Wellies and alternatives???

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#1
.......ok not strictly camera kit but still vital when/as needed ;)

Now, I have a decent pair of wellingtons (though now quite old) that I wear with thermal socks as needed when muddy & wet conditions under foot are anticipated. However they are not great for anything more than short walks due to lack comfort & grip on the ground.

But especially when sitting in a hide my feet can get quite cold! :(

So to the question?
I have seen an alternative approach with another type of wet & muddy conditions walking re: Dirt Boots, Stable Boots and at least one other 'name' that escapes me right now. They all share the same basic pattern of foot area being fully waterproof like a Welly but the rest of the upper is also weather/water resistant though made of other materials......with a closure that typically has a gusset with either velcro and/or laces to complete the securing to the foot.

Has anyone used or still using such boots and as such any brand & model recommendations???

TIA :)
 
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Lee
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#2
I have a pair of Dunlop fleece lined Wellies. They are the best I've ever bought. For about £25 iirc from Go Outdoors a few years ago. Wear them almost as much as my hiking boots! And easily done two of the big Brecon's waterfall walks in one day!
 

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#3

sirch

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#4
Neoprene wellies are warm, I find mine too warm most of the time but probably won't help with the grip, although I've never had a grip problem with mine.
 

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#6
Another approach it to do like the army do and use dubbin on good leather boots.

Has to be better than stone cold wellies
 
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#9
I gave up on welly type boots for fishing a long time ago. Decent height leather boots with a gusseted tongue are much better. Look in shooting shops for 9" or higher. Some are also available with thermal linings if you suffer from really cold feet. Much better than walking boots for paddling in water and mud. They ain't cheap though.

 
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#13
I find these Neos overboots are very useful. I keep them in the car in bad weather and they keep my feet dry in up to 6 inches of water. Mine are about 8 years old now...

Neos Overboots HX90 DSC00027.JPG
 
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#14
If after more of a walking boot and waterproof etc I myself use
Salomon quest 4d 3 gtx they are great boots pretty light comfy and fully waterproof
 
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#17
Another vote for Muckboots. I have a pair of their Arctic Sport range and they are the best boots in terms of warmth, comfort and grip I have ever worn.
 
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#18
Many thanks all for the user experiences and suggestions... ..so far :)

I have heard of a few of the brand names mentioned but not others, so a fair bit to absorb and digest.

My initial and general thought would be to try to keep the budget to max £50, so shall have to 'work out the options'.
 
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#19
I think the biggest problem you may find these days is quality and longevity. I wear waterproof footwear a lot for work and have tried all sorts of makes and designs over the years. Leather with waterproof lining will eventually leak as the waterproof lining breaks down, and leather can be a real nuisance to dry out in time for the next day without resorting to artificial heat and increasing the risk of the leather cracking. That nuisance factor goes for leather-lined rubber footwear too if it gets wet with sweat. It sounds unpleasant but it happens, particularly if your wearing the boots all day and working hard (which can include slogging up and down hills all day).

These days, in winter when wet ground and mud are at their worst, I wear high-quality neoprene-lined natural rubber wellingtons. I've tried the rubber/PVC lower and neoprene upper type 'muck' boots, and I've found that eventually the PVC/rubber foot part split away from the neoprene upper. At least with neoprene-lined wellies the liner is inside the waterproof rubber outer so shouldn't part company with it. In summer I wear good quality walking boots when it's dry enough (which seemed to be about two weeks last year! ;)).

There seem to be a few 'cheap' neoprene-lined rubber wellies on the market that have soles made from dissimilar materials (plastics of different hardness/flexibility - and often different colours/transparency), with the ones I've tried, these materials have eventually separated from each other, so I avoid that design these days. I also avoid the 'typical' slightly rigid PVC wellies as they seem to split over time, and if holed on barbed wire, etc, often can't be repaired successfully as the repair glue doesn't seem to stick to them as well as it does to natural rubber (particularly if it's an area that flexes regularly) and tends to peel off.

Unfortunately, there aren't that many manufactures of high-quality traditional hand-made natural rubber boots around anymore, with Le Chameau and Aigle being two of the ones still going. Le Chameau and Aigle neoprene-lined wellies aren't cheap, but if you look after them and clean them off and apply the approved protectant reasonably regularly (and don't store them next to a radiator or in direct sunlight, which will damage the rubber, dry it out and make it perish) then they should last you a good while. Perhaps have a look at the prices at Uttings as a starting point and see if you can find a better offer from a similarly reputable shop? https://www.uttings.co.uk/p100721-l...green-vert-vierzon-bcb1498-b200/#.XiYcOuRCeUk https://www.uttings.co.uk/p112841-a...-unisex-bronze-dark-green-84217/#.XiYULuRCeUk

As with anything, there can be the odd lemon in every batch, so proceed at your own risk and best of luck! Look after whatever you do buy as per the manufacturers instructions, and it should last well if it's a quality product. As with any footwear, it's best to try before you buy and compare different makes to see which fits you and suits your requirements the best. However, a direct, side-by-side, comparison is not particularly easy to do via mail order. Hope the above is useful. (y)
 
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#20
I think the biggest problem you may find these days is quality and longevity. I wear waterproof footwear a lot for work and have tried all sorts of makes and designs over the years. Leather with waterproof lining will eventually leak as the waterproof lining breaks down, and leather can be a real nuisance to dry out in time for the next day without resorting to artificial heat and increasing the risk of the leather cracking. That nuisance factor goes for leather-lined rubber footwear too if it gets wet with sweat. It sounds unpleasant but it happens, particularly if your wearing the boots all day and working hard (which can include slogging up and down hills all day).

These days, in winter when wet ground and mud are at their worst, I wear high-quality neoprene-lined natural rubber wellingtons. I've tried the rubber/PVC lower and neoprene upper type 'muck' boots, and I've found that eventually the PVC/rubber foot part split away from the neoprene upper. At least with neoprene-lined wellies the liner is inside the waterproof rubber outer so shouldn't part company with it. In summer I wear good quality walking boots when it's dry enough (which seemed to be about two weeks last year! ;)).

There seem to be a few 'cheap' neoprene-lined rubber wellies on the market that have soles made from dissimilar materials (plastics of different hardness/flexibility - and often different colours/transparency), with the ones I've tried, these materials have eventually separated from each other, so I avoid that design these days. I also avoid the 'typical' slightly rigid PVC wellies as they seem to split over time, and if holed on barbed wire, etc, often can't be repaired successfully as the repair glue doesn't seem to stick to them as well as it does to natural rubber (particularly if it's an area that flexes regularly) and tends to peel off.

Unfortunately, there aren't that many manufactures of high-quality traditional hand-made natural rubber boots around anymore, with Le Chameau and Aigle being two of the ones still going. Le Chameau and Aigle neoprene-lined wellies aren't cheap, but if you look after them and clean them off and apply the approved protectant reasonably regularly (and don't store them next to a radiator or in direct sunlight, which will damage the rubber, dry it out and make it perish) then they should last you a good while. Perhaps have a look at the prices at Uttings as a starting point and see if you can find a better offer from a similarly reputable shop? https://www.uttings.co.uk/p100721-l...green-vert-vierzon-bcb1498-b200/#.XiYcOuRCeUk https://www.uttings.co.uk/p112841-a...-unisex-bronze-dark-green-84217/#.XiYULuRCeUk

As with anything, there can be the odd lemon in every batch, so proceed at your own risk and best of luck! Look after whatever you do buy as per the manufacturers instructions, and it should last well if it's a quality product. As with any footwear, it's best to try before you buy and compare different makes to see which fits you and suits your requirements the best. However, a direct, side-by-side, comparison is not particularly easy to do via mail order. Hope the above is useful. (y)

^^^^^^^^ These are the boots
 
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#21
My initial and general thought would be to try to keep the budget to max £50, so shall have to 'work out the options'.
I think that budget might well be an issue. Unfortunately £50 is not a lot of money these days (two or three take-away meals for two?) and I've found I've generally got what I've paid for with footwear.
 
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#22
I think the biggest problem you may find these days is quality and longevity. I wear waterproof footwear a lot for work and have tried all sorts of makes and designs over the years. Leather with waterproof lining will eventually leak as the waterproof lining breaks down, and leather can be a real nuisance to dry out in time for the next day without resorting to artificial heat and increasing the risk of the leather cracking. That nuisance factor goes for leather-lined rubber footwear too if it gets wet with sweat. It sounds unpleasant but it happens, particularly if your wearing the boots all day and working hard (which can include slogging up and down hills all day).

These days, in winter when wet ground and mud are at their worst, I wear high-quality neoprene-lined natural rubber wellingtons. I've tried the rubber/PVC lower and neoprene upper type 'muck' boots, and I've found that eventually the PVC/rubber foot part split away from the neoprene upper. At least with neoprene-lined wellies the liner is inside the waterproof rubber outer so shouldn't part company with it. In summer I wear good quality walking boots when it's dry enough (which seemed to be about two weeks last year! ;)).

There seem to be a few 'cheap' neoprene-lined rubber wellies on the market that have soles made from dissimilar materials (plastics of different hardness/flexibility - and often different colours/transparency), with the ones I've tried, these materials have eventually separated from each other, so I avoid that design these days. I also avoid the 'typical' slightly rigid PVC wellies as they seem to split over time, and if holed on barbed wire, etc, often can't be repaired successfully as the repair glue doesn't seem to stick to them as well as it does to natural rubber (particularly if it's an area that flexes regularly) and tends to peel off.

Unfortunately, there aren't that many manufactures of high-quality traditional hand-made natural rubber boots around anymore, with Le Chameau and Aigle being two of the ones still going. Le Chameau and Aigle neoprene-lined wellies aren't cheap, but if you look after them and clean them off and apply the approved protectant reasonably regularly (and don't store them next to a radiator or in direct sunlight, which will damage the rubber, dry it out and make it perish) then they should last you a good while. Perhaps have a look at the prices at Uttings as a starting point and see if you can find a better offer from a similarly reputable shop? https://www.uttings.co.uk/p100721-l...green-vert-vierzon-bcb1498-b200/#.XiYcOuRCeUk https://www.uttings.co.uk/p112841-a...-unisex-bronze-dark-green-84217/#.XiYULuRCeUk

As with anything, there can be the odd lemon in every batch, so proceed at your own risk and best of luck! Look after whatever you do buy as per the manufacturers instructions, and it should last well if it's a quality product. As with any footwear, it's best to try before you buy and compare different makes to see which fits you and suits your requirements the best. However, a direct, side-by-side, comparison is not particularly easy to do via mail order. Hope the above is useful. (y)
^^^^^^^^ These are the boots
I think that budget might well be an issue. Unfortunately £50 is not a lot of money these days (two or three take-away meals for two?) and I've found I've generally got what I've paid for with footwear.
Hmmm! certainly giving me more food for thought.
 
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#24
If you do decide to go for one of the more premium brands then I would buy from a reputable shop/company and keep the receipt safe, as you will need that in the event of any warranty claim; and don't forget to follow any aftercare instructions. It's like photographic equipment, even the best makes can sometimes go wrong, and in the absence of a dated proof of purchase from a recognised retailer then you're usually on a hiding to nothing with any warranty claim.

Also, do make sure they fit your feet properly and don't rub your heel, etc. or you'll have wasted your money whatever you buy!
 
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#25
Carhartt boots for me. Out every day in the winter, walking 3-5 miles through extremely thick muddy wet woodland and my feet have been dry as a bone as well as protected from trips and bashes due to hidden stumps. Every week or so or whenever I'm not going to walk for a couple of days they come in, get washed in the sink, dried at room temp and re-dubbed. I never thought I'd "love" a pair of boots but these things are fantastic. A bit on the heavy side and steel toe-capped which is overkill for a walking boot, but fab.

2019-12-23-kodak3200-m6-06.jpg

Small pic but gives a sense of the conditions.
 
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#26
Muc boots for me had mine for years .permanently in the car in winter
 
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#27
I had a pair of Raichle boots many years ago. Warm, comfortable and waterproof. I rarely bothered cleaning them and never reproofed. Had them for many years before health & work issues stopped me walking so much so they were put away (dirty) for over 7 years. I got them out and used them for a few months till the soles started to crack then break up. Even when the heels finally fell off they were still waterproof. I was going to get another pair but they are now Mammut and possible a different fit so wanted to 'try before I buy' but couldn't find a local stockist at the time.

Boots are personal and what works for one does not always work for others.

As for a budget of £50 for a good pair, pipe dream springs to mind. I'm lucky if I can get basic trainers for that and have only once paid less than £140 for waterproof boots and although waterproof they are not particularly warm or comfortable.

I would suggest you take recommendations as advice, go out and have a look & try on several makes/styles till you find what suits you and then go home with no change from £140
 
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#29
I have a pair of Seeland Estate Vibram 18 inch 5mm neoprene full length zip wellies which are just great
 
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#30
I have had my Aigle's 8 years now, great wellie's, expensive, but I work for a farm supply company and got them discounted. Expect to get another 8 years out of them too.
 
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#31
I think Norman's right about buying good quality if you want something reliable that's going to last for a couple of years or more (depending on rate of use and care). While it's possible to find a bargain, that often only happens after you've bought three of four other pairs first... then by the time you realise they've been good and lasted well you find they've been discontinued and/or the manufacturer has disappeared, so you're back to square one in your search for a replacement.

That seems to be the trouble, the cost of manufacturing a pair of boots by hand using high-quality materials is usually labour intensive and requires skilled craftspeople (I believe it takes one particular manufacturer around 9 months to train someone to make a pair of their wellington boots). The cost of labour has resulted in some manufacturers outsourcing their production to Asia, sometimes with reports of varying results. Firms that don't do this can be faced with a problem; high overheads, a decreasing pool of customers willing to pay the price, and customers that may not return for several years as the product lasts that long.

If things go on as they are, I think it will probably become increasingly difficult to find durable, repairable, high-quality outdoor footwear. As for Muck boots, some people seem to speak well of them, and I've tried a pair in the past. I found them warm and quite comfortable (if a bit on the clumpy side) but after a year or so the neoprene shank started to separate from the PVC/rubber foot, so they ended up in the bin. What seemed to finish them off was having to walk through a knee high field of sopping wet grass for a couple of hours, the boots ended up absolutely wet through (as can be expected) but when I got home I found they were starting to come apart. I switched to natural rubber wellingtons with a neoprene lining (for comfort and warmth) for work after that.
 
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#36
Another vote, for muckboots, especially as I got them for £28 :D My only gripe, which is minor, is getting them off :giggle:
 
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#37
I've bought cheap wellies before and found they deteriorate (salt water, sun...) and aren't as comfortable.
These days I have a pair of Hunter's original wellies with matching fleece socks. This works great most of the time and they are flexible and comfortable. I've worn these for long periods and long walks and found them fine.
I will be looking at getting the neoprene lined version for colder weather.
Hunter do make wellies with Vibram soles too which will give loads of grip.
I bought my Hunters from ebay, brand new boxed for £55. So I'd consider looking there.

Another welly option is Gumleaf boots, they've got some good reviews and are meant to be very comfortable. Designed by farmers who spend all day in their boots. But they aren't cheap (£99 for their standard neoprene lined boots. Though as the saying goes, buy cheap, buy twice.
https://www.gumleaf.com/collections/mens-wellies
 
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#39
MEN'S PURSUIT SHADOW SHORT BOOTS

I've had a look at these as I think that laceups would suit me better than pullons. Has anyone actually used these? Although I have walking boots and can walk through streams they are ankle boots so shallow streams only. I think for photography of the type I will be doing more of short boots are better if I can't find laceup long boots.

Would be good to find a local stockest to try them on but if none do we order according to our norman size or do we add a size for bootsocks?
 
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