OFFICIAL I HAVE A NEW (FILM RELATED) TOY THREAD!!

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2,107
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Brian
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Picked up a Primefilm 7250u on my travels for scanning negs. Anyone used one?
Had a look around and it seems reasonable. Most complaints are about speed, but to be honest that will be an issue with any film scanner that doesn't use a webcam style sensor (and they are terrible). If you've not got it already, running it on dedicated software such as Vuescan will likely help.
 
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Rob
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Thanks Cuchulainn, sounds about right now I’ve tried it, pretty good but not the fastest, that’s fine for me though, quality over speed anytime.
 
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Brian
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Thanks Cuchulainn, sounds about right now I’ve tried it, pretty good but not the fastest, that’s fine for me though, quality over speed anytime.
If it's working for you, then that's genuinely the most important thing; I've used a few different scanning methods over the years and none of them are perfect. It's all about making the tradeoffs that you are happy with to get images that you are happy with.
 
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John
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I have three new toys this week.
Butcher's Reflex Carbine from 1924
Hunter 35 from 1957
Chinon Genesis GS7 from 1988. This comes with a 1,3x tekeconverter giving a zoom range from 35mm to 105mm.

All in working condition although the Butcher's Reflex Carbine needs serious lubrication to get the shutter speed below 10 seconds. And I need to find a way of stiffening the reflex chimney as it is rather floppy at the moment.

I have been using the Chinon Genesis this morning and it is quite usable even if a bit cumbersome.

I included the last photo to show the advances in technology between 1957 and 1988. Both cameras do the same job with the same film format - but look at the size difference!
JPEG_20210322_152429_5165651167686357245.jpg JPEG_20210322_152823_4813226611454166906.jpg JPEG_20210322_152925_3029254836785727845.jpg JPEG_20210322_153310_4151141614147926338.jpg
 
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ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
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Chris
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A CLE? Very nice! Not a bad lens, either, I gather....
 
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Dave
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After selling most of my unused film cameras, I was left with a couple of 50/60s rangefinders. these were offered on the auction site at a reduced price but still didn't sell.
I thought, why not keep them and run some film through the Baldina and Voigtlander CLR?
The first to be loaded with film is my 1957-ish Balda Baldina, a mechanical rangefinder with a Baldanar 50mm f2.8 lens (previously named the "Super-Baldina" to differentiate between this and the non-rangefinder versions, laterly all had the rangefinder fitted and the "Super" was dropped).
Whilst playing with the cameras, I was struck by a GAS attack and now have a Radionar f2.8 lensed version on it's way to me.
I found that both the Baldanar and Radionar are three element lenses, the (new ~1955) price of these was around £27 and £31 respectively. Maybe the Radionar is a better lens?
I do hope that I don't fall down the test, test and test hole again.

Baldina2.jpg
 
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Asha

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Oh, bloody hell!

;)
Yessss, you have good reason to be concerned young man ..... You may find it beneficial to lock yourself away ( without being ordered to do so by Boris :p) in an isolated sett so I can’t find you!!!!:bat:

Don’t worry, you won’t be missed by anyone else :exit::LOL::LOL:
 
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Yessss, you have good reason to be concerned young man ..... You may find it beneficial to lock yourself away ( without being ordered to do so by Boris :p) in an isolated sett so I can’t find you!!!!:bat:

Don’t worry, you won’t be missed by anyone else :exit::LOL::LOL:
Now don't be like that, you know you'd miss all the cheek I keep giving you... I'm very generous like that! :LOL:
 
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Paul
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My latest film camera purchase was a mint condition Nikon F4 bought from Japan for £145 delivered and didn't get any additional import charges.
It's a great big heavy lump of a camera and I love it, I bought a collection of Nikon AF-D primes for it (24,28,35,50,85mm) and really enjoy going out with it.
Every time I use it I can't believe it's around 30 years old but still looks like new, even the LCD's are perfect. A classic camera.
 

Asha

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Got given an old French 13x18cm format “chambre” bellows camera today.

There is an artist in the village ( the paintbrushes of which I photographed and printed a little while ago.) who is more than old enough to be my father and this camera belonged to his father.

There is no makers name not on the camera nor on the lens although there are the digits 27 stamped into the wooden frame of the front standard.
The lens is 210mm ( self assessment) f/11-f64

The camera is of tailboard design and as is classic of the French style , the changing of orientation is done by turning not just the rear standard but also the bellows too!

It’s in a poor state.

The groundglass is missing but that is very easily replaced.

There are several splits and breaks to the wood, odd small pieces of wood missing, screws missing etc but I reckon that some tlc will have it working if only for the occasional portrait which is what Vincent wishes me to do with it of him in his home onto a J Lane glass plate.

There is a wooden tripod to come too when it is located.

The lens is potentially functional but the severe balsam separation to the rear element will without doubt have a negative impact on any results.
I do however have a brass lens that can be used as a replacement if necessary.

Two glass plate holders supplied too which with a clean should be fine.

it even has itsoriginal carrying case which is in a sad condition but Vincent has expressed that I retain it as a complete kit so I’ll respect his wishes.


The old wooden contact printing frame that Vincent’s father used for making contact prints is again missing glass and in poor condition but can be restored to use.

I forgot to mention that ironically, even though the outfit has been abused/ neglected ( I suspect not by the original owner!) , the maroon coloured bellows are in excellent condition!!

So why give it to me?
He sees me regularly out with LF kit and has often commented on my passion, enthusiasm and ‘professionalism.
In addition he has seen how , although my kits get used, they are well looked after.
He was going to auction the outfit but decided, based on the above, that he would prefer to see me offer a new life to his fathers pride and joy.
I’m sure he will be delighted if I can actually put it to use here in the village!

I could have done to have photographed the camera before dismantling, but anyway, I’ve already made a start hencemy knowledge of the restoration work involved.



7D4E0BA8-C57C-4323-920A-D5BCB690EA41.jpeg
 

Peter B

FPOTY 2019 and Double Numpty
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Peter
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Got given an old French 13x18cm format “chambre” bellows camera today.

There is an artist in the village ( the paintbrushes of which I photographed and printed a little while ago.) who is more than old enough to be my father and this camera belonged to his father.

There is no makers name not on the camera nor on the lens although there are the digits 27 stamped into the wooden frame of the front standard.
The lens is 210mm ( self assessment) f/11-f64

The camera is of tailboard design and as is classic of the French style , the changing of orientation is done by turning not just the rear standard but also the bellows too!

It’s in a poor state.

The groundglass is missing but that is very easily replaced.

There are several splits and breaks to the wood, odd small pieces of wood missing, screws missing etc but I reckon that some tlc will have it working if only for the occasional portrait which is what Vincent wishes me to do with it of him in his home onto a J Lane glass plate.

There is a wooden tripod to come too when it is located.

The lens is potentially functional but the severe balsam separation to the rear element will without doubt have a negative impact on any results.
I do however have a brass lens that can be used as a replacement if necessary.

Two glass plate holders supplied too which with a clean should be fine.

it even has itsoriginal carrying case which is in a sad condition but Vincent has expressed that I retain it as a complete kit so I’ll respect his wishes.


The old wooden contact printing frame that Vincent’s father used for making contact prints is again missing glass and in poor condition but can be restored to use.

I forgot to mention that ironically, even though the outfit has been abused/ neglected ( I suspect not by the original owner!) , the maroon coloured bellows are in excellent condition!!

So why give it to me?
He sees me regularly out with LF kit and has often commented on my passion, enthusiasm and ‘professionalism.
In addition he has seen how , although my kits get used, they are well looked after.
He was going to auction the outfit but decided, based on the above, that he would prefer to see me offer a new life to his fathers pride and joy.
I’m sure he will be delighted if I can actually put it to use here in the village!

I could have done to have photographed the camera before dismantling, but anyway, I’ve already made a start hencemy knowledge of the restoration work involved.



View attachment 315805
That looks like quite a task you're taking on there Asha, so much respect for doing it. :notworthy::notworthy::notworthy:
 
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some tlc will have it working if only for the occasional portrait which is what Vincent wishes me to do with it of him in his home onto a J Lane glass plate.
I would love to see a copy of that here in whatever form you can reproduce it. Great story and would love to see the progress.
 

Asha

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That looks like quite a task you're taking on there Asha, so much respect for doing it. :notworthy::notworthy::notworthy:
There’s a bit of work involved but I have no intention making it ‘like new’

The bellows appear light tight, the movements fonction pretty much ok and the rear standard accepts the film holders ok so if some clear ( translucent) wood glue will suffice to repair the broken wood sections and pose no light entey problems ( given their locations, I don’t think they will) , then it may come together easier than what it might seem.

Keeps me out of mischief. :p
 

RaglanSurf

Forum Idiot - FPOTY 2017,18
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Nick
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Got given an old French 13x18cm format “chambre” bellows camera today.

There is an artist in the village ( the paintbrushes of which I photographed and printed a little while ago.) who is more than old enough to be my father and this camera belonged to his father.

There is no makers name not on the camera nor on the lens although there are the digits 27 stamped into the wooden frame of the front standard.
The lens is 210mm ( self assessment) f/11-f64

The camera is of tailboard design and as is classic of the French style , the changing of orientation is done by turning not just the rear standard but also the bellows too!

It’s in a poor state.

The groundglass is missing but that is very easily replaced.

There are several splits and breaks to the wood, odd small pieces of wood missing, screws missing etc but I reckon that some tlc will have it working if only for the occasional portrait which is what Vincent wishes me to do with it of him in his home onto a J Lane glass plate.

There is a wooden tripod to come too when it is located.

The lens is potentially functional but the severe balsam separation to the rear element will without doubt have a negative impact on any results.
I do however have a brass lens that can be used as a replacement if necessary.

Two glass plate holders supplied too which with a clean should be fine.

it even has itsoriginal carrying case which is in a sad condition but Vincent has expressed that I retain it as a complete kit so I’ll respect his wishes.


The old wooden contact printing frame that Vincent’s father used for making contact prints is again missing glass and in poor condition but can be restored to use.

I forgot to mention that ironically, even though the outfit has been abused/ neglected ( I suspect not by the original owner!) , the maroon coloured bellows are in excellent condition!!

So why give it to me?
He sees me regularly out with LF kit and has often commented on my passion, enthusiasm and ‘professionalism.
In addition he has seen how , although my kits get used, they are well looked after.
He was going to auction the outfit but decided, based on the above, that he would prefer to see me offer a new life to his fathers pride and joy.
I’m sure he will be delighted if I can actually put it to use here in the village!

I could have done to have photographed the camera before dismantling, but anyway, I’ve already made a start hencemy knowledge of the restoration work involved.



View attachment 315805
Another awesome project, great to see you doing something useful.
 
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Richard
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Asha, I look forward to seeing the finished camera.(y)
 

StephenM

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Stephen
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It's only like a jigsaw, but in glorious 3D. Real jigsawists just do it by matching bits based on colour and shape, but if it's too hard you just refer to the picture on the box...
 

Asha

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Asha
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It's only like a jigsaw, but in glorious 3D. Real jigsawists just do it by matching bits based on colour and shape, but if it's too hard you just refer to the picture on the box...
I hate jigsaws cos I’m hopeless at them :help:
As for thé picture on the box..... , hmmm it’s kinda not available :LOL:

Anyway moving onto more complicated matters...... this may find its way into being the ´new’ soft / blurry / oof portrait lens available only by neglecting a barrel lens optic for a century:confused::oops: :$

i dis initially think it was some sort of lacquer that had been spilt on the glass but no, it’s definetly in between the glass and is not accessible hence afaik its balsam separation ( please correct me if I’m wrong)
D021864C-0693-4848-B920-32AFDC894906.jpeg
6B7A758F-E2B6-47EA-B939-F1953562E930.jpeg
8438CD6A-D2CD-4FC0-98E1-C9585164E2D8.jpeg
 
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John
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What I tell Bestbeloved is that if I was a drinking man, £10 on a Saturday night would be restraint so £40.00 a month on cameras is also restraint with the bonus that my liver is preserved.

This month, I am preserving my liver with a Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta in fine fettle. The folding viewfinder needs a slight touch of oil and the catch for the back needs some attention with Brasso but otherwise it pretty much looks as new. The shutter has not been used in some time as the shutter release is very slow to return to its rest position but half an hour sitting with Bestbeloved in front of the TV, quietly clicking away on the shutter is going to sort that out.

Lens serial number (Carl Zeiss Tessar) has a date of mid 1931, shutter serial number (Compur) has a date of mid 1930, camera body serial number has a date of 1933. Zeiss Ikon bought both lenses and shutters in large batches which could last them years. As this model was introduced in 1933, my camera must be an early example.

The camera uses 120 film and can do either 6 by 9 cm or 6 by 4.5 cm and has the mask for the film gate - these masks usually get lost over 90 years. The 4.5 by 6 mask in the viewfinder is a permanent fixture and so does not get lost.

super ikonta.jpeg
 
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Asha

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Asha
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What I tell Bestbeloved is that if I was a drinking man, £10 on a Saturday night would be restraint so £40.00 a month on cameras is also restraint with the bonus that my liver is preserved.
I'll note excellent reasoning in case i should ever marry again......never, Never, ....did I say NEVER again! :ROFLMAO:
 

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
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Got given an old French 13x18cm format “chambre” bellows camera today.

There is an artist in the village ( the paintbrushes of which I photographed and printed a little while ago.) who is more than old enough to be my father and this camera belonged to his father.

There is no makers name not on the camera nor on the lens although there are the digits 27 stamped into the wooden frame of the front standard.
The lens is 210mm ( self assessment) f/11-f64

The camera is of tailboard design and as is classic of the French style , the changing of orientation is done by turning not just the rear standard but also the bellows too!

It’s in a poor state.

The groundglass is missing but that is very easily replaced.

There are several splits and breaks to the wood, odd small pieces of wood missing, screws missing etc but I reckon that some tlc will have it working if only for the occasional portrait which is what Vincent wishes me to do with it of him in his home onto a J Lane glass plate.

There is a wooden tripod to come too when it is located.

The lens is potentially functional but the severe balsam separation to the rear element will without doubt have a negative impact on any results.
I do however have a brass lens that can be used as a replacement if necessary.

Two glass plate holders supplied too which with a clean should be fine.

it even has itsoriginal carrying case which is in a sad condition but Vincent has expressed that I retain it as a complete kit so I’ll respect his wishes.


The old wooden contact printing frame that Vincent’s father used for making contact prints is again missing glass and in poor condition but can be restored to use.

I forgot to mention that ironically, even though the outfit has been abused/ neglected ( I suspect not by the original owner!) , the maroon coloured bellows are in excellent condition!!

So why give it to me?
He sees me regularly out with LF kit and has often commented on my passion, enthusiasm and ‘professionalism.
In addition he has seen how , although my kits get used, they are well looked after.
He was going to auction the outfit but decided, based on the above, that he would prefer to see me offer a new life to his fathers pride and joy.
I’m sure he will be delighted if I can actually put it to use here in the village!

I could have done to have photographed the camera before dismantling, but anyway, I’ve already made a start hencemy knowledge of the restoration work involved.



View attachment 315805
Asha, this is a fabulous project and a wonderful story. Any chance of a separate "rebuild" thread, culminating in your portrait of Vincent? (y)
 

Asha

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Asha, this is a fabulous project and a wonderful story. Any chance of a separate "rebuild" thread, culminating in your portrait of Vincent? (y)
I might post something up ( without doubt the portrait when I get it done).
Already glued most of bits that needed glueing so the repairs are well on the way .

I have to source some screws that are missing in order to rebuild the camera along with a groundglass although I have a spare glass sat in a reducing back so that’s pretty much sorted already.

There will always be small bits of wood missing but they won’t affect the functioning too much especially as it’s not going to be an ´everyday’ caméra .

Atm the tripod hasn’t shown itself .
I hope it does seeing as it’s part of the package.
In the meantime the camera , once rebuilt , will attach to a standard 3/8 tripod mount.

Hopefully I’ll have some sections reconstructed within the next day or two.
 
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Peter
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A couple of recently arrived cameras.
Olympus Pen half frame camera. A little gem. I have run a film through which is waiting to be processed. I had on in the past but the shutter was compromised, also had a Pen EE3, bought new from Campkins in Cambridge, over 30 years ago or are we talking 40 years? The metering became unreliable so I let it go, The new camera is fully manual with zone focussing, perfect. Half frame is ideal as a film format to take visual notes. The camera seems to work correctly, I hope so.
IMG_0070.jpg
I took a chance on this camera, there wasn't much interest any no other bids.
IMG_0066.jpg
The Kodak came with a film installed so I used that to test the functionality, which seems to be good, perhaps there will be some useable shots from that film. It is currently loaded with Kodak Proimage 100 to get some colour negative pictures. The camera is designed to use Kodachrome, if only. I will have to work out some sort of workflow plan when the negatives are available to scan. The lens filter thread is Series V so I'm hoping that I can get a pair of similar Kodak lens hoods, in fact I've bought one already. It would be nice to have a lens cap but that seems impossible, almost. There is a leather case in bits, I'm going to try to glue the bits together with leather glue and thin leather, stitching is OK.
 
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John
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So, I have run a test fim through my Super Ikonta that I bought a couple of weeks ago, Fomapan Creative 200. As is usual with very old cameras, the slight static generated when winding the film has attracted all the accumulated dust and debris in the camera - every negative is covered in white specks, but the inside is now clean - and I also made the mistake of using a stop bath with Foma film which has resulted with quite a few black spots as well (on the pictures below the dust is black and the stop bath spots are white).

A cumbersome camera to use - it is the wrong shape and the shutter release is not in a good place but with practice would be quite usable.

Super Ikonta 0002.jpg Super Ikonta 0007.jpg Super Ikonta 0008.jpg

This last one is a test of the rngefinder - I focused the rangefinder on the imp - the rangefinder seems to be calibrated OK.
Super Ikonta 0006.jpg
 
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