they are so OOF.

I think I need to continue to shoot, but I'll try to restrict myself to 4 sheets at a time. After Christmas and various other things that are going on I hope it'll be easier to organise a dev session.
 
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Yes I thought quite hard about getting these shots done by a lab, but it would have cost up to £20 procss-only and I was rather worried that they might all be rubbish. In case I didn't make it clear above, I quite enjoyed the session, apart from the 2-in-1 discovery, and felt quite a sense of elation on realising there could well be something useful there. I haven't scanned them yet, though (on a V500 which is another pain as it's 2 scans and a stitch for each sheet!). I rather suspect that for 2 sheets I won't even bother to save the scans as I suspect they are so OOF.

I think I need to continue to shoot, but I'll try to restrict myself to 4 sheets at a time. After Christmas and various other things that are going on I hope it'll be easier to organise a dev session.
I've just came across this article on another site, and it's basically a much cheaper variation on the Paterson Orbital idea, but involves getting more hands on. Not sure if it's a suitable thing for you to try, though?
 

Asha

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I've just came across this article on another site, and it's basically a much cheaper variation on the Paterson Orbital idea, but involves getting more hands on. Not sure if it's a suitable thing for you to try, though?
If it helps then dish developing film in complete darkness is actually not as hard as one may imagine.

Out of curiosity, in my "new" darkroom I have already developed 4x5 film in trays as well as loading film holders ( main reason being that 10x8 is going to be a tight squeeze in my changing tent)

Unlike mentioned in the linked article, obtain 3 trays, one for each chemical, dev, stop, fixer.

Keeping the dry and wet sides of the process seperate, lay out the 3 trays on a suitable surface in order of process, dev, stop etc and add chems

On a seperate surface ( table) away from the wet stuff but close enough to not require wandering around in the dark, place your film holder with exposed film.

Ensure there are no other obstacles to get in the way of what you need to lay your hands on!!

Mobile fone timer set to 6 mins 15 seconds

COMPLETE DARKNESS!

Timer activated, fone placed in pocket to black out the screen illumination!

Counting 20 seconds / elephants out loud, the film removed from holder and placed in dev tray at the count of 20


Gentle rocking of tray for agitation up until ring tone from fone heard which related to 5 mins 55 secs of development.

Film removed ( by hand) from dev, excess solution allowed to drip off for a few seconds, thus bringing total dev time to the required 6 minutes.

Film placed in stop solution and agitated for 10 seconds or so.

Removed, allowed to drip for a few secs then placed in fixer.

Agitated for a few minutes, judged simply by counting elephants at which point safe enough to turn on the lights and continue fixing upto the usual 6 minute duration that I usually give film.

Wash film and hey presto, a negative with an image ready to be hung up to dry

This is based on developing just one sheet at a time which means using rawlplugs would be unnecessary.
 

Asha

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I will add that for those who can't construct or simply don't want a darkroom environment then the Patterson Orbital Processor is imo the best daylight tank developing method available for sheet film.

Such a shame that they are no longer produced although I came across a seller recently who eviently had several available to sell!
 
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I will add that for those who can't construct or simply don't want a darkroom environment then the Patterson Orbital Processor is imo the best daylight tank developing method available for sheet film.

Such a shame that they are no longer produced although I came across a seller recently who eviently had several available to sell!
And yet, and yet ......... If Paterson no longer really exist, what would stop someone with a 3D printer trying to produce one now? :thinking: Genuine question, as I know absolutely nothing about 3D printing!
 
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Paterson still exist (or have been recreated) as part of some UK manufacturer called TWP Group, and manufacture Paterson darkroom kit in the UK...

https://www.patersonphotographic.com/

It takes a bit more than owning a 3D printer to produce something. You need 3D design skills for a start, as well as a suitable printer (ie, big enough in this case, and with a suitable manufacturing technology). 3D printing can also be quite slow, potentially somewhat expensive, and can be messy depending on the technology. For a hobbyist with suitable skill and equipment, it might be feasible to make one, but manufacturing them for sale might not be viable - I suspect the time to manufacture would push the price up.
 
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Paterson still exist (or have been recreated) as part of some UK manufacturer called TWP Group, and manufacture Paterson darkroom kit in the UK...

https://www.patersonphotographic.com/

It takes a bit more than owning a 3D printer to produce something. You need 3D design skills for a start, as well as a suitable printer (ie, big enough in this case, and with a suitable manufacturing technology). 3D printing can also be quite slow, potentially somewhat expensive, and can be messy depending on the technology. For a hobbyist with suitable skill and equipment, it might be feasible to make one, but manufacturing them for sale might not be viable - I suspect the time to manufacture would push the price up.
Ah well, it was only a thought! (y)
 
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Ah well, it was only a thought! (y)
The main thing with 3D printers at present is that they're good for one-offs and small batches but aren't conducive to mass manufacture. There's a threshold where the cost of getting tooling made for moulding (expensive) results in lower cost per part and much faster manufacture.
 
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The main thing with 3D printers at present is that they're good for one-offs and small batches but aren't conducive to mass manufacture. There's a threshold where the cost of getting tooling made for moulding (expensive) results in lower cost per part and much faster manufacture.
This ^

I'm currently 3D printing more of my Chroma camera major components using two printers running pretty much 24x7. This is ok for smaller volume work but there's no way it would be either time or cost effective for larger volumes like the ChromaGraphica dry plate holders. For those we're working with a Chinese moulding company, the same ones who manufacture the Stearman SP-445 as well as, funnily enough, his new multi-format SP-8x10 dev tray ;0)

https://shop.stearmanpress.com/blogs/news/sp-8x10-test-photos-and-video

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1273/8933/files/SP-8x10_user_s_guide.pdf?1685
 
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Hello Everyone,

Hope I'm in the right place for this query.

I own a rather old MPP 5x4 LF camera. It is a bit tired,(like me) and it was inherited from a relative who used it professionally in St Andrews in the '40s and '50s. With it came three plate holders, again a bit tired but cleaning up Ok, I want to try out some sheet film in the camera but want to avoid any expenditure until the camera has proved itself.

My query is, any suggestions as to modifying the holders for film? Additionally, are all film holders the same or do I have to specifically buy MPP film holders?

If anybody has any useful info regarding Large Format (Apart from - don't!) and things to avoid, I would appreciate any comments. I'm regularly using both medium format and 35mm monochrome so film is not unfamiliar to me, just large format.

Thanks,
Ken
 
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Hello Everyone,

Hope I'm in the right place for this query.

I own a rather old MPP 5x4 LF camera. It is a bit tired,(like me) and it was inherited from a relative who used it professionally in St Andrews in the '40s and '50s. With it came three plate holders, again a bit tired but cleaning up Ok, I want to try out some sheet film in the camera but want to avoid any expenditure until the camera has proved itself.

My query is, any suggestions as to modifying the holders for film? Additionally, are all film holders the same or do I have to specifically buy MPP film holders?

If anybody has any useful info regarding Large Format (Apart from - don't!) and things to avoid, I would appreciate any comments. I'm regularly using both medium format and 35mm monochrome so film is not unfamiliar to me, just large format.

Thanks,
Ken
I believe the only major difference between plate holders & film holders in merely the thickness of the slot for loading. The important distance is that of the TOP surface which is the photoreceptive bit. This must fall as precisely as possible in the same plane the ground side of the glass occupies during focusing (make sure the matt side of the ground glass is towards the lens). Fitting a spacer marginally thinner than the glass plates the holders are designed for should allow film to be added above the spacer - as it's behind the sensitive layer the material of the spacer is not critical as long as it stays flat, it may be possible to try it out with a card spacer, but plastic, plywood or similar is a better long term solution.

Plate holders may not have the clip at the end that film holders have & the edge grooves probably wont be quite as good but you should be able to get it working at least, even if you end up having to tape film to your spacers before use (not easy in a changing bag!)
 
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Woodsy

Woodsy

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Hi Ken, and welcome!

As Mike says above, adding a spacer nearly as thick as the plate thickness would be a good shout to start with.

With the exception of something being impossible, most folk in here would definitely fall on the side of 'Do!' rather than 'don't' :)

Given the recent addition to the Chroma lineup, perhaps @stevelmx5 has some thoughts on this?
 
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Thanks Guys,

I really fancy doing this. My digital photography was becoming a bit jaded (too much worrying about club photography and judges - and I'm a judge too!) so I decided it was time to put some fun into what I was doing. Craig Prentis on YouTube was wandering about with his dog taking images and it seemed so relaxed. So, why don't I do that too. I live in Aberdeenshire, so we are not short of stuff to take. I just wanted to get the kit sorted so disappointments were kept to a minimum. Craig used Fomapan 100 so I though I would try it. The main problem was the condition of the kit. I'll keep you posted.

Regards
Ken
 
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