Olympus OM-D E-M5, E-M1, E-M10 & Mark 2 Owners Thread

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Maarten
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E-M1II + 12-40 f/2.8 - ISO 25,600:

20181205_201247_100
by Maarten D'Haese, on Flickr

Struggled with flash in the venue so ditched the flash at some point and went for extremely high ISO - not recommended if you can avoid it. Also the camera struggled to lock focus in next to no light.
 

Skyline

Emmet Brickowski
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Dave
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I had to put up another fox as the other day we was in Greenwich park and the fox came out. I'm sure it's recognising us now. We called it over and over it came. We had some dog and cat treats for it. The thing that was different this time was, it was an arms length away. It was happy with us but very of edge with anyone else walking past. This tine I took about 3 pictures than just sat there with him. He was with us for a bout 20 minutes before a loud group came by and scared him of. Until next time Mr Fox :)


EM10ii and Sigma 60mm

 
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Jake
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WOW! Wow wow Slyelessar! Thats such a surreal image. It really struck me as soon as I scrolled over it. What is the leaf in? It looks like mud?
 
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Slyelessar
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WOW! Wow wow Slyelessar! Thats such a surreal image. It really struck me as soon as I scrolled over it. What is the leaf in? It looks like mud?
Cheers!

Actually it is in pond water. A really big pond at Chartwell, and oddly the leaf just hit the water and didn’t create any ripples, apart from what you see.
 
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Alf
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E-M1II + 12-40 f/2.8 - ISO 25,600:

20181205_201247_100
by Maarten D'Haese, on Flickr

Struggled with flash in the venue so ditched the flash at some point and went for extremely high ISO - not recommended if you can avoid it. Also the camera struggled to lock focus in next to no light.
Well I would have risked a slower shutter speed to lower the ISO myslef
How low can you go at 38mm?
I would also use MF.
 
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Alf
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I thought with xmas around the corner and so many interesting night shots possible in the next few months it would be an excellent time for me to get to know how to use it.
This is an hour on my E-M1 the sky is what the camera produce I created the reflection from the sky the water was not still enough

Buttermere startrails
by Alf Branch, on Flickr
 
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Graham
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7Artisans 25mm arrived yesterday. I've not had a chance to use it yet in any meaningful way but some quick first impressions are that it feels nicely made. Very small, I would say similar to a Olly 45mm 1.8. Focus ring turn smoothly. I mean, we're not talking Carl Zeiss here but I was pleasantly surprised as I was half expecting them to feel rough. aperture ring is not clicked which seems very weird at first but I guess videographers would love it, though I think it could do with having a touch more resistance. The focus ring has a very small throw so precise focus for close up stuff is tricky on first acquaintance. I'm at a Christmas light show thing at our local park tomorrow so will take it along and see how it goes.

Oh, one annoyance, I'd forgotten that the E-M5ii doesn't not automatically initialiise peaking with non-communicating lenses no matter whether you're in manual focus mode or not. You have to assign a button to peaking, which is fine I suppose but I already had all my buttons doing exactly what I wanted them to. Need to give that some more thought.
Well I hate to quote my own post but anyway...

Tried the lens out last night at a local event and I'm over the moon with it. I have no doubt that a side by comparison with the Olly 25mm would show up some shortcomings but for less than £50 new you almost expect something unusable or toy like and yet the image quality is really quite nice. Plenty sharp enough wide open and nice bokeh. Corners are probably not perfect but it'll never get used for anything where that matters. I'm pleased as punch.

Only other gripe worth mentioning is that because the aperture ring is de-clicked and because the the small size of the lens dictates that the focus and aperture rings are close together, I have found myself changing the aperture without realising. It's not that obvious in the VF either as sometimes adjusting aperture can bring stuff into focus as you increase DOF so you think everything is hunky dory until you realise you've just tried to shoot a portrait in the dark at f/16! Anyway, now that I'm aware of that, I'm training myself to hold the focus ring in a way that keeps my sausage fingers away from the aperture control. Seems to be working.

Highly recommended if, like me, you like messing around with MF lenses or, again like me, you don't really need a fast prime so hard to justify the £200 ish for an Olympus option.
 
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Ned
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Well I hate to quote my own post but anyway...

Tried the lens out last night at a local event and I'm over the moon with it. I have no doubt that a side by comparison with the Olly 25mm would show up some shortcomings but for less than £50 new you almost expect something unusable or toy like and yet the image quality is really quite nice. Plenty sharp enough wide open and nice bokeh. Corners are probably not perfect but it'll never get used for anything where that matters. I'm pleased as punch.

Only other gripe worth mentioning is that because the aperture ring is de-clicked and because the the small size of the lens dictates that the focus and aperture rings are close together, I have found myself changing the aperture without realising. It's not that obvious in the VF either as sometimes adjusting aperture can bring stuff into focus as you increase DOF so you think everything is hunky dory until you realise you've just tried to shoot a portrait in the dark at f/16! Anyway, now that I'm aware of that, I'm training myself to hold the focus ring in a way that keeps my sausage fingers away from the aperture control. Seems to be working.

Highly recommended if, like me, you like messing around with MF lenses or, again like me, you don't really need a fast prime so hard to justify the £200 ish for an Olympus option.

PICS!!!
 
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Damion
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Has anyone in this thread got any experience of using a auto trigger for water droplet photography with Olympus cameras ?
 

damianmkv

Uh oh, a fruit basket!
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Got a bit frustrated with manual focus today. Went to Brighton for an hour or 2 and found that focus peaking worked well on solid structures but not so good on my son. Probably got 3 shots maximum that were reasonably in focus

Wondering if it's worth the hassle. Given the right light and background, the Helios can be great but it's not great for my typical shooting i.e. It's too long and I want to take great portraits with it but...
 
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Graham
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Got a bit frustrated with manual focus today. Went to Brighton for an hour or 2 and found that focus peaking worked well on solid structures but not so good on my son. Probably got 3 shots maximum that were reasonably in focus

Wondering if it's worth the hassle. Given the right light and background, the Helios can be great but it's not great for my typical shooting i.e. It's too long and I want to take great portraits with it but...
Got to say I find it quite hit and miss too but I never really grew up with MF so it doesn't come naturally to me at all. One thing that I've found helps me a little is to not try to nail focus with the lens itself but to get it close nice and quickly and then move the camera in or out a little to get the last bit of adjustment. It means that your composition changes a little so sometimes need to leave a little crop room for later but I find it easier to get accurate focus that way (not that my keeper rate is particularly high anyway!). I find the peaking itself reasonably accurate, or at least it is if the lens is wide open, the more stopped down I go, the harder it is to judge critical focus although it maybe matters less at that point. I guess you could try zoom too but if your son stands still long enough to make that work, then he's very different to mine!

And then lastly, if all else fails, you could use the crazy FPS speeds and do a spray and pray technique, shooting as you adjust focus front and back. Not clever and you'll get 20 bad images for every good one but you might just nail one that you love.
 
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Maarten
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Damion
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OK , Iv got a couple of the heannel ones and they are good when new but don’t seem to produce as much shots per charge as they get older
They are cheapish I seem to remember .
 
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Can anybody recommend some decent but reasonably priced batteries for my EM-1 please?
Ex-Pro, work just as good as the originals for me.
 
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I've got 3 batteries for my OMD EM1 Mk1. The original Olympus battery, a Hahnel battery and an An-Mann battery, which came with the secondhand camera. They all charge in the original Olympus battery charger with no issues and I've haven't noticed any significant differences between the three. I am normally using two batteries at once, one in the camera and one in the grip, camera set to grip battery priority. It does switch seamlessly once the grip battery is exhausted. I've yet to go to the third battery on an all day shoot.
 
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