Nostalgia is it a thing of the past?

Messages
8,151
Edit My Images
No
#5
I used to delve down for the free toy when no one was looking :D
And that was the game................................involving the toy with ones imagination.

PS does anyone remember the small toy (not if ever in a cereal box?) that you could put baking soda in and then play in the bath with it? As I recall there were two I had, a diver and a submarine. They would sink down and as the water go to the baking soda rise up................a little like 'wash & repeat' the toy would rise & fall a few times until the soda ran out ~ ah, such simply toys we had to entertain ourselves with back then :)
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
Messages
33,189
Name
Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
Edit My Images
Yes
#6
IIRC the baking soda ones were basically jet propelled boats and the divers/submarines were things you stuck in an water filled Coke bottle (pretty much the only plastic bottles available back then!) with the lid on and they sank when you squeezed the bottle and rose when the pressure was released.
Rarely got to the toys - younger sister would tip all the cereal out onto the table and grab it before I had a chance!
 
OP
OP
Cobra

Cobra

Mr. Floyd
Staff member
Messages
87,983
Name
Phitt, Hissy Phitt
Edit My Images
No
#7
And that was the game................................involving the toy with ones imagination.
(y)
PS does anyone remember the small toy (not if ever in a cereal box?) that you could put baking soda in and then play in the bath with it?
TBH and as much as it pains me to agree with Nod, iirc they were like little steam boats that ran off baking soda
 
Messages
8,151
Edit My Images
No
#8
IIRC the baking soda ones were basically jet propelled boats and the divers/submarines were things you stuck in an water filled Coke bottle (pretty much the only plastic bottles available back then!) with the lid on and they sank when you squeezed the bottle and rose when the pressure was released.
Rarely got to the toys - younger sister would tip all the cereal out onto the table and grab it before I had a chance!
(y)

TBH and as much as it pains me to agree with Nod, iirc they were like little steam boats that ran off baking soda
Well, my recall could obviously be poor as I don't recall the 'steamboats' type of toy but I am thinking the timeframe might have been anywhere between 1958 (perhaps a year or two earlier?) to say mid 60's (depending on how old I was when I gave up toys in the bath) :LOL:

PS I certainly don't readily remember plastic bottles........ everything I thought was in glass but no idea when the first plastic bottles appeared.
 
Messages
8,228
Name
Jeff
Edit My Images
No
#11
I can remember making steam powered boats for the bath , a balsa wood plank /strip with a balsa block glued either end and a cigar tube glued on top half filled with water and a pin hole pierced in the end .. light a small candle under the cigar tube and it would happily chug up and down the bath for ages , or until one of the nasty German pretend bombers dropped a wet sponge on it from above . Them were the days ‍
 
Messages
8,151
Edit My Images
No
#12
I can remember making steam powered boats for the bath , a balsa wood plank /strip with a balsa block glued either end and a cigar tube glued on top half filled with water and a pin hole pierced in the end .. light a small candle under the cigar tube and it would happily chug up and down the bath for ages , or until one of the nasty German pretend bombers dropped a wet sponge on it from above . Them were the days ‍
Did you ever try one of those Jetex engines on a model (water or land)? I tried a few land based....................but boy was the lighting & fuel finicky to get a reliable start.
 

MartynK

Opting Out.
Messages
4,793
Name
Martyn
Edit My Images
No
#13
Did you ever try one of those Jetex engines on a model (water or land)? I tried a few land based....................but boy was the lighting & fuel finicky to get a reliable start.
I was trying to remember what those were called...

IIRC they use solid fuel pellets and, yes, they were a serious pain to get going!
 
Messages
8,228
Name
Jeff
Edit My Images
No
#14
Did you ever try one of those Jetex engines on a model (water or land)? I tried a few land based....................but boy was the lighting & fuel finicky to get a reliable start.
Oh yea the ones that the fuel pellets looked like thick brown washers , god knows what I tried them on but never reliable if I remember rightly .... one thing I did discover as I grew up was airfix model boats weren’t waterproof .
 
OP
OP
Cobra

Cobra

Mr. Floyd
Staff member
Messages
87,983
Name
Phitt, Hissy Phitt
Edit My Images
No
#15
Did you ever try one of those Jetex engines on a model (water or land)? I tried a few land based.
Jeeze yeah I had a helicopter powered by two, getting them both to light roughly at the same time, was a bit challenging to say the least :D
 

Tori_T

Staff member
Messages
8,252
Edit My Images
Yes
#16
Just looked them up.
Seems the fuel absorbed atmospheric moisture once opened, and quickly became inert.
Did you know Gerry Anderson used them for the rocket effects on Thunderbirds et al?
 
Messages
4,568
Edit My Images
Yes
#17
PS I certainly don't readily remember plastic bottles........ everything I thought was in glass but no idea when the first plastic bottles appeared.
It was all glass when I was a lad, and not many empties around either, as you could get a few old pennies deposit back for returning them to the shop! Corona was a well known name in Northwest England, and you got money back for their empty pop bottles. I used to like Tizer too, particularly when eating fish and chips, but I'm not sure it tastes the same these days.

Also, do you remember the yellow cellophane wrapping on Lucozade bottles? You only ever got given Lucozade when you were ill in those days, and my mum could always tell when I was getting better as she'd catch me looking at the room through a piece of yellow cellophane! Perhaps that's why I like to use a yellow filter when shooting black and white film! :giggle:
 
Messages
1,057
Name
Graeme
Edit My Images
No
#18
It was all glass when I was a lad, and not many empties around either, as you could get a few old pennies deposit back for returning them to the shop! Corona was a well known name in Northwest England, and you got money back for their empty pop bottles. I used to like Tizer too, particularly when eating fish and chips, but I'm not sure it tastes the same these days.

Also, do you remember the yellow cellophane wrapping on Lucozade bottles? You only ever got given Lucozade when you were ill in those days, and my mum could always tell when I was getting better as she'd catch me looking at the room through a piece of yellow cellophane! Perhaps that's why I like to use a yellow filter when shooting black and white film! :giggle:
I used to buy a bottle of Tizer from the village shop on the way home from my Saturday job to accompany the cottage pie while watching The 6 - 5 Special followed by Wagon Train.
Deposit on the bottle was 3d.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
Messages
33,189
Name
Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
Edit My Images
Yes
#20
And South West. Corona for orangeade and cherryade but R White's (I'm a secret lemonade drinker...) for lemonade. There was also Cresta but that was too frothy (man).
 
Messages
8,151
Edit My Images
No
#23
It was all glass when I was a lad, and not many empties around either, as you could get a few old pennies deposit back for returning them to the shop! Corona was a well known name in Northwest England, and you got money back for their empty pop bottles. I used to like Tizer too, particularly when eating fish and chips, but I'm not sure it tastes the same these days.

Also, do you remember the yellow cellophane wrapping on Lucozade bottles? You only ever got given Lucozade when you were ill in those days, and my mum could always tell when I was getting better as she'd catch me looking at the room through a piece of yellow cellophane! Perhaps that's why I like to use a yellow filter when shooting black and white film! :giggle:
For sure Lucozade..........none too sure but think I might have been given that in hospital when I was there aged 4 with a broken leg (I missed the whole of my first year at school becuase of that little accident..............in plaster from hip to foot :( )

Re: Corona ~ you in SE too and remember the R Whites/Corona lorry delivering round our estate for years. As noted by @Mag1cp2x they were deposit bottles but not too sure it was 3d per bottle, I think maybe less???

I used to buy a bottle of Tizer from the village shop on the way home from my Saturday job to accompany the cottage pie while watching The 6 - 5 Special followed by Wagon Train.
Deposit on the bottle was 3d.
Ah! Tizer...........not my favourite but all pop was what made a childhood :)
Same in the South East
:)
And South West. Corona for orangeade and cherryade but R White's (I'm a secret lemonade drinker...) for lemonade. There was also Cresta but that was too frothy (man).
Cresta ~ did not last that long!
What a blast from the past.
 
Messages
1,973
Edit My Images
No
#24
I think I recall hearing that that was Elvis Costello's father singing in that advert.
Yes, Ross Mcmanus is Elvis costello's father.
 
Messages
4,119
Name
Dave
Edit My Images
Yes
#28
It was all glass when I was a lad, and not many empties around either, as you could get a few old pennies deposit back for returning them to the shop! Corona was a well known name in Northwest England, and you got money back for their empty pop bottles. I used to like Tizer too, particularly when eating fish and chips, but I'm not sure it tastes the same these days.

Also, do you remember the yellow cellophane wrapping on Lucozade bottles? You only ever got given Lucozade when you were ill in those days, and my mum could always tell when I was getting better as she'd catch me looking at the room through a piece of yellow cellophane! Perhaps that's why I like to use a yellow filter when shooting black and white film! :giggle:

I remember Lucozade being a drink you had when you were ill but I a had forgotten about the cellophane wrappers - just tumbled back in time there, Mr B.

Dave
 
Messages
1,284
Name
Tim
Edit My Images
Yes
#30
It was homemade elderflower fizzy drink at our house in the 70s :)
 
Messages
4,568
Edit My Images
Yes
#31
I remember Lucozade being a drink you had when you were ill but I a had forgotten about the cellophane wrappers - just tumbled back in time there, Mr B.

Dave
Another blast from the past was one of those pyramid shaped blocks of frozen orange juice wrapped in some sort of waxed paper tetra-pack, which I think were called a Mumbo or something like that. I seem to recall they were quite cheap but I was never sure how to eat one... you'd have needed teeth like a beaver to bite bits off it! The other thing I used to avoid was a sherbet fountain... it seemed to go from burning the back of your throat out to completely blocked in about three goes! One of the great mysteries of life, like whatever happened to white dog poo?!
 
Messages
4,275
Name
mike
Edit My Images
Yes
#33
Another blast from the past was one of those pyramid shaped blocks of frozen orange juice wrapped in some sort of waxed paper tetra-pack, which I think were called a Mumbo or something like that. I seem to recall they were quite cheap but I was never sure how to eat one... you'd have needed teeth like a beaver to bite bits off it! The other thing I used to avoid was a sherbet fountain... it seemed to go from burning the back of your throat out to completely blocked in about three goes! One of the great mysteries of life, like whatever happened to white dog poo?!
Did you eat that as well
 
Messages
4,119
Name
Dave
Edit My Images
Yes
#35
Another blast from the past was one of those pyramid shaped blocks of frozen orange juice wrapped in some sort of waxed paper tetra-pack, which I think were called a Mumbo or something like that. I seem to recall they were quite cheap but I was never sure how to eat one... you'd have needed teeth like a beaver to bite bits off it! The other thing I used to avoid was a sherbet fountain... it seemed to go from burning the back of your throat out to completely blocked in about three goes! One of the great mysteries of life, like whatever happened to white dog poo?!

Ah, you mean Jubbly - https://www.doyouremember.co.uk/memory/jubbly-frozen-drinks

I don't remember at the time but I bet they relied on being so cold that you didn't twig they had very little flavour.

Dave
 
Messages
4,119
Name
Dave
Edit My Images
Yes
#36
brings back great memories of my nans up in scotland, me and my brother talk about it all the time

On our earliest holidays in Scotland with the kids in the late 80's and into the 90s the kids (and if I'm honest, me and Mrs Tringa too) looked forward to buying the tins of Creamola Foam.

Dave
 
Messages
29,712
Name
Bat-Frog
Edit My Images
No
#38
As a kid, I lived very close to the Corona factory.
We used to take empty bottles to the gates for free refills!
 
OP
OP
Cobra

Cobra

Mr. Floyd
Staff member
Messages
87,983
Name
Phitt, Hissy Phitt
Edit My Images
No
#39
Another blast from the past was one of those pyramid shaped blocks of frozen orange juice wrapped in some sort of waxed paper tetra-pack
Ah yes I remember those, we used to keep squashing them until they were soft enough to drink. I guess that would be the original "Slushy"

Then there was the guy with his ( morris minor I think) van that used to come around selling paraffin, he would also take rags in exchange for sweets.
Recycling was obviously just beginning in the early 60's (y)
 
Messages
29,712
Name
Bat-Frog
Edit My Images
No
#40
Another blast from the past was one of those pyramid shaped blocks of frozen orange juice wrapped in some sort of waxed paper tetra-pack, which I think were called a Mumbo or something like that. I seem to recall they were quite cheap but I was never sure how to eat one... you'd have needed teeth like a beaver to bite bits off it! The other thing I used to avoid was a sherbet fountain... it seemed to go from burning the back of your throat out to completely blocked in about three goes! One of the great mysteries of life, like whatever happened to white dog poo?!
Jubblies are still going strong.
I have several in my freezer. :)
 
Top