Street photography problem

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Jamesev
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#41
Street photography I am learning is 90% balls.

There are big ball images and small ball images. It’s not hard to spot the difference ;)
Those sorts of images in social reportage are the ones that could get you in trouble :LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL:

I agree with this quote totally. You can see in many street photos the suspicious look on people's faces. If they see someone taking photos with a dslr they think you're a weirdo but think nothing when hundreds of people around them are taking photos with their smart phones.
That kinda depends on what you want to get out of it. If you are the type of person with a lasting complex about what people (in in social reportage you most likely will never meet ever again) think of you, ie "weirdo" then this type of photography isn't for you.

However if you want to improve your skills so when you have taken the photo and someone asks what you are doing you can use the explanation something like "I wanted to capture an interesting person in and interesting situation" to illustrate a story (or invoke the viewer to create a story behind the image), then show them what you just shot then that's what you need to do.

Social Rep.jpg
 
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#42
That kinda depends on what you want to get out of it. If you are the type of person with a lasting complex about what people (in in social reportage you most likely will never meet ever again) think of you, ie "weirdo" then this type of photography isn't for you.

However if you want to improve your skills so when you have taken the photo and someone asks what you are doing you can use the explanation something like "I wanted to capture an interesting person in and interesting situation" to illustrate a story (or invoke the viewer to create a story behind the image), then show them what you just shot then that's what you need to do.
Exactly. If you feel like you're doing something wrong by taking a candid then you either need to re-evaluate why you're taking that photo, or perhaps street photography isn't for you.
Be confident for the reasons you're taking the photo, and be prepared to explain why if someone stops you
 
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#44
I
This isn't true. 35mm gives a certain effect, 70-200 gives a different effect, you use the lens you want to get the effect you're after. If you want to isolate someone and generate a feeling of being alone in a crowd, a 70-200 is perfect. You won't get that with a 35mm. If you want 'the viewer to feel like they're right there', then you need short focal lengths. But one is not inherently better than the other, one is not inherently more street than the other. All focal lengths are valid. Street is content, not style.
Would agree with that. I was listening to Derek Fahsbender's B&H workshop on YouTube again this week and he mentioned he takes out a 70-200 when he can't be bothered to get in close an interact.

The Video is worth a watch for those that haven't seen it already:

 
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#45
I think if people see you as taking their photo regardless of the location and they don't know you they will be curious and react in certain ways. However, if you are taking a photo of a scene and they happen to "walk through it" they may not feel so singled out and threatened. If you do want someone in a photo then you could approach it in that way by making the scene the photo and ask them to be in it to add context. So if you are not following people around and randomly pointing your camera directly at them but remaining at a location for long enough that you start to blend in it might be easier.

Alternately look official and wear a high viz jacket and people won't blink an eye.
 
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Hi Ho Silver away !
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#46
When I first started to shoot street I`d use one of my zooms, but since moving to Fuji I don`t use zooms. Reason why is, zooms are far to easy to spot someone and take a shot from distance so when I went to Fuji X I got my self three Primes and any one of them is good but two are great, the XF 35mm f2 and the XF 50mm f2. If you can then just practice all the time and you will grow to love it, as now when I`m out I will shoot what ever person I see with the camera.
Or if I want to go closer, I`d now use my X100F :)
 
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Andy
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#47
Similar to what others have suggested about lining up a shot and waiting for someone to enter, I remember a tip from somewhere suggesting to keep your camera raised to your eye for longer. Taking a picture and immediately dropping the camera from your eye, particularly if nervous and rushing, may make you stand out more, whereas if the camera is still raised, even if you are close enough that your subject has heard the shutter, they are likely to have moved off and it will appear that you were focusing on something else.

That said, confidence, a friendly approach and talking to your subject will go just as far if you feel comfortable in doing so.
 
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Pete
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#48
It's certainly easier in London as most people are so busy going about their business they don't even notice you.
 
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David
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#49
It's certainly easier in London as most people are so busy going about their business they don't even notice you.
For sure, and you are just another tourist. And *street* is best done in touristy areas.

Something else ..... a camera with a tilt-up screen makes it dead easy. Bring the camera up to eye-level and people look at you, wonder what's going on, wonder what/who the togger is aiming at. keep the camera down at waist level and look at your subject through the camera , no on seems to know or care.
 
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#52
For sure, and you are just another tourist. And *street* is best done in touristy areas.

Something else ..... a camera with a tilt-up screen makes it dead easy. Bring the camera up to eye-level and people look at you, wonder what's going on, wonder what/who the togger is aiming at. keep the camera down at waist level and look at your subject through the camera , no on seems to know or care.
I still think trying to hide it make you look more dodgy than just being blatant about it. Whatever works for each person though I guess.

I mostly use the screen on the back of the camera brought up to eye level (as its quicker), and mostly people are non-plussed. If I get any sort of reaction its overwhelmingly positive with a smile.
 
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#54
I pretend I’m taking a photo of someth8ng beyond the subject, or higher up.

I feel that long lenses are less intimate, more voyeuristic.
 
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#55
I feel that long lenses are less intimate, more voyeuristic.
I think long lenses are a valuable tool in street photography, not because they allow the shooter to hide, but because of the compression effect.
Have become an even bigger fan of zooms of late for street for the versatility in giving me wide, standard or tele depending on the type of shot I want to do.
 
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ian
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#56
I saw a documentary on Don Mcullin, he was out with a 135mm shooting street, said it was his favourite lens for that genre.
 
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Barry
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#61
I upload street images to stock sites, confidence does grow with time, It does help not having a too intrusive set up, point a 600mm lens in someones face and they probably would object.

I mostly use a Canon M50 with Canon EF-M 11-22 mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens.

There are some no go areas', most shopping precincts in the UK you need prior permission, never shoot people using bank atm's.

I been stopped and questioned by the police and security staff, once I explain what I'm doing in a polite manner I never have any problems.

I have had bank staff running out asking why I'm taking images of their bank. Once I inform them that bank images sell well due to their recent illegal practices they skulk back inside.
 
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