memory card question

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#1
Just ordered a Sandisk CF card 64GB 160MB/s For my Nikon D810 which is a (36.3MP) camera
Shooting RAW 14 bit uncompressed in large

how many shots can I expect to get?
 
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Redsnappa
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#2
It is impossible to get an 100% accurate figure as pictures taken in in different lighting will produces RAW files of different size.
 
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#4
Thank you both for the replies. I ask because this year my wife and I have decided and booked to go to Japan. Apart from seeing as much as possible photos are a great reminder.
On our previous trip to China I took my Nikon D300 and very nearly run out of cards, so this time I want to have more than enough card space with the 32gb cards and others. I have enough SD cards so no prob there
 
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Nod

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#5
Stick a card in and note how many shots it thinks will fit. Take 100 shots and see how many it thinks will fit now. Now you'll know how many projected shots 100 real shots use.
As for how many cards to take; make a rough calculation based on the above method to see how many cards you think you might need and take 1/2 as many again, just in case. OR, research the cost of cards there and just buy more when you only have a couple of empties left - memory is so cheap these days (compared to a few years ago).
 
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#6
try google for your answer there are tables showing how many per gb you get from
different mp camera's
 

StewartR

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#8
Hmmm... I wonder whether it answers this question in the camera's user manual. Oh look, there it is! Page 489. It says typically 199 images on a 16GB card, so 4 times that which is 796 on a 64GB card.
 
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#9
Hmmm... I wonder whether it answers this question in the camera's user manual. Oh look, there it is! Page 489. It says typically 199 images on a 16GB card, so 4 times that which is 796 on a 64GB card.
Always a good place to look

It is impossible to get an 100% accurate figure as pictures taken in in different lighting will produces RAW files of different size.
That’s very true. Nikon are quite conservative with their figures. They usually state a worst case figure rather than an average of the possible file size range that will occur.
 
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#11
Thank you both for the replies. I ask because this year my wife and I have decided and booked to go to Japan. Apart from seeing as much as possible photos are a great reminder.
On our previous trip to China I took my Nikon D300 and very nearly run out of cards, so this time I want to have more than enough card space with the 32gb cards and others. I have enough SD cards so no prob there

What ever you calculate you need I would still go with at least 3-4 cards more than I need as you never know if you lose one, gets damaged or fails !
 
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#12
I would expect memory cards to be cheap in Japan. So I'd buy as and when I need them locally. Unless you go off a beaten track somewhere remote.
 
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#14

AS you can see I think I now have plenty of memory cards 2 new 64gb ones and the others I already had. Also the camcorder has a 32gb memory built in
Nikon D810 has 2 slots so Raw in first with CF card and second slot the SD card as backup. that is how I have it set up

So thanks for the advice again
 
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#15
Unfortunately OP you're overlooking or ignoring the issue of having all your eggs in one basket. Loss of a full 64gb card with memories from a trip of a life-time would be a disaster. When I've done such trips my strategy is to spread the risk of loss by using a high number of low capacity cards and to take a portable back up device and ensure every day's shots are also backed up to the cloud. Overkill? Yes, but works for me.
 
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#16
John

I understand where you are coming from but first of all I don't have a portable backup device .Second it only adds weight and space is limited in my camera bag which i can take in the aircraft cabin. By the time I put in my Nikon D810 and camcorder with charger, ( I can have one charger to do both), my camcorder and Nikon 24-70mm lens- 50mm lens and 70-200mm lens there is just enough in the small pockets for all the batteries .

Don't forget my Nikon D810 has 2 slots CF and SD and it records to both at the same time , so if one fails the other shouldn't

the overall weight is enough to lug around and not had any problems so far on all the cruises we have been on. I do take your point about a portable back up device but that would also need a charger etc .
 
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#17
Unfortunately OP you're overlooking or ignoring the issue of having all your eggs in one basket. Loss of a full 64gb card with memories from a trip of a life-time would be a disaster. When I've done such trips my strategy is to spread the risk of loss by using a high number of low capacity cards and to take a portable back up device and ensure every day's shots are also backed up to the cloud. Overkill? Yes, but works for me.
If you split one 64gb card into four 16gb cards, you've just multiplied the chances of losing a quarter of your images by four, not to mention the additional remove/replace actions that are claimed to increase risk. Plus you've multiplied the risk of loss or physical damage to cards that are the most common reason for lost images.

I'm not one of the doom sayers. Of all the things that can go wrong, memory card failure is so far down the list that IMHO it's just not worth fretting over. Nothing is 100% safe, buy good cards, look after them, back them up if needs be, and stop worrying.

Edit: also, the most common electronic failure of memory cards is for the micro-controller to go down - in which case the images are still intact, but you just can't access them. Recovery software like Recuva (free) and others can get them back in a few minutes though, and it's tricks like that which explain the very high rate of success claimed by commercial recovery firms, like over 90%. Recuva will also get back accidentally deleted images, because the images are still there until over-written. Deleting images or reformatting a card doesn't actually erase anything - it's just telling the controller that those cells are now available for re-writing. In other words, check your LCD and the moment you notice a problem, stop shooting to that card and there's a very good chance all will be well.
Flash memory is also pretty robust. Treading on a card is not a good idea, but they frequently survive a trip through the washing machine and I just read a story about a USB stick swallowed by a seal and found in a pile of frozen poo a year later with images and video intact https://petapixel.com/2019/02/07/usb-stick-found-inside-seal-poo-with-photos-intact/

Recuva https://recuva.en.softonic.com/download
 
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#18
All I can say is I have been using Sandisk memory cards for well over 12 years and never had one fail on me yet. That is even having taken many thousands of photos let alone all the video work using them.
 
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#19
If you think of all the reasons why an image doesn't make it as a 'keeper' then human error is far and away the number one issue, plus circumstances that are beyond our control like the weather or an elusive or difficult subject that won't cooperate.

You need a camera to hand, not left at home or in the car or forgotten, and it needs to have a memory card actually inside (we've all forgotten that). Then you need to get a good subject in front of the camera, in the right light, properly composed with the right lens, correct exposure (blown skies anyone?), sharp focus, no camera-shake or movement blur, and you've got to time the shot just right.

If you want to improve your success rate, those are the boxes to tick first. If not, then the image is going in the bin anyway.
 
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#20
Quite often so called "non keepers" turn into "Keepers" if turned into black and white. I am always amazed how different shade of grey make a good photo when in colour they look crap



from this

 
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#21
Thank you both for the replies. I ask because this year my wife and I have decided and booked to go to Japan. Apart from seeing as much as possible photos are a great reminder.
On our previous trip to China I took my Nikon D300 and very nearly run out of cards, so this time I want to have more than enough card space with the 32gb cards and others. I have enough SD cards so no prob there
Great idea. I would have done the same.

But surely that with some of the portable technology, like a smaller laptop or one of those card reader and external drive, at the end of the day when you go back to the hotel, you could transfer the images over to the portable unit, thus freeing up your cards for next day's shooting?
 
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#22

AS you can see I think I now have plenty of memory cards 2 new 64gb ones and the others I already had. Also the camcorder has a 32gb memory built in
Nikon D810 has 2 slots so Raw in first with CF card and second slot the SD card as backup. that is how I have it set up

So thanks for the advice again
I remember in my teenager days, having to carry as many rolls of 35mm film as I fit into my camera bag's main compartment. Nowadays, memory cards being flat, you could just slide them into your kit bag's front, side, or back pockets, leaving the main compartment with room for more lenses or your packed lunch!
 
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#23
I remember in my teenager days, having to carry as many rolls of 35mm film as I fit into my camera bag's main compartment. Nowadays, memory cards being flat, you could just slide them into your kit bag's front, side, or back pockets, leaving the main compartment with room for more lenses or your packed lunch!

Going on a flight so weight and size restrictions apply. therefore I use this as a solution. it still amazes me what it can hold



Bag Tamrac System 6 ( had it for many years) size approx in inches 15" long x 11" wide x 9" tall. What I would say is this is a very well made product. I have taken it to Brazil-China- Egypt- 2 med cruises- Norway cruise to name but a few and it has never let me down

Inside Nikon D810
Panasonic camcorder, could be upright for another lens
Nikon afs 24-70mm lens ( nearest)
Nikon 50 MM lens (furthest away)
side pocket battery duel charger Bluemax ( can be a used to charge both by changing slot adaptors)
inside room for 2 memory card holders (silver holder showing), 8 SD cards and 4 CF cards+ another CF card in own case
small front pockets for batteries ( others can be placed under 50mm lens and camcorder as there is space)
camera strap (peak design) will be resting on top of camcorder.
other bits and pieces such as swabs fit into top cover which has a mesh pocket
Still have the other side pocket for charger leads etc


If I need say to take 70- 200 mm lens I can carry that as a separate item


For home use or carrying in a car I also have a Tamrac professional bag which takes almost everything I need being a lot larger than the above



or even take a couple of peli cases
 
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