Nikon D800 or D7200?

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#1
Hello everyone!

A big first post for the forum, so my apologies in advance.
I am in the process of upgrading from my existing kit to something better, however, I would love to hear some input from you guys (especially those who have experience with both systems).

Currently I own an Canon eos 50D, which is admittingly quite long in the tooth. Originally I had bought it 3 years ago second hand, mostly because of the great price, decent image quality and robust body. At the time I really wanted to get a camera for traveling and getting into photography without having to worry about it being lost, damaged or whatever. Over the past 3 years I have used it quite extensively and found that photography has become a major hobby so it is time for an upgrade, especially so since I have ran into a lot of limitations of the 50D.

These limitations are mostly the relatively poor low light performance and relatively low resolution when photographing landscapes. Of course the massively improved IQ of possible upgrades is always nice.

Currently I am eyeing two options:
I have gotten a great offer for a D7200 in excellent condition, low shutter count, with bag and 18-180mm lens (I am normally not a fan of travel zooms, but I read that the optical quality is quite good) for about 525 USD equivalent. The other option is a used D800 which would cost body only 650 USD eq. The D800 since It fits in my price range and seems to be better value for money than equivalent canon bodies. I don’t mind much that they are Nikon and I am currently using canon, since I have all DX lenses anyways that I would need to sell. If I would have stuck with canon I would have gone full frame for sure since the build quality of the 60-70-80D was sorely disappointing.

I have set my budget to be around 1150 USD for now, so with the D800 this would equate to just the body and a good 28-70 (looking at the tamron 2.8 VC). For the D7200 it would mean 625 to splurge on other lenses (looking mostly at the tamron/sigma 17-50 2.8, tokina 11-16, nikkor 35mm 1.8g, nikkor 55-300 f.5-5.6).

Important to consider of course, is the type of photography I do. I mostly do street photography, travel photography, landscapes. I am not (yet) specialized in any specific field of photography, so I suppose general purpose use should be a good description. I have found that I shot most of my pictures with my Tamron 17-50mm 2.8 (so FF 24-70 equivalent). Note that eventhough I do a lot of travel photography, I don’t mind weight so much, since I am a fairly big guy.

I have tried both the D7200 and D800 in the shop, because of my big hands the D800 is far more comfortable The D7200 has very shallow recess for the fingers to grab, and an awkwardly positioned dial (maybe because I am used to the canon dial?). Also I must say I am slightly dissapointed that the build quality of the D7200 is not on par with the 50D, it feels more plasticy.

Advantages D800:
-All advantages of fullframe over APSC
-Better IQ (especially low light, it seems to have about 1 stop less noise)
-Higher resolution
-More comfortable
-Better build quality

Advantages D7200:
-Cheaper
-Cheaper lenses (although would have to sell DX lenses anyways when moving to FF)
-Lightweight
-Wifi
-Better autofocus (Or so I have heard?)

What do you guys think? If you were in a similar situation, what would you pick? And if you had experiences with either camera, which would you pick?
Many thanks in advance!
 
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#4
How often do you shoot in low light? Is this a main factor in your decision as it seems landscape is what you're most into? In this case I would be tempted to go D7200 and the extra lenses. Unless you can find a D800 used for a lot cheaper and can squeeze in an extra lens. The D7200, afaik, is no slouch in the low light performance area.
 
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kawakneurder
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#5
How often do you shoot in low light? Is this a main factor in your decision as it seems landscape is what you're most into? In this case I would be tempted to go D7200 and the extra lenses. Unless you can find a D800 used for a lot cheaper and can squeeze in an extra lens. The D7200, afaik, is no slouch in the low light performance area.
It is definitely not my main factor in the decision. I suppose build quality and ergonomics are what drew me to the D800 in the first place.
From the research I have done the D800 seems to be about a stop better than the 7200, but the 7200 is already leaps ahead of the 50D of course.

Like you mentioned, I am tempted to go for the 7200 for the amount of lenses, but in the long run I am not sure if it would bring me much, since I would need full frame lenses if I inevitably make the step to FF.

My flickr might give some idea of the type of pictures I take, although it is of course not fully representative:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/159623673@N02/
 
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#6
It is definitely not my main factor in the decision. I suppose build quality and ergonomics are what drew me to the D800 in the first place.
From the research I have done the D800 seems to be about a stop better than the 7200, but the 7200 is already leaps ahead of the 50D of course.

Like you mentioned, I am tempted to go for the 7200 for the amount of lenses, but in the long run I am not sure if it would bring me much, since I would need full frame lenses if I inevitably make the step to FF.

My flickr might give some idea of the type of pictures I take, although it is of course not fully representative:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/159623673@N02/

The D800 is very good when it comes to noise handling at higher ISO, but the difference will only really be noticeable above 3200, from what I have seen the D7200 is also very decent. I had the old D90, basically the forerunner o the D7000 series, and I shot gigs using it up to 6400 and results were pleasing enough with a little clean up. The 7200 should be a lot better with the more up to date sensor and tech
 
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#7
Another one to consider is the D750. It can do everything a 800 can do but isn't quite so good for super-high definition landscapes. Resolution is the same as the 7200. Controls are almost identical to a 7200 but it is bigger, video is better and focusing is better. They are also pretty cheap second hand.

The 7200 struggles a bit in really low light compared to a full frame Nikon but the sensor is possibly the best apsc you can get.
 
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kawakneurder
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#8
The D800 is very good when it comes to noise handling at higher ISO, but the difference will only really be noticeable above 3200, from what I have seen the D7200 is also very decent. I had the old D90, basically the forerunner o the D7000 series, and I shot gigs using it up to 6400 and results were pleasing enough with a little clean up. The 7200 should be a lot better with the more up to date sensor and tech
Right, that is what I read as well. I actually managed to borrow the D7200 for a week, so I will see how the quality is and how the camera handles. Sadly I don't have that opportunity for a D800 though...

Another one to consider is the D750.
I did have a look at it, and it is definitely interesting, but slightly out of my budget. I think I would rather have a slightly older model camera but with a more expensive lens (or 2 lenses). If I'd expand my budget to that, I would consider the 5D mk iii as well.
What you mention about resolution, for me the resolution increase on the D800 is not something I am very excited for. Of course it is nice to have the extra mega pixels, but for me, I think 24MP is also plenty.
 
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#9
D800.

Tougher shutter mechanism, better iso performance, better for cropping image, more resolution, really solid build quality, its very very nice to have the bigger viewfinder on full frames.
 
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#10
Any particular reason why? Or mostly the image quality and readiness for the future?
As Caerus mentions, aside from size (if you need a compact camera) it's superior in every way. The full frame form with suit landscapes, city and travel photography nicely.

I would be tempted to use some of the Nikon AF-D primes in place of the 28-70 2.8. There are some really good primes out there and the output from the D800 is really nice.

I loved my D7200 - it was a brilliant starter camera and I shot a lot of city, landscapes, sports and portraits with it! It's brilliant, however moving up to full frame and the control that the pro bodies give you was a welcome step.
 
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#11
I have tried both the D7200 and D800 in the shop, because of my big hands the D800 is far more comfortable The D7200 has very shallow recess for the fingers to grab, and an awkwardly positioned dial (maybe because I am used to the canon dial?). Also I must say I am slightly dissapointed that the build quality of the D7200 is not on par with the 50D, it feels more plasticy.
Decision made!

I would (and did) go with the D800. The D7200 has a higher framerate, but it sounds like that may not be an issue for you. Lenses aren't necessarily more expensive for the D800 since (as mentioned above) you can also use older AF and AF-D lenses (both bodies have their own AF motors, and can therefore use lenses that don't have motors built in, which some cheaper bodies can't). The D800 sensor is really impressive even by today's standards. Check the AF accuracy carefully (including the side sensors) as there was an issue with some early bodies (Nikon had a free fix at the time). Note that the D800 isn't one of Nikon's quieter cameras!
 
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#13
On a side note: If the D7200 is something you decide to go for I will be putting one up for sale that’s in immaculate condition with approx 7k clicks along with a number of lenses and accessories.
 
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#14
Another vote for the D800 (D810 user myself, and used a D3300 when I first started). Something to add which I don't think has been mentioned here is that the quality of FX lenses is generally better than the DX ones, for when you can add to your kit. This makes a much a difference to IQ as anything else.

The D8xx series are big, tough and produce great images!
 
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#15
Another vote for a D800 (of the two), more robust, more mp (which does make a difference) and FX - also it can be had now at a really great price.
 
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#16
For me, the 7200 would fit, but I have small hands and don't like the bulk of my 750 (which is fantastic but not to carry about) I'd go with the camera that feels good to use.
 
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#17
I just to shoot a D800 and D7200 alongside each other while without doubt the D800 is a better camera unless you print bigger than A3 I would go for a D7200.
Personally I found unless you printed really big or you pixel peep I found it hard to tell the difference between the IQ of both cameras, if I was using the D7200 I would look at a 16-80 the 35mm f1.8 dx prime a d a the 70 -300 dx lens. For me that would be a nice very lightweight travel kit.
Now the high iso is better on the D800 so if you shoot regular at 6400 and above it might pay you to go ff and I cant say what you will find better handling wise. But I did notice you mentioned street and personally I much rather do that with a D7200 and a D800 purely for the size difference.
 
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#18
Not only will the D800 give noticeably better performance at higher ISOs (even on highly compressed web stuff like instagram), but you will have access to a vastly larger selection of lenses at 1:1 ratio. It will also be more future proof as you develop your hobby. As an owner of a D7100 I can say I only use it where size / weight is a concern. TBH I doubt the 7100 is better than a Fuji X100F and for street, were I serious about weight and general ease of handling I think it's be a no-brainer.
 
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kawakneurder
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#19
Thank you all for your replies! They are very helpful.

D800.

Tougher shutter mechanism, better iso performance, better for cropping image, more resolution, really solid build quality, its very very nice to have the bigger viewfinder on full frames.
I tried both side by side, and actually I did not notice a big difference in viewfinder size. Although from reading about it, the D800 does offer a nice crop view whilst greying out the area that you wont use.

As Caerus mentions, aside from size (if you need a compact camera) it's superior in every way. The full frame form with suit landscapes, city and travel photography nicely.
....
I loved my D7200 - it was a brilliant starter camera and I shot a lot of city, landscapes, sports and portraits with it! It's brilliant, however moving up to full frame and the control that the pro bodies give you was a welcome step.
Indeed, the control and handeling do have me leaning towards the D800, although its not as comfortable as the D850 which I tried in the shop as well.

I would be tempted to use some of the Nikon AF-D primes in place of the 28-70 2.8. There are some really good primes out there and the output from the D800 is really nice.
... (as mentioned above) you can also use older AF and AF-D lenses ...
I used to have a nifty 50 for my canon, but noticed I didn't use it a lot at all, mostly sticking with the 35mm 1.8. So following this, I am sure to get a 50 1.8G (or D?) with the D800, or the 35 1.8G with the D7200. any recommendations next to that?
I think for AF-D lenses the old holy trinity (17-35 f/2.8 28-70 f/2.8 80-200 f/2.8) are very well regarded, aren't they. Does the sharpness hold up even for the high MP of the D800 though?

The D7200 has a higher framerate, but it sounds like that may not be an issue for you. ......
Check the AF accuracy carefully (including the side sensors) as there was an issue with some early bodies (Nikon had a free fix at the time). Note that the D800 isn't one of Nikon's quieter cameras!
I think you are right, I like to frame up my composition and take the shot when I think its there more, than I like to spray and pray. I rarely use the continuous shot mode on my 50d. I suppose if I wanted to shoot sports or birds in continuous, I could always still use that camera since it has a fairly respectable 6.3 FPS.
Is there any resource as to how to check the AF accuracy?
I did hear about the notoriously loud and heavy slapping mirror. I suppose that is a big improvement of the 810 over the 800.

if you can stretch to the D810 instead it is a far better camera than the D800, I own both. Apart from no AA filters which seem to produce sharper photos, the video side is excellent in my opinion, lot better than the D800

example D810 and afs 70-200mm f2.8G lens

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpQnBVU9LWA
Thank you for the example! I just checked the prices for D810, and I don't think it would fit in my budget. I really have to keep to a budget otherwise it would keep creeping up since there's always something slightly better for a bit more money! ;) Also, I don't care at all about video, at least not yet.


On a side note: If the D7200 is something you decide to go for I will be putting one up for sale that’s in immaculate condition with approx 7k clicks along with a number of lenses and accessories.
Thank you for the offer, but I already have a great example very close, and I wouldn't need to pay shipping (currently I am in Japan).

Not only will the D800 give noticeably better performance at higher ISOs (even on highly compressed web stuff like instagram), but you will have access to a vastly larger selection of lenses at 1:1 ratio. It will also be more future proof as you develop your hobby. As an owner of a D7100 I can say I only use it where size / weight is a concern. TBH I doubt the 7100 is better than a Fuji X100F and for street, were I serious about weight and general ease of handling I think it's be a no-brainer.
I have used some macro lenses every now and then, and it is very enjoyable to do macro photography. For me, size and weight are not as much as a concern as mentioned above. I also tried some fuji cameras, since there was a sale on the XT100 but they are so small that it hinders the control of the camera. I wish I had smaller hands!
 
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#20
When it comes to the af-d lenses you mentioned. I’d avoid both the 17-35 and 28-70 2.8 lenses. Whilst optically very capable, they have 1st generation af-s motors that are known to give up and there’s no parts for repair anymore.

Af-d lenses don’t have a motor in them and are optically very good and much more affordable. Nikon did a holy trinity of lenses 20-35, 35-70 and 80-200. I own and shoot the 35-70 and 80-200 all day long. Optically very good, the 35-70 isn’t that wide and af isn’t the fastest but they are very cheap (usually around 150).
 
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kawakneurder
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#21
Nikon did a holy trinity of lenses 20-35, 35-70 and 80-200. I own and shoot the 35-70 and 80-200 all day long. Optically very good, the 35-70 isn’t that wide and af isn’t the fastest but they are very cheap (usually around 150).
I have heard good things especially about the 80-200, only disadvantage being it is a big and heavy lens. Although, I do not mind that very much. There seem to be two variants, a push pull and regular, the push pull seems to be significantly cheaper here in Japan, is the latter optically superior to the former?
It's a shame it doesnt come with a tripod collar or VR though. But can't have everything for no money of course.
 
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#22
Funny you should say macro. It's the only reason I keep my D7100, as I have a super-cheap-but-excellent Sigma macro lens. I don't do macro often enough to justify a lens for my FF system, so the 7100 is useful for this. Sigma 50mm F2.8 DG can be yours secondhand for 100 quid. If you can live with the pretty awful AF and use it manual it is a real bargain.
 
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#23
I have heard good things especially about the 80-200, only disadvantage being it is a big and heavy lens. Although, I do not mind that very much. There seem to be two variants, a push pull and regular, the push pull seems to be significantly cheaper here in Japan, is the latter optically superior to the former?
It's a shame it doesnt come with a tripod collar or VR though. But can't have everything for no money of course.
I have a push-pull that I have used with various modern cameras (D810/D500/D850/D7500/D750) and it is fine but as you say a bit front heavy without having a tripod foot, however I have shot cycle racing with it without issues and the IQ is superb. Get a good one and it is a super buy - same with the old Nikon 28-70 f2.8, superb IQ ... it's true that various spares are no longer available but that is true of a multitude of older good lenses and not really a reason not to buy at the right price.
 
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#24
I have heard good things especially about the 80-200, only disadvantage being it is a big and heavy lens. Although, I do not mind that very much. There seem to be two variants, a push pull and regular, the push pull seems to be significantly cheaper here in Japan, is the latter optically superior to the former?
It's a shame it doesnt come with a tripod collar or VR though. But can't have everything for no money of course.
I have both versions of the 80-200 af-d... It's one of my favourite for the Nikon system.

I prefer the 2 touch (non push pull) as it focuses faster and to me, is superior optical quality - but that could be the placebo effect! As you do landscapes etc. I would go for the 80-200 2 touch (with a tripod collar). VR isn't that big of deal and isn't a reason not to go for the older 80-200 - they really are superb.
 
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#25
One problem with the 2 touch version is the AF/MF switch ring, which is plastic and tends to crack:

https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/nikon-80-200-af-d-cracked-af-mf-ring.477216/
https://www.photo.net/discuss/threa...00-f-2-8-d-manual-focus-ring-slipping.174410/

There are so many reports of this that it must be a design flaw. At one point someone was even fabricating and selling a metal replacement part, which is what Nikon should have used in the first place. The one touch versions have slower AF, and personally I find the push-pull mechanism rather awkward (it made more sense in the manual focus era).
 
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#26
I think you are right, I like to frame up my composition and take the shot when I think its there more, than I like to spray and pray. I rarely use the continuous shot mode on my 50d. I suppose if I wanted to shoot sports or birds in continuous, I could always still use that camera since it has a fairly respectable 6.3 FPS.
Is there any resource as to how to check the AF accuracy?
I did hear about the notoriously loud and heavy slapping mirror. I suppose that is a big improvement of the 810 over the 800.
https://blog.mingthein.com/2012/07/...-d800-d800e-d4-has-the-left-focusing-problem/
https://blog.mingthein.com/2012/07/04/nikon-d800e-focusing-update-problem-solved/

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkP1bGRQMdM


Mine, bought secondhand, had already gone back to Nikon for the fix according to its paperwork.

Yes, the D810 is quieter in general and has a worthwhile quiet mode (the D800 quiet mode doesn't really help). The framerate is also higher (5fps vs 4).
 
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kawakneurder
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#27
Funny you should say macro. It's the only reason I keep my D7100, as I have a super-cheap-but-excellent Sigma macro lens. I don't do macro often enough to justify a lens for my FF system, so the 7100 is useful for this. Sigma 50mm F2.8 DG can be yours secondhand for 100 quid. If you can live with the pretty awful AF and use it manual it is a real bargain.
That seems to be a very interesting lens indeed. For macro stuff I tend to use the manual focus anyways, so that is fine.

I have a push-pull that I have used with various modern cameras (D810/D500/D850/D7500/D750) and it is fine but as you say a bit front heavy without having a tripod foot, however I have shot cycle racing with it without issues and the IQ is superb. Get a good one and it is a super buy - same with the old Nikon 28-70 f2.8, superb IQ ... it's true that various spares are no longer available but that is true of a multitude of older good lenses and not really a reason not to buy at the right price.
I do agree, I think all these older lenses are automatically dismissed by a lot of people as being inferior, even though optically speaking they can be just as good as modern lenses. Is the 80-200 a true 80-200 or does it have focus breathing like most nikon 70-200s do? Not a terrible concern for me since I don't often shoot portraits, just out of interest.
Edit: From reading a bit more the 80 200 appears to be excellent in terms of focus breathing and actually prefered for portraits over the 70 200

I have both versions of the 80-200 af-d... It's one of my favourite for the Nikon system.

I prefer the 2 touch (non push pull) as it focuses faster and to me, is superior optical quality - but that could be the placebo effect! As you do landscapes etc. I would go for the 80-200 2 touch (with a tripod collar). VR isn't that big of deal and isn't a reason not to go for the older 80-200 - they really are superb.
One problem with the 2 touch version is the AF/MF switch ring, which is plastic and tends to crack:

https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/nikon-80-200-af-d-cracked-af-mf-ring.477216/
https://www.photo.net/discuss/threa...00-f-2-8-d-manual-focus-ring-slipping.174410/

There are so many reports of this that it must be a design flaw. At one point someone was even fabricating and selling a metal replacement part, which is what Nikon should have used in the first place. The one touch versions have slower AF, and personally I find the push-pull mechanism rather awkward (it made more sense in the manual focus era).
I do think the addition of the tripod collar is worth the extra money. That design flaw is a pity, but seems easy enough to fix. As a day job I do engineering, so a bit of DIY work to fix it isn't the biggest issue for me. Still though, this should not be an issue on a lens that was originally quite expensive and pro-grade.
I will try to find both in the shop and try them out. I have never used push-pull for any pictures myself so I will look at how much I find it a nuisance.

https://blog.mingthein.com/2012/07/...-d800-d800e-d4-has-the-left-focusing-problem/
https://blog.mingthein.com/2012/07/04/nikon-d800e-focusing-update-problem-solved/

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkP1bGRQMdM


Mine, bought secondhand, had already gone back to Nikon for the fix according to its paperwork.

Yes, the D810 is quieter in general and has a worthwhile quiet mode (the D800 quiet mode doesn't really help). The framerate is also higher (5fps vs 4).
Quite a nasty problem. This seems like quite a hassle to check, not something you can really do in a shop. Does Nikon still accept the camera for fixing in case of a focussing problem?
Also, I read that cracked frames can be an issue on the D800, but if this is the case the whole focussing system is off, correct?
 
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#28
Quite a nasty problem. This seems like quite a hassle to check, not something you can really do in a shop. Does Nikon still accept the camera for fixing in case of a focussing problem?
Also, I read that cracked frames can be an issue on the D800, but if this is the case the whole focussing system is off, correct?
I wouldn't count on them fixing the AF for free in 2019, unless anyone knows differently. But in any case, I wouldn't buy this sort of camera (at least at normal dealer prices) without a guarantee, and ideally a return period (you should get the latter automatically for anything bought mail order from a shop). The D810 had an issue too (noisy pixels with long exposures) for which there was also a fix. The cracked frame thing is new to me - reports suggest a vulnerability to impact damage or overstressing the tripod mount, which makes me glad I've never liked the idea of Blackrapid-style straps! I'd guess all bets are off if this happens, and the effects would be different to and more serious the left AF sensor issue.
 
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#29
Well, I went to a second hand shop, saw a D800 for a great price (64k yen) and pulled the trigger on it. Seems to be in excellent condition, 6 months warranty and only 18k shots on it. The LCD (and viewfinder) do have a slight green-yellow color cast, but from what I read online this is normal for this camera (sadly).
Tonight I will attempt to test the left side focus issue, but so far I think focus is working fine, and any imperfections in the shot are purely because of me (and me getting used to the nikon interface).
As for the lens, the 28-70 2.8D was about the same price as the tamron 24-70 VC USD, so I went with the tamron. I can't find a lot about the sharpness of the 2.8D, however, the tamron seems to be sharper than the 2.8ED. Even if it might have slightly lower IQ, the addition of 4 extra mm and VC do make it a lot more flexible, and I am planning on getting some primes anyways since they are cheap. The weight of the two was nearly identical, and the build quality very similar (although I'd say the nikon is slightly better). Another Nikon advantage was though, that the focus was lightning quick, maybe the quickest focussing lens I have ever seen. I suppose that says a lot about the screw drive mechanism, and should expect good results for the primes.
As for the 70-200 I am definitely leaning towards the 2.8D, I saw both the push-pull version and 2 ring version of the 80-200, prices respectively 23k and 33k.

I wouldn't count on them fixing the AF for free in 2019, unless anyone knows differently. But in any case, I wouldn't buy this sort of camera (at least at normal dealer prices) without a guarantee, and ideally a return period (you should get the latter automatically for anything bought mail order from a shop). The D810 had an issue too (noisy pixels with long exposures) for which there was also a fix. The cracked frame thing is new to me - reports suggest a vulnerability to impact damage or overstressing the tripod mount, which makes me glad I've never liked the idea of Blackrapid-style straps! I'd guess all bets are off if this happens, and the effects would be different to and more serious the left AF sensor issue.
Yeah I was afraid of that. Luckily I got warranty, so if it has that focus issue, I will just return it to the shop. Seeing the low shutter count on this one I doubt that it has been overstressed a lot. I cannot find any visible nicks or scratches on the body at all, not even the bottom. Also from what I read, when that crack exists focussing issues are abound so I suppose they'd show up in the test I would do later.

If anyone has more lens recommendations, I'd be happy to hear! So far the list of lenses that I am seriously considering are:

Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Aspherical Nikon
Tokina AT-X 16-28 F2.8 PRO FX Nikon

24mm 1.8G/D
35mm 1.8G/D (probably either 24 or 35, leaning more towards the 24)
50mm 1.8G/D
85mm 1.8G/D
105mm 2.8G Macro

80-200mm 2.8D
 
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#30
I have the push pull version and it requires -20 AF fine tune which works great from infinity down to roughly 2.5 meters. Below that range, there is back focus that worsens the closer you get to your subject. (I have to focus on the nose to get the eyes in focus as it's roughly 1 inch out) Obviously each lens and camera combination is different. The same lens on my F5 seems to focus perfectly. A good cheat that appears to work for close up work is to use live view as it uses contrast AF. Beyond that, it's a very capable lens with exceptional quality and is my favourite lens as it is so versatile. Sure, the newer 70-200 versions are superior at 200mm, in the corners and their AF speed is faster, but they are bigger, heavier and significantly more expensive. I won't deny being tempted by the lure of the Tamron SP G2 though.

Here is all of the shots on flickr taken with mine.

One other lens to consider, would be a tokina 100mm f2.8 macro instead of the nikon 105. I bought one for £160 on WEX and find it to be superb. It's a very well constructed lens with a lovely velvet lined hood, excellent sharpness and smooth bokeh.
 
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kawakneurder
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#31
After playing around with the setup a bit, I do start falling in love with the D800 controls, they are very intuitive. Eventhough the D7200 has a faster and better autofocus mechanism and is quieter, the rest of the controls on the D800 are clearly superior.

However, I have ran into an issue with the Tamron 24-70 that leaves me slightly disappointed. The lens shows weirdly 'dreamy' and soft images especially wide open. I think this is a Coma issue, I have posted a separate thread for it:
https://www.talkphotography.co.uk/threads/tamron-24-70mm-f-2-8-di-usd-sp-coma-issue.702012/
If anyone has this same lens, can they confirm that this is an issue with my particular unit? I have tried a DX lens on the D800 and the 24-70 on a D7200 and it seems to be an issue with the lens (luckily). I have 6 month warranty on it, so if it is a lens issue I will just return it and pick a different lens. I am almost tempted to just pick a 24,50 and 85mm prime set instead of a zoom.

I have the push pull version and it requires -20 AF fine tune which works great from infinity down to roughly 2.5 meters. Below that range, there is back focus that worsens the closer you get to your subject. (I have to focus on the nose to get the eyes in focus as it's roughly 1 inch out) Obviously each lens and camera combination is different. The same lens on my F5 seems to focus perfectly. A good cheat that appears to work for close up work is to use live view as it uses contrast AF. Beyond that, it's a very capable lens with exceptional quality and is my favourite lens as it is so versatile. Sure, the newer 70-200 versions are superior at 200mm, in the corners and their AF speed is faster, but they are bigger, heavier and significantly more expensive. I won't deny being tempted by the lure of the Tamron SP G2 though.

Here is all of the shots on flickr taken with mine.

One other lens to consider, would be a tokina 100mm f2.8 macro instead of the nikon 105. I bought one for £160 on WEX and find it to be superb. It's a very well constructed lens with a lovely velvet lined hood, excellent sharpness and smooth bokeh.
Awesome pictures, I guess it really is a good lens as long as you are willing to tweak it a bit to get it working. I saw other people online as well having to tweak the autofocus a bit, but getting great results after they have done so. Most of my shots are further away than 2.5m anyways, so the back focus issue isnt a huge deal. And yeah, the Tamron does look very nice, but the price of the 80-200 cannot be beaten I think.

That tamron macro seems to be around the 200 pound mark here in Japan, the same price point as a good example AF Micro Nikkor 105mm F2.8D. I suppose thats not bad at all if the image quality is very good. I will definitely look into it. Thanks for the tip!
 
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#33
I've owned the D7200 for a few years now and it performs superbly in all conditions. I dropped it on rocks last week and the only damage was the tiny link lever for the inbuilt flash had popped off one end. I just pinged it back on and all is good. A great selection of lenses. I have the SIGMA 17-70mm F2.8-4 as my walkround lens and its a great partnership. The Tokina 11-66mm F2.8 is used for wider shots. Ive just bought a SIGMA 5O-150mm F2.8 but not tried it yet. If you look at my Flickr, most of my photos have been taken with the D7200...https://www.flickr.com/photos/151268867@N06/albums
 
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kawakneurder
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#34
I just returned the 24 70 and got a replacement, which focusses great. So far the sharpness is impressive even wide open. Whilst at the shop I also saw an 80-200 in great condition for a great price, so after the recommendations of everyone here decided to get that one as well. Tomorrow I will go out on a hike to take some sample pictures and get a breath of fresh air from busy Tokyo.

I’d chop the 24-70 for some primes instead. I’ve shot the 24mm and had a bad experience so I’ve always avoided that one... the 50 and 85 are good. I love my 85.

If you can you may find an affordable 180 2.8 af-d... the primes on the d800 are really special.
These are definitely my next lenses on my list to get. So the 24mm isnt great? It is strange since Ken Rockwell does recommend it, although he's quite a controversial figure and his philosophies dont always stroke right with me either. If 24 isn't any good, then what other wide prime would you recommend? I read the Samyang 14mm is quite good and relatively cheap too (being manual focus, which doesn't matter for such a wide angle anyways).

I've owned the D7200 for a few years now and it performs superbly in all conditions. I dropped it on rocks last week and the only damage was the tiny link lever for the inbuilt flash had popped off one end. I just pinged it back on and all is good. A great selection of lenses. I have the SIGMA 17-70mm F2.8-4 as my walkround lens and its a great partnership. The Tokina 11-66mm F2.8 is used for wider shots. Ive just bought a SIGMA 5O-150mm F2.8 but not tried it yet. If you look at my Flickr, most of my photos have been taken with the D7200...https://www.flickr.com/photos/151268867@N06/albums
That is quite an impressive build quality, and holding it in the hands it is indeed sturdy, just not as sturdy feeling as the old 50D or the 800D. But for me the deciding factor was the way it feels in the hands, it is just slightly too small for me.
For the APSC, I do love the Tamron 17-50, I had the non-VC but apparently the VC version is also great (as is the Sigma equivalent).
Love the pics on your flickr though! I do really think in the end it doesn't really matter what camera you use, if you are a good photographer any camera will do. It is just that some cameras make it easier and more convenient to get the shot than others.
 
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kawakneurder
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#36
Well I shot both lenses during a hike, and both are working fantastically now. The D800 sure is a beast, and what others have mentioned you do have to really watch your shooting technique because if you are not having everything under control you can see motion blur.
So far though, I have enjoyed the 80-200 the most. Solid build quality, crystal clear optics and quite fast focusing. Although it is a bit heavy, the look and feel of it definitely cannot be beaten.
I will be uploading some sample pictures later, for those interested and for people who might want to see some samples facing a similar dilemma in the future.
 
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kawakneurder
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#38
For those interested, I have the following two albums with some sample pictures:
Mitake mountain, Tokyo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/159623673@N02/albums/72157711230748281
Yokohama:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/159623673@N02/albums/72157711231491697
On a side note, I have actually found that my 'keepers rate' skyrocketed after using the D800... Maybe that is because I am more careful than usual in my technique and framing, or maybe I am not really challenging myself yet and getting used to the new interface still.
 
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