Beginner Budget landscape lens recommendations please!

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Name
K
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#1
I'm totally new to this website so hello!

I'm a photography beginner who's wanting to take it a bit more seriously, and am looking for recommendations! I have a Canon EOS 7D (mark I) and am looking for the best landscape/wide angle lenses that you guys use and would recommend please? I currently use 50mm and 18-55mm lenses, but as far as landscape photos go, these don't necessarily produce the best photos.

I'm out of work due to everything going on at the moment and don't have much money to spare, so I ideally don't want to be spending over £200 (I'm expecting to buy a used lens off e.g. eBay, so £200 doesn't have to be RRP, just the resell price). Like I said I'm a novice so if this is unreasonable, feel free to let me know that! I want to make it clear I know lenses are expensive and definitely don't expect the very best for this price by any means, only something that will make my photos look a bit more professional than they do at the moment :)

Did see a Canon 28-200ml lens for a reasonable price second hand, are they any good?

Thanks so much for any recommendations/advice.
 
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Gez
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#2
Canon 28-135 f3.5-5.6 is great value for money and a very handy zoom. Not much to dislike at all and plenty to like.
 
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jason
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#3
My daily lens is a sigma 17-70mm. F2.8-4 so a step up from your kit lens. Also a Tokina 11-16mm F2.8 is a popular choice, which I also use.
 
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#4
In general terms, your 18-55mm should be fine....so to go wider the suggested focal length of 10-22mm on a crop body like the 7D is a reasonable addition to your kit bag.

I have not checked the 2nd hand prices but surmise the Canon 10-22mm EFS will be outside of the budget. But as posted above the Tokina and maybe Sigma might be??

Edit ~ here worth a look see

https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equi...-fit-lenses/canon-ef-s-10-22mm-f-3-5-4-5-usm/

If you search they also show Sigma version.....
 
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Keith
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#6
The Canon 10-18mm STM gets a lot of praise, I've read that it is sharper than the 10-22mm - it is APSC only but that'll be just fine on your 7D
 
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Allan
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#7
I am also new so Hello! :)

My daily lens is a sigma 17-70mm. F2.8-4 so a step up from your kit lens. Also a Tokina 11-16mm F2.8 is a popular choice, which I also use.
The Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 has been on my radar for a while now as well as the Tokina 11-20mm f2.8 lens. Seen a lot of good reviews and you can pick them up fairly cheap second hand!
 
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#9
:agree:

Any lens can used to photograph landscapes...I have in the past not bothered to swap out the 100-400mm....but for wide-open vistas in general 10mm is good, 8mm on a crop body is favoured by some?
 
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Allan
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#10
Don't be fooled that landscape lenses have to be ultra wide angles..... ;)

18mm on crop is plenty for most landscapes. I shoot the majority of mine at 40mm on FF, followed by 85mm & in last place 21mm.
You say this but its becoming more and more frequent that I turn up to a spot and throw some swear words into the wind because my wee 18-55mm kit lens isnt wide enough :(.
 
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Ned
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#11
Don't be fooled that landscape lenses have to be ultra wide angles..... ;)

18mm on crop is plenty for most landscapes. I shoot the majority of mine at 40mm on FF, followed by 85mm & in last place 21mm.

This.

I can almost guarantee that if you buy a UWA lens and you will end up with a whole load of shots with the interesting thing as a dot in the background and a particularly uninteresting rock in the foreground "to add depth".

You say you're a novice, go out and take photos, post them here, ask for improvement, without doubt you are the limiting factor to good photos so the best bang for buck is to make you better, not your kit.
 
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Ned
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#12
You say this but its becoming more and more frequent that I turn up to a spot and throw some swear words into the wind because my wee 18-55mm kit lens isnt wide enough :(.
So then you can buy a UWA knowing you need it as it suits your style and subject, but assuming if you want to shoot landscape you need an UWA is daft.

You have taken the best approach - find the limits of your kit and then you know what you need :)
 
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Allan
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#13
So then you can buy a UWA knowing you need it as it suits your style and subject, but assuming if you want to shoot landscape you need an UWA is daft.

You have taken the best approach - find the limits of your kit and then you know what you need :)
Good point. My worst mistake was buying a Sigma 150-600mm C brand new thinking I'd shoot loads of deer and birds while out photographing landscapes. My deer shots are actually captured using my kit lens... :rolleyes:
 
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Redsnappa
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#15
The 18-55mm kit lens is much better, sharper and less distortion than most people realise. I use almost exclusively the 18-55mm kit lens on my EOS M5 and I'm more than happy with the results I get from it. Regarding the 28-200mm lens on your Wishlist, the 18-55mm kit lens will easily be sharper and have less distortion all round than lens.

Maybe if you try some landscape photography with the kit you already have so practice and get good at landscapes first. then evaluate your wants and needs. One thing you did not mention in you kit list was a tripod, that is a vital accessory if you are serious about landscape photography.
 
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Paul
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#16
I think there are some very valid comments above about UWA lenses - and I have a 10-22 EFS lens which is very good. But I would urge you to use your 50mm. On an APSC body like your that's equivalent to 80mm, which I find works really well for looking for details in the landscape instead of trying to capture it all in one go.

You don't say which 50mm you have. The f/1.4 is excellent and not too pricey.
 
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#17
I would like to echo redsnappa's comment about a tripod. The improvement from using a tripod is likely to be greater than the improvement from using a 'better' lens.

The advantages of a tripod are two fold.
First, virtually no camera shake. There is no point in using a lens with better resolution if you have even small amounts of camera shake.
Second, you are not holding the camera. Holding a camera to your eye for five minutes is nearly impossible so hand-held shots are taken quickly. With a tripod, you can take your time composing and get the composition spot-on.
 
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Alan
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#20
I would like to echo redsnappa's comment about a tripod. The improvement from using a tripod is likely to be greater than the improvement from using a 'better' lens.

The advantages of a tripod are two fold.
First, virtually no camera shake. There is no point in using a lens with better resolution if you have even small amounts of camera shake.
Second, you are not holding the camera. Holding a camera to your eye for five minutes is nearly impossible so hand-held shots are taken quickly. With a tripod, you can take your time composing and get the composition spot-on.
Firstly todays high resolutions may only be an advantage when cropping heavily, pixel peeping for the fun of it or viewing large prints very closely for the fun of it. All of these may be perfectly valid things to do but not everyone needs the ability to do them and see fine detail.

Secondly with longer exposures when tripods show a clear stability advantage comes motion blur from nature which is fine if that's what you want but you'll possibly see it and it could begin to make all that lovely resolution seem a little less lovely.

Thirdly, tripods weigh something, they have bulk and they eat time.

I've had tripods for decades but I don't actually use them that often. They have a time and a place but I think that the decision to use one should be a considered one and not a general rule.
 
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Andrew
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#21
I'm a photography beginner who's wanting to take it a bit more seriously, and am looking for recommendations! I have a Canon EOS 7D (mark I) and am looking for the best landscape/wide angle lenses that you guys use and would recommend please? I currently use 50mm and 18-55mm lenses, but as far as landscape photos go, these don't necessarily produce the best photos.
"these don't necessarily produce the best photos"

Why not?

A category such as 'landscape' photography covers a multitude of things. One of the great equalisers in landscape is the use of small apertures - you often don't need the latest or greatest lenses if you are stopping then down to the likes of F8 to F16. And if they don't quite have the contrast then a bit of post processing can mke up a little for that.

A tripod can be useful. It allows you to use slower shutter speeds when you stop down - and allows you to bracket shots at different exposures to and blend them. A tripod slows you down - and for some people this is a 'good thing' in that it means you commit and think more about what you are doing. For others its extra to carry and that slow down impedes them.

Making time and spending money to actually get out to take photographs is probably the most important thing if you have a half decent camera and lens to start with.
 
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